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Sunday, November 29, 2020

Amnesty urges Qatar to fight domestic worker abuse with ‘bold reforms’

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Domestic worker
 

With reporting from Riham Sheble

The system governing domestic workers in Qatar is broken beyond repair and should be revamped to ensure these women’s rights are protected, a new 63-page report from Amnesty International asserts.

Titled “My sleep is my break: Exploitation of migrant domestic workers in Qatar,” the report is the most recent and comprehensive look on the subject. It presents a grim view of how maids, nannies and other women employed as domestic help here are treated.

Rights groups have expressed concern about domestic worker abuse in Qatar for years. Though the Gulf state, which is hosting the 2022 World Cup, is under increasing scrutiny for construction workers’ rights, the plight of maids is a more difficult conversation, Amnesty researcher James Lynch told Doha News. He said:

“As in so many countries, when domestic workers face abuses it often goes unnoticed by the outside world. There are lots of reasons for this but perhaps most obviously, most abuse takes place behind closed doors, making it harder for domestic workers to speak to outsiders, either to seek assistance or simply to explain their experiences.”

Amnesty’s latest report contains appalling accounts of psychological, physical and sometimes sexual abuse of domestic workers based in Qatar, at the hands of both local and expat sponsors.

Though only 52 women were personally interviewed by Amnesty representatives, the group said that its findings were supported by those of many other entities based here and abroad, including rights organizations and embassies.

Typically from poor countries, domestic workers in Qatar are a particularly vulnerable group. The women are subject to kafala rules, but are not protected under the country’s labor law. Thus, options to seek legal recourse against their employers are limited. According to Amnesty:

“The result is that domestic workers are particularly exposed to exploitation and other abuse from their sponsors, as there are few checks against the power of the employer beyond the criminal justice system.”

Substitute contracts

Citing the 2010 Qatar census, the latest figures available, the report states that some 84,000 women in Qatar are employed as domestic helpers. The vast majority of these workers hail from the Philippines (30,000 women) and Indonesia (20,000 women).

Women are also hired from Sri Lanka, Nepal, India and increasingly, east Africa and eastern Europe.

The problem for many of these workers begins at home, when they sign contracts detailing a reasonable set of job expectations and wages (typically $350 or $400/month).

That contract is then often replaced with less favorable terms such as lower wages and longer working hours when the worker arrives in Qatar and is greeted by the recruitment agency at the airport, the report said. Many times, the contract is in Arabic so the worker cannot understand it.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

The deception has had far-reaching implication for many women employed in Qatar as domestic helpers. In 2012, health officials said they treated a rising number of maids at Hamad Medical Corp.’s psychiatry department, who were sent there to learn coping skills for anxiety, depression and anger – in part due to being misled about their job duties.

Qatar’s Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs told Amnesty it is working to tackle contract substitution with a new website that allows employees here to choose their employers from online applications. Officials said:

“This project will ensure there will no longer be any discrepancy between the job the worker has signed up for in his country from that signed in Qatar, as all the documents listed on the information base, including the work offer by the employer, will be registered. In the case of any disagreement between the two sides in the future the information can be checked and verified.”

However, Amnesty said it is not clear whether domestic workers would be included as a category on the website.

Over the past few years, Qatar has also increased scrutiny of manpower agencies and begun grading them for their services. But the criteria appears to be oriented more toward the sponsors of domestic help, rather than the women themselves. The report states:

“It should be possible for potential migrant domestic workers and employers to assess a recruitment agency for its adherence to labour rights standards, as distinct from other criteria such as efficiency of services provided to employers.”

It also recommended that Qatar extend its new policy of blacklisting companies that abuse migrant workers to include those who abuse domestic help, so that they cannot hire more such employees in the future.

Abuse

Once domestic workers arrive in Qatar, they are largely at the mercy of their sponsors in terms of working hours, recreational options and even food.

Though some women interviewed by Amnesty said their employers were “kind,” others worked in harsh conditions under abusive sponsors. Due to a lack of regulation, these workers did not have many avenues to seek recourse for this treatment, the report said.

