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Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Awqaf: Ramadan 2014 to begin Saturday night

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Dates

This year, fasting during the month of Ramadan will start on Sunday, June 29, corresponding with the Islamic calendar year 1435 A.H., Qatar’s Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic Affairs has announced.

On its Ramadan account, Awqaf said Saturday would be the last day of the month of Shaban:

The announcement comes on the heels of Saudi’s announcement that no moon could be seen:

That means the month officially begins at sunset tomorrow, when night time taraweeh prayers will be held at most of Qatar’s mosques.

The first fast will be on Sunday, which is when shortened work hours (five hours a day for government employees, and six for the private sector), a ban on public eating and drinking during the day and other changes will begin.

On Saturday, we’ll be running some of the most frequently asked questions about Ramadan in Qatar. What would you like to know? And what advice would you give to newcomers?

A guide of business hours will follow shortly. Thoughts?

16 COMMENTS

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MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Still makes me laugh the ban on public eating and drinking. I’m not sure the reason, whether to impose a religious duty on everyone or to save those who are fasting from temptation.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Sigh…

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

I guess from your narrow view point of what you know is correct, you look down on all non Muslims.

Ramada Kareem my friend.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

> “I guess from your narrow view point of what you know is correct, you look down on all non Muslims.

Ramada Kareem my friend.” <

At first I thought that you're just an attention-seeking troll, but now I'm positive that you're a prejudice pri-k.

Note: It's RamadaN Kareem.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

> “I guess from your narrow view point of what you know is correct, you look down on all non Muslims.

Ramada Kareem my friend.” <

At first I thought that you're just an attention-seeking troll, but now I'm positive that you're a prejudice pri-k.

Note: It's RamadaN Kareem.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

Live and let live my friend, not everyone has the same view on life as you.

The first defence of the intolerant to accuse the other person of prejudice.

GCC Visitor
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Common MIMH, it is definitely not “imposed” on non-Muslims or Muslims who do not practice their religion. Consider it as a cultural etiquette, Muslims will appreciate it and you will feel better.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  GCC Visitor

I don’t eat at work or in public out of respect for Muslims, but it is imposed. You get fined by the police if you eat and drink in public.

Qatar is a multicultural society by the nature of the people that have invited to work here, that needs to be respected too.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You know better than that. Qatar is by no stretch of anyone’s imagination multi-cultural. Sure, there are people from all over the world in Qatar, but multi-cultural implies so much more; Qatar doesn’t yet have the tolerance and respect needed to be considered multicultural. Let’s be frank though, it is not in any way a Qatari priority, but that’s their choice.
I see the Ramadan restrictions in the same light – obey them as they are the law of the land, and understand them as a symbol of Qatar’s intolerance and insecurities, not too much different from how we understand France’s hijab issues.

Regardless, to those who observe it, have a good Ramadan, and to those who don’t, have a good July.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

I find France’s stance quite disgusting. I agree they need to protect their secular constitution from religious attack but removing freedom of choice is not the way to do.

Like you say have a good Ramadan, I’m off round the pool to crack open a cold one to celebrate the start.

Mili
Mili
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Qatar is an Islamic and Arabic country, seriously, how hard is that to understand?
Once you come here you should acknowledgment that and EXPECT no special treatment and don’t expect it to change for you. Once you come here, you should have already accepted it.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Mili

Agreed. Will you start encouraging those foreign Muslims in criminal polygamous marriages to divorce a few wives before entering my country? Once you come here you have already accepted it and should expect no special treatment after all.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Mili

Qatar is a country with a predominantly non Arab population and a country of many faiths.

A country cannot be Islamic or Arabic, no more than it can be described as a golfing country or a hungry country.

However it does have a history and certain traditions followed