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Sunday, November 29, 2020

New majlis exhibit highlights Qatari women’s participation in society

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Majlis exhibition
Majlis exhibition

Often perceived as simply a means for women to socialize, the female majalis (literally, “sitting places”) in Qatar actually serve as important forums for political debate, career networking and other topics, according to newly released research.

The findings of that research will be presented by students and professors from various universities tonight at the Hamad Bin Khalifa University Student Center, during the launch of a new exhibition titled “Her Majlis.”

Majlis exhibit
Majlis exhibit

According to those working on the project, the goal is to highlight the state of affairs of women’s empowerment in Qatar by examining the thoughts and opinions voiced in the majlis al-hareem (female majlis), which some 84 percent of local women participate in.

The term majlis al-hareem is used to describe women-only gatherings that take place in Qatari homes or at majalis next to the home where women gather on a weekly or monthly basis to catch up with friends and family over tea, coffee and snacks.

In a statement, Everette E. Dennis, dean and CEO of NU-Q, said:

“This remarkable research challenges misconceptions about female repression or exclusion within society, dispelling negative stereotypes, particularly the role of women portrayed in international media coverage of the Middle East.”

Majlis exhibit
Majlis exhibit

Key findings include:

  • Participants largely agreed that Qatar encouraged women to work, but that there was substantial pressure on them to focus on their families in lieu of their careers;
  • Women support granting citizenship to children and non-Qatari spouses of Qatari mothers;
  • Women were largely in support of enforcing the wearing of the abaya and shayla for Qatari women;
  • Women believed that the Shura Council should be elected; and
  • Participants saw enrolling in a university as a gateway to becoming an independent person.

Challenges

The Her Majlis or Majlis’ha exhibition is the result of over a year of anthropological research and phone surveys of 1,049 Qatari women.

Those conducting the research said they encountered many challenges, including that of access.

Majlis exhibit
Majlis exhibit

This was tackled by training some student researchers, mostly Qatari women, to conduct ethnographic and observational studies while attending various majlis events hosted by family members and friends.

Speaking to Doha News,  Najla Al Khulaifi, a 21-year-old Communications junior at Northwestern University in Qatar and student researcher, said:

“It was weird at first. These were gatherings that we were already a part of, but were now entering as researchers rather than participants. It was fascinating to step outside of it and see that this was something that needed to be studied.

When you see the kind of conversations that take place and the power that comes out of these gatherings, it’s great. We didn’t expect to get the response that we did.”

Beyond gaining access to the majlis, the students also had difficulty in trying to explain the concept of informed consent and ethnographic research to the participants, said Dr. Tanya Kane, an anthropologist and faculty mentor on the project.

Majlis exhibit
Majlis exhibit

“We were asking our Arabic students to go into these familial places that they had grown up in, and all of a sudden, introduce this paper that required IRB, or institutional review board consent,” she said, continuing:

“It was taking a Western academic practice and trying to implement it (here). It didn’t really make sense to a lot of people involved because it was just a foreign concept. Not only that, but these were friends and sisters and aunts (of the students) and we were trying to impose formality into this informal meeting.”

Kane added that the group also faced challenges in representing Qatari women on film during the documentary process, which entailed balancing the need for information with some subjects’ desire for anonymity.

Outside the majlis, Qatar University’s Social and Economic Survey Research Institute (SESRI) carried out phone surveys in which Qatari women were asked about their opinions on a variety of subjects pertaining to religion, politics and social issues.

Presentation

Like most anthropological surveys, the project’s findings are more qualitative than statistics-based, with the month-long exhibition presenting a mix of film, photography and statistics on women’s opinions on society and how the majlis has become an agent for social change and commentary.

The last point is the focus of several student-made documentaries, which are played in a truncated form at the exhibition and offer insight into how Qatari women think and act in society.

According to Kane, the full documentaries have been submitted to film festivals and will screen at the upcoming Middle East Studies Association Film Festival in Denver.

The exhibition also contains a statistics wall, based on SESRI’s phone survey results:

Majlis exhibit
Majlis exhibit

The exhibition’s official opening will be held today from 6 to 10pm at the HBKU Student Center Gallery.

From tomorrow until Oct. 8, it will be open daily from 7am to midnight on most days, except on Fridays, when it will be open from 1pm to midnight.

Thoughts?

20 COMMENTS

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WTF
WTF
5 years ago

“This remarkable research challenges misconceptions about female repression or exclusion within society…”

LOL

Yacine
Yacine
5 years ago

For me this exhibit is better than the nonsense coming from Qatar Museums…

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Really? I can hardly sleep at night, knowing that the Luc Tuymans retrospective is coming to Doha. I just hope it will be as amazingly exciting as some of the other world famous big name arts celebrities, like Mona Hatoum, Cai Guo-Qiang, Etel Adnan and Francesco Vezzoli. Don’t tell me you’ve never heard of these people?

Michkey
Michkey
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Mona who? Tuymans sounds vaguely familiar though. People have interests in different stuff so comparing them is meaningless. For example I’d give anything to see David Attenborough going on about near-extinct species or Ana Popovic performing at the QNCC!

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

Lol. Actually, David Attenborough must have come to Doha recently, because part of his recent documentary about Birds of Paradise was filmed at the Al Wabra Wildlife preserve. It’s a shame that there wasn’t an opportunity for him to speak – that would definitely have pulled in a huge crowd.

Michkey
Michkey
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

He came indeed, not recently though, in last winter. I guess he is too old for public speaking alongside filming abroad. A pity really.

Yacine
Yacine
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Haha yeah I know them all and I am not impressed at all. You can add the crazy Damian Hirst to the list …

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago

Qatar’s record on female participation in society is encouraging, especially when you look and some of the surrounding countries. This is an area where Qatar has made great progress.

AEC
AEC
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Putting them at 116th on the WEF Global Gender Gap rankings for 2014
http://reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2014/rankings/

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  AEC

But they are heading in the right direction, I’ve worked with lots of Qatari women. Something you would not be able to say in Saudi. In fact you’d be surprised women even leave in that barbaric kingdom at all.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Some would say that you’re bipolar because this isn’t the kind of things you often say.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

How flattering you choose the same name as me.

I have been a consistent supporter of women’s rights, just check my previous comments.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I didn’t choose the name as you. I am (the insane) you.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Okay I don’t know who you two are, but stop using my name please.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Hai yuo stahp lyin yuo lier.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I’ve added a pic so they know the real me…..

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Like anyone cares

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Now go ahead and say something like “oh, this is the new patriarchal plot to trap women into fancy boxes!”.

O
O
5 years ago

Still separation of men and women. Better both gender could have a debate so that, we will know who has better minds.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago

The “key findings” suggest that women are looking for empowerment and not that they actually have it.

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