Types of abuse included:

  • Long working hours. Fourteen women interviewed by Amnesty said they worked at least 15 hours a day, seven days a week, amounting to average working weeks of more than 100 hours. A UN report last year found that domestic employees in Qatar work more than 60 hours a week – longer than those in any other job in the country.
  • Violence. A dozen women told Amnesty that some form of violence was used against them by their employers as a way to discipline them. Punishments included slapping in the face; pulling hair; poking in the eyes; pushing; kicking down the stairs; throwing hot oil; kicking in the stomach; holding hot objects against the skin; and pinching or scratching of the skin.
  • Non-payment/wage deductions. This method was used by many sponsors to ensure that workers remain in their jobs. According to Amnesty, employers “can exploit the isolation faced by domestic workers, which makes it more difficult for them to complain to the authorities or stop working, and non-payment can therefore often continue for very long periods.”
  • Passport confiscation. Almost all of the women interviewed by Amnesty said that recruitment agents gave their passports to their sponsors, and they never saw them again.
  • Restrictions on movement. Several women told Amnesty they were only allowed to leave the house when accompanied by their employer or employer’s relative. Others said they were locked in the house when their sponsors left. This is concerning because “there is no way of them getting outside of the house to get help,” one social worker who assists distressed Filipino workers told Amnesty. In some cases, cell phones were confiscated, and many times, women were turned down when asked if they could go to church.
  • Verbal abuse. Some workers said they faced a barrage of insults from their sponsors, who call them “prostitutes,” “stupid,” “not clean,” “animal,” and other derogatory words. Amnesty highlights media coverage of maids in this segment of the report, citing articles from Arabic dailies that stigmatize these women as thieves, witches and “a threat to the future of society.”

When they run

Faced with abuse, some women make the hard decision to leave their employers, but still find little relief.

Amnesty recounts the tale of Maria, a 24-year-old Filipina maid whose employer never paid her, was not allowed to have a mobile phone, had no days off, and was once given moldy cheese to eat. When her female sponsor began physically abusing her, she decided to leave by simply walking out the door.

According to the report:

Maria said she walked alone for hours, still dressed in her uniform.

“I saw a guard, and he said, ‘where is your ID?’ I said sorry. I went to the mall, and saw a guard there, and asked for a taxi. He asked why I needed a taxi. He asked if I had a problem; I said no. I saw a Filipina, and I said, ‘please help me.’ She said, ‘sorry, I’m busy.’

I went back to the mall to get a taxi. I said ‘sir, please send me to the airport’. [The driver] asked me why I was going to the airport. I said I was going on vacation.”

Maria eventually ended up at a deportation center, a common fate for many absconding female workers. According to Amnesty, 95 percent of the women detained in a center the group visited last year were former domestic helpers.

The report added that the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants found last November that most women being held there had left their employers due to poor working conditions. He encouraged authorities to stop punishing domestic workers for being abused.

At the time, François Crépeau said: “Accommodating such women in open shelters, instead of building a new ward for women at the deportation centre, would provide a much better and cheaper solution.”

Prison

Domestic workers also comprise the majority of women in Qatar’s jails, according to Amnesty’s report. About half of those in jail were held on charges of having sex outside of marriage, or for theft.

Due to a fear of being charged with having “illicit relations,” many women who are sexually abused in Qatar avoid reporting the crime. Additionally, Amnesty states that:

“Domestic workers may not immediately report rape or sexual abuse to the authorities, (because of) post-traumatic shock, feelings of shame, fear of the repercussions of making a report, lack of information about how to make a report or physical confinement in the home.”

In line with the UN’s position on extramarital affairs, Amnesty urged Qatar to repeal the criminalization of consensual sex between adults. It said the current rules have a “chilling effect” on the willingness of women to report sexual violence or rape.

The report also highlighted one effect of charging people with “love crimes,” saying that researchers observed 13 children between the ages of one month and two years old with their mothers during a prison visit last March. Five pregnant women were also detained at this time.

