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Sunday, June 13, 2021

Appeal court postpones verdict in murdered Qatari woman trial

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Appeals court
Appeals court

The nephew of an elderly Qatari woman who was killed in 2012 has expressed frustration this week over a Court of Appeal decision to delay delivering its verdict until after the summer break.

The court said it would hear more arguments this fall because the three men convicted of killing the woman lacked legal counsel.

Supar Manyn Alagba, 44, Shela Duwai Peyromal, 41 and 22-year-old Sevakumar Arashan confessed to breaking into the woman’s home in the middle of the night and stabbing her to death as they robbed the villa.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

A judge found all three guilty of first-degree intentional murder, armed robbery, breaking and entering and weapons offenses and on Dec. 31, 2014, sentenced them to death by firing squad.

The men appealed the lower court’s verdict. After several sessions, a judge scheduled a hearing for this past Monday to deliver his verdict.

But to the dismay of the victim’s family, the court decided to reopen the trial and schedule a hearing for Nov. 18 to hear more arguments with lawyers present to represent the convicted men.

“Although we were content with the lower court’s verdict, the trial has taken too long,” Rashid Al-Kuwari, the nephew of the deceased woman, told Doha News. He added that he went to court on Monday expecting to hear that the lower court’s verdict had been upheld.

“My aunt was killed in 2012. It’s 2015 now and it’s still not over.”

Murder trial

The convicted men worked in construction, and were former neighbors of the 81-year-old woman, who lived in the Al Salata area of Doha. They would occasionally perform odd jobs and join her for meals during Ramadan despite not being Muslim.

A month after they moved away from the area, the men – wearing gloves and armed with two knives and a hammer – returned to Al Salata, climbed the wall of the woman’s villa and entered through a side door.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

According to the official court verdict, once the men were inside the home, the two older defendants knocked on the woman’s ground-floor bedroom door.

The victim opened it and was pulled outside. While one man pinned her arms behind her back, the other covered her mouth and stabbed her in the right side of her chest with a knife. Forensic examiners would later determine that initial wound to be fatal.

As she fell, she was stabbed in the back by the other man, kicked in the face and dragged into the bathroom.

“They killed the victim for fear of her identifying them,” the court ruling concluded.

Witness

Hearing the commotion, a 26-year-old domestic worker who had been sleeping upstairs left her room and began walking down the stairs, where she was attacked by one of the men armed with a knife.

After a brief struggle that left her with deep cuts in her hands as well as bruises on her neck and leg, the woman retreated to her room, locked the door and called for help.

The men fled with the deceased woman’s mobile phone and several perfume bottles, but were subsequently arrested by police after being identified by the domestic worker.

She knew them from their work in the house and, according to the defendant’s testimony, because she had a relationship with one of the men. However, she was not suspected of being part of the robbery.

Photo of Al Wakrah coast for illustrative purposes only.
Photo of Al Wakrah coast for illustrative purposes only.

The men confessed to police and prosecutors and led investigators to where one of the knives had been dumped near Al Wakrah.

The defense lawyer for the third defendant argued during the criminal trial that his client only intended to rob the woman and not to kill her.

However, the court said a person is still responsible for “unintended consequences that could be expected” during the commission of a crime and convicted him of murder.

It also rejected arguments by defense lawyers that the prosecutor’s alleged sequence of events was “illogical,” that investigators lacked the authority to search the men’s home in Al Wakrah and obtained their confessions under duress.

On the contrary, the court concluded that the statements the men made separately to police and the prosecutor were “free-willed and valid.”

Lacking legal counsel

It’s not clear if the men were without lawyers for all or just some of the appeal hearings. It’s also not known why the sessions were allowed to proceed while the men lacked legal representation.

When a defendant does not have a lawyer and says he or she cannot afford one, an attorney assigned to be on call in the courthouse is typically summoned to take on the case.

It’s unclear why that did not happen in this case. However, in a separate trial last year, several lawyers refused to represent a Pakistani man accused of murdering a 68-year-old Qatari woman.

The attorney who eventually took the case speculated that the victim’s prominence in the local community or the evidence against the defendant may have played a role:

“I think that the previous lawyers dropped the case either because they know the victim’s family, sympathize with them and feel a degree of awkwardness representing the defendant, or because they can see how an open-and-shut case this is and they know in advance that they will lose it,” the attorney, Abdullah Isa al-Ansari, told Doha News in August.

The defendant, Muhammad Zaman Zirdad Khan, was eventually found guilty last November and sentenced to death.

Thoughts?

14 COMMENTS

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Whatever
Whatever
5 years ago

Very sad state of affairs from beginning to end. Nice random photo of Wakrah Coast though.

Misha
Misha
5 years ago
Reply to  Whatever

I understand the need to break up article text for readers with a photo but I don’t understand putting a photo for illustrative purposes when it doesn’t add value or pertain to the article.

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
5 years ago

How many executions have taken place in Qatar in the last decade, if any? Anyone? According to Death Penalty Worldwide (old info) “Qatar has rejected recommendations of members of the Human Rights Council that it ‘abolish stoning and flogging from its legislation’; we found no legislation that establishes stoning as a punishment. A reasonable explanation of Qatar’s rejection is that it should not be asked to abolish punishments that do not exist under its current legislation, but we may not have all the relevant laws, or Article 1 of the Penal Code could be interpreted by some as authorizing Shari’a-based methods of punishment.” Anyone have info on this?

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
5 years ago
Reply to  Rane de Beer

Qatar hasn’t carried out any executions in over a decade, according to rights groups.

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
5 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

Tx. So this could be first in long time if final verdict is made.

Yummykarak
Yummykarak
5 years ago

This is sad. I feel bad for the family. First to have a relative murdered by such desperate spineless cowards and then to have to drag through the court system. I am very sorry for them.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago

Are these men in jail waiting for the judge’s decision or are they in Belgium? I think we need to know

Observant One
Observant One
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Condolences to the family and if these men are guilty through proper evidence and process then their fate awaits, but in answer to your question not being Qatari I would suggest that they are not enjoying a Belgium Lager …..

Saleem
Saleem
5 years ago

And a lot of retards on here would talk about how justice is speedy for locals…go kill yourselves.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
5 years ago
Reply to  Saleem

Deleting for using offensive language.

Maddix
Maddix
5 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

You can easily blur out any curse words instead of deleting the whole comment..

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago

A country is measured by it’s judicial system more than anything else, and Qatar somehow has to start to to grips with it’s judicial system if only to get the correct procedures in place. A lawyer must be appointed by the court to represent a defendant, and unless there is some absolutely overwhelming reason why he cannot represent the defendant then whether it’s a lost cause or not he should do what every lawyer must do which is without prejudice or favour to anyone else in the proceedings represent his client to the best of his abilities. Cultural issues such as potentially losing face due to the potential loss of a case is not a valid reason to withdraw. As for the time it takes for trial and appeal processes in Qatar that is just dreadful for everyone concerned.

aerofoiler
aerofoiler
5 years ago

Its frustrating for him for sure. Imagine the frustrations of the parents of the toddlers killed in the villagio fire. Any comparisons?

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
5 years ago

What a brutal attack, tragic that she had actually shared food and employment opportunities with the defendants. I can surely imagine the frustration of the victim’s family. It’s a good reminder that the slow wheels of justice are unsatisfactory for everyone. Parallels to the Villaggio case are bound to be drawn but you can see the system isn’t working for this Qatari family, either.

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