Speaking to Doha News last year, one former domestic worker explained her ordeal after getting pregnant and having a baby out of wedlock in Qatar.

Government response

In a letter to Amnesty, Qatar’s Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs acknowledged that house help does not fall under the labor law, but there are articles in this law and others that protect all residents from things like abuse, passport confiscation and human trafficking.

However, it did not address concerns about how domestic workers can avail themselves of these laws, when they are often locked up inside of sponsors’ homes and unaware of their rights.

The ministry also mentioned that a draft law is in the works to detail domestic workers’ rights. This legislation has been talked about for years, but has stalled recently across the Gulf because of a provision that would allow women to have one day off a week.

Finally, the ministry said the government has been working to raise awareness among domestic helpers about their rights. For example, it said the Qatar Foundation for Combating Human Trafficking liaises with the Filipino embassy here to help distressed women get assistance.

Recommendations

To improve labor conditions for domestic workers, Amnesty made several recommendations, including that Qatar:

  • Amend the labor law to include domestic workers so that they are afforded equal legal protection;
  • Lift kafala restrictions that require sponsors’ approval for employees to switch jobs or leave the country;
  • Amend the labor law to allow all migrant workers, including domestic help, to form or join trade unions;
  • Scrutinize recruitment companies for compliance to international human rights standards, and cancel the licenses of violators;
  • Improve awareness among domestic workers and officials on how to report a human trafficking crime and prosecute it;
  • Decriminalize “absconding” and explore alternatives to detention;
  • Make it easier for workers to report abuse by allowing them to return to their home countries during court cases or work for a new sponsor as the case goes through the system; and
  • Train police officers to assist and identify victims of domestic violence, which should be criminalized under the law.

Countries of origin were also urged to enforce the regulation of recruitment companies, shore up training and orientation of workers headed to the GCC, increase support to diplomatic missions in Qatar to help those facing abuse and offer a complaint mechanism for those in need of help.

And on an individual level, there’s also many things a sponsor of a domestic worker could do to ensure her basic rights, Lynch told Doha News:

“First and foremost, we expect that people who employ domestic workers in their home think hard about what they are pro-actively doing to ensure their employee’s rights are respected.

That should include making sure for themselves that the person they recruit from overseas fully understands the terms and conditions outlined in their contract, and offering their employees decent wages and working hours, with time off every week, as well as a proper space to live in. They should also demand high standards of their recruitment agents and find out what systems they have in place to ensure domestic workers’ rights are respected.”

Here’s the full report:

Thoughts?

63 COMMENTS

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Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago

Chilling report. Thank you Amnesty International for bringing the plight of these women to the spotlight. Let’s not deny these things happen, because we all know they do, and the perpetrators are both locals and expats.

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

i just wonder if Amnesty is ever going to touch on issues such as domestic violence against the female nationals themselves and all other restrictive laws and prejudices embedded in the “Sharia Law”.

it seems that these organizations are very open on criticizing and protecting the rights of the expat women whom are widely abused, but avoids the subject of female nationals almost completely.

if they don’t treat their own women right they will probably treat other women worst

Shabina921
Shabina921
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

There are several pages in the report covering domestic violence in Qatar and the nation’s attempts to tackle this problem.

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago
Reply to  Shabina921

If thats the case there wouldn’t be a report to begin with since Qatar is also “tackling” the above issue. It’s a one-liner and doesnt even touch on the subject. It is basically in line with “their people, their problem”

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

Where would they get the information from? Domestic abuse isn’t something people talk about openly in any society, and some women who are abused tend to hide what they go through. Hopefully these reports published by Amnesty will spark a national debate amongst locals about how they treat their women. However, as a local woman, my main issue isn’t domestic abuse, but the ‘protection’ that is imposed on me. I have to be chaperoned around more than my brothers do, and my cousin’s parents were not keen on allowing their daughter to study abroad. That, I think, is one of the main annoyance some local women face

johnny wang
johnny wang
6 years ago

What a crying shame and a disgrace. .. and the most ridiculous thing is if this abused and brutalized maids and workers run away then they are caught and sent to the deportation centre or put in jail for no sensible reason at all. ….How disgusting can things really get in this parts for this poor and helpless maids and workers. Perhaps Al Jazeera has a nice breaking story to cover on this topic

Guest
Guest
6 years ago

Yawn…

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago

I agree 100% on this article…The solution for all this is to abolish the kafala system..Maid should not give their passport to their sponsor…And atleast for the maids the exit permit should be stopped…if any abuse they should leave the country without approval of sponsor

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

It is difficult for a prisoner to escape. Kafala is not to blame here.

johnny wang
johnny wang
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

…perhaps you meant it is difficult for a slave to escape………Its astonishing that such abuses and bad treatment of such workers is still going on in todays civilized world and to think that this abuses are rampant through out this countries and perhaps with official backing and support as they, the authorities don’t seem to be doing anything much about this abuses

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago

it’s easy to criticize a system you do not understand. Kafala does not mean you hold an employee’s passport, it means you fall under their sponsorship as if they were a holding entity. you need sponsorship “Kafala” from a company when you apply internationally and you can thank a few expats that messed up the country and fled for the exit permit system that is, i agree, messed up. If they did keep your passport – which is illegal, and abused you, pay 50QAR for a Taxi and go to your embassy for support, yet most don’t do that, why? because they come here via crippling debt from their “honest” recruitment agencies that they have to pay while in Doha during their job, or because they’d rather take the abuse than go back, or because they have kids and a family to feed, or because they’re simply afraid to do so.

Kafala is not the issue, remove, fire, and blacklist abusive recruitment agencies and create more venues the abused could get in touch with in such cases. make a campaign for that instead of a campaign for spitting in the street, which is gross anyways

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

One solution to this is to educate the maid in their country before coming up here just for them to be safer

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago

and who do you suggest take care of that?

if they are already being tricked by these agencies do you think the Agency will give them a “know your rights 101” crash course?

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

Mayette…the maid should do a little bit of home work before coming here…ask other colleagues or friends who experienced their stay here…atleast get an idea…do not jump to come only for the sake of money

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago

You’re very assured that this person may have friends that already did it and youre very assure that they are not desperate with hungry children they are thinking of first beforr their own selves.
what if the friend’s family is OK and yours are crazy nut jobs? What if you end up beaten before you could even go to the embassy?

Also you’re technically blaming the woman for her own abuse abd that if she did that research abd if she could read or could talk to her plethora of colleagues that know about Qatar, she wouldn’t fall under this scenario.

It seems you piggybacked on the article only to comment on the kafala system

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

It is not only the maids who are affected…people like me for example is also affected by kafala system…although i did not come through an agent

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago

Abd how are you affected? Can’t leave? Holding your passport illegally, put action istead of words and do something about your abusive sponsor. But just like you blamed the women, should I then blame you fir not doung anything and simply just blaming a visa system?

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

I mentioned that i did not come through an agent

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago

So you either came through a direct sponsor usually Qatari, or staying here illegally

Shabina921
Shabina921
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

Let’s keep this focused on the story at hand, please.

johnny wang
johnny wang
6 years ago

…yeah that would be a good idea but then who will educate the employer or her sponsor on how to treat the maid in a proper, decent and respectable manner and not as a slave

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago
Reply to  johnny wang

And interesting human conundrum, why do foreigners also abuse their maids while in Qatar? Why are maids abused in singapore, why are maids in the US who are mexican are threatened with deportation, why is human trafficing and abuse a trending issue?

Illusion of power and the knowledge that you can seemingly get away with it help

John Laprise
John Laprise
6 years ago
Reply to  Mayette

Since all companies are majority owned by citizens, whose responsibility is it to police recruitment agencies?

Mayette
Mayette
6 years ago
Reply to  John Laprise

Countries, business owners, service providers and International courts. Though trying to make a point of “owned by citizens(Qatari) hence no one will interfere” dont forget that the recruitment agencies in the base countries are local not Qatari owned, and really owend by that country’s citizens as well. These companies don’t only send people to Qatar and the GCC, they send them internationally to be abused or in some cases prostitution.

depending on the business approach, you do have recruitment agencies in Qatar that do their hiring in-house, or they hire other recruitment agencies to find them the needed manpower in said country. Countries need to interfere with illicit business practices whether sending or receiving, and caught businesses should in the ideal world go to court for fraud and human trafficking.

But the question to you then is, if citizens of the other countries also own most of these businesses, whose responsibility is it.

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago

What I don’t understand why maids have to give their passports over to their sponsors in the first place. I mean, expats employed as, say, doctors or accountants don’t have to be subjected to this kind of treatment, do they? I just feel like there’s no way to defend this kind of action…

greylag
greylag
6 years ago

And if they did have their passport? They go to the airport and pull out their Visa card and buy a ticket home? How naive can you be?

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago

Best way to fix this problem is a total ban on housemaids… No exception … There are no quick or long term fixes… You want your house cleaned then hire cleaners by the hour … Want a nanny hire her from an agency on a hourly rate… Need a permanent care taker hire a stay at home nurse …

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

I think that is a fantastic idea. Not sure you will get much support for this from some sections of the population.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

utopia!

I_am_an_Ordinary_person
I_am_an_Ordinary_person
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

With the amount of wealth / easy money floating around, I would not be surprised if your model is converted to the current system by hiring 24 / 7 / 365 times number of years and then request volume discount on hourly rate.
Effectively it would mean the same system as the current one but with different units of measurement.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago

those abusing are also surprised that after working 24/7 these maids or nannies “even” have the urge to eat! And of course they are given what? Only noodles!

filmingindoha
filmingindoha
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

Well, how about us expats where both parents work, and nanny needs to take care of the kids in the afternoon… Not all employers are bad, both local and expat. I know our nanny is a part of our family, loves our kids and kids love her.

K Abdulghani
K Abdulghani
6 years ago

I’m curious as to why expats don’t or can’t afford maid from their home country hire one when they move to Qatar?

Marie
Marie
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

As one of the expat mums who doesn’t have a maid, I can totally understand why people with young children do. Most of us have no extended family here to help out with childcare, and don’t have the friendship network to call upon that we’d have at home. So we have to cope on our own 24/7. Childcare provision is not the same as our home countries – I can’t drop my son off at a crèche, whilst I go grocery shopping, so have to take him with me – tantrums are bound to follow. There is no free nursery provision several times a week, so that I can arrange doctor / dentist / hairdresser’s, etc. appointments as I might at home. No breakfast club or afterschool club so that I can work, and collect him afterwards. That’s all apart from the larger size of properties here, which are more difficult to keep clean – due to size, more dust, lack of carpets (they’re easier to keep clean than shiny floors when you have a toddler), more bathrooms! It probably sounds very mundane and whiney, but it all adds up to making life more difficult to manage without help. For us, the choice is no help at home – more mess, and I can’t work – but we can sort of make it work. It’s far from ideal though.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

because Qatar does not allow it! Just to give you an example: an Argentinean family wanted to bring their Peruvian maid that worked for them in Argentina. They could not. As the “maid” was working helping in the family to pay for her studies at University, she is quite educated. They could bring her only as “tutor” for their children being all Spanish speakers. This way they managed. But I cannot bring someone from my own country, because Qatar does not let me

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

Just speaking of my experience, the vast majority of people in the west don’t have maids and you’re never going to get someone from the US to come be a maid nor could you afford the salary they would ask.

I_am_an_Ordinary_person
I_am_an_Ordinary_person
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

I would put this behaviour by both expats and nationals to a simple mentality – if the thing is cheap, it is not valued / cared for. But if the same thing comes in really pricey, then the attitude changes.
Prime example is professional butlers in 5-star hotels vs poor desolate ladies coming to work as maid on whatever terms for a very meager pay.
Also, the fact that there are not enough / non-existant redressal system makes it much easier to get away with any of such abusive behaviour.
Why does this not happen in West? The answer is the mechanism to protect the rights is so robust that the abuser will repent each and every moment all the life for it.
So in short, get them the pay they deserve by ruling minimum wages and then provide effective implementation / redressal systems.

readabook000
readabook000
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

Some who would rely on family (grandma) or group care options for small children in their home country do not find these options available in Qatar, and thus hire domestic help. Creches in Qatar tend to operate short hours, close for many weeks of the year, and are often full, and with no family, this creates a need to find some kind of child care, nanny is the best solution. As for cleaners, couldn’t tell you.

Chipper fluffypants
Chipper fluffypants
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

I had my parents to help me with my two daughters. When they got to be 2, I dropped them off to day care 2 days a week. This day care also let me do “drop off” care if I had to go somewhere last minute. They also opened at 6am and closed at 7pm. Here, I have no family, my friends all work, and day care closes at 1pm and none of them allow “drop off”. So yes, we employee a nanny when we would not have back home- even though we could afford to pay for one)

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

Because my country does not allow slavery nor does my values and respect for other humans.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
6 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Unless it’s debt slavery.

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago

Expand? Debt slavery?

KK
KK
6 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Agree. In addition, I do not have (and I do not need) a driver or a maid. I am not lazy.

Anonymous
Anonymous
6 years ago
Reply to  KK

It’s not about being lazy. Some expats and locals, for example, have maids and drivers to clean the house, look after the kids, drop them off to school, etc, because both the parents work for long hours. As for children using buses, well, our school buses weren’t exactly all that safe… some of them didn’t have seat belts so that wasn’t an option! Both my parents often had to be at work at the same time, and although my grandparents helped out, they couldn’t help out all the time, and there was no way my mother could come back from her night shift, or no way my father could come back late and be expected to clean the house. I don’t think in the least that my parents were being lazy. Having a maid does not mean that you don’t value human rights or human dignity… Treating a maid like a slave, and withholding her rights from her does. Having a maid and being abusive and/or lazy are therefore mutually exclusive

outdoorsboys
outdoorsboys
6 years ago
Reply to  K Abdulghani

I don’t know anyone in the UK who employs a maid, however, very many, including myself, employed a cleaner who would come to the house and be paid by the hour . The rate I was paying my cleaning lady in 2010 was QAR110 per hour. I valued her immensely and made sure the house was generally tidy before she arrived so she could do the cleaning I didn’t have time to do. She came one morning a week. To employ a full time housekeeper from the UK would be impossibly expensive, at least QAR18000 p.m., plus accommodation, holidays etc. That is more than I pay for my house. That is why westerners could not possibly afford a western housekeeper. You may as well ask why Qatari families don’t employ a local as a nanny- if locals did such work, it would be too expensive for most families.

Here in Qatar, we employ a Houseboy, who works from 8.30am- 4.30/5pm, with an hour for lunch, 5 days a week, half day on Saturday. He is well paid, has his own life outside our home, and we thank him for his efforts every day when he leaves. I and my spouse work long hours and need someone to keep the house in order. This works for us, we can afford it, and he makes more in comparison to average wages back home than we do.
We all obviously understand that salary expectations are different depending on the cost of living in one’s home country, but really, $400 a month, less than QAR1500 for a housemaid, is hardly a lot to pay for someone caring for you home, children, pets, garden. It is affordable, should probably be more. The real issue is not the pay it is the appalling conditions and abuse without the protection of the Law. I find it unbelievable in this day and age.
Expats hire domestic help because the working hours here are generally much longer than in Europe, leaving little time for housework, and as they are earning a good salary, it is certainly better to pay for support than spend your day off doing it.

KK
KK
6 years ago

The cover picture says it all. The master-slave attitude…. Interesting to read how this report is being addressed in the press in the UAE (gulf news)

SullyofDoha
SullyofDoha
6 years ago
Reply to  KK

This ‘master slave attitude’ is more often on display than not. Grab yourselves a latte and a seat at Starbucks in Landmark, C.C. or Villaggio and watch the world walk by. More often than not, I see ladies with their human carrying bag three paces behind them. 😛

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
6 years ago
Reply to  SullyofDoha

I have to say that it’s more the expats who abuse their maids than locals from my experience.

SullyofDoha
SullyofDoha
6 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Interesting comment Deepak… provided you are a social worker that interacts with cases of abused maids on a daily basis for a living and can demonstrate quantitative research to support you statement…

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago

within “Recommendations” I would add: BLACKLIST those families (and companies) who have abused so they will not continue abusing new workers!!!

John Laprise
John Laprise
6 years ago

So here’s a test: Give each of them their wages in cash, their passport, an exit visa, a ride to the airport and make it possible for them to fly home (one way) to their countries of origin. One time offer. I wonder how many would leave?

Anon
Anon
6 years ago

Astonishing that nasty, primitive attitudes to those people making other’s peoples lives easier for a very low rate of pay are perpetuated by the Arabic dailies….if that’s a real reflection of local beliefs, that the people doing all the jobs around the house that they don’t want to do, are ‘a threat to society?’ Seriously? it’s Kafka-esque…..they leave their families, come to this place to try and get a headstart, do all this work and are labelled a threat to society! Well, get rid of them all then! Do some housework and child-rearing yourself….maybe you won’t be so vile and full of self-loathing and contempt then….you may feel like you’ve actually done something normal and worthwhile….I despair for humanity and many aspects of this society in general….the levels of expectation and privilege is unsustainable in the long term, surely.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
6 years ago

It’s funny how we don’t see these reports in other GCC or Arab countries. Oh wait … they’re not hosting “their” World Cup, so there’s no need.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

Guess that means abuse only happens here trolly.

Myrddin
Myrddin
6 years ago

Amnesty, and other International organisations, do publish reports on other GCC countries. Regularly, in the case of KSA.

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago

Poor you being subjected to discrimination just because you have a game of soccer. It’s all about you isn’t it. Not an ounce of care or empathy for these poor souls. Pathetic.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
6 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Our driver has been working with us happily since 1996, our maids for 7 years. I have seen bad treatment of domestic workers with Western and Arab families. I think there was a report about that on Doha News. Pathetic of you to pre-judge people based on pure BS.

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago

No judged you on your care about your perceived persecution by the world because of a soccer game over the care of woman who are raped and imprisoned in Qatar. As a citizen you have the power to initiate change to ensure all people are respected and protected. The imprisonment of rape victims is reprehensible.

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago

You may be the few and the proud dude! so as a citizen who (I hope) cares about primarily the treatment of human beings and the image of his/her country then why wouldn’t you get on board to promote what’s right. I don’t care if you are Qatari or an expat. no mistreatment of a service worker should go unpunished.

You cant maintain an attitude where you say I’m not doing it so its not a problem! It is a problem and its a problem in your country so don’t act like you don’t know.

I’m still laughing at your mom comment by the way…. that was actually hilarious. shame it got censored. LOL!

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
6 years ago
Reply to  BBCA

Son, im ur real daddy go ask ur mom.

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago

Oh noooo! that cant be true. I hope not. because that means that I just did some very sinful things with my mom. That gross! Its not possible. Oh the horror. LOL!

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
6 years ago

They are not mentioned here but there are stories in Dubai newspapers about these problems in Dubai. My friend lived in Kuwait for a while and they used to report the amount of deaths of domestic workers each year. You know ‘accidents’ like maids who fall out of moving cars or fall off balconies etc. But at least they reported it.
Now that would make interesting reading here, if they did a report on deaths of domestic workers in Qatar.

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago

Kafalaaaaaaaaaaaa!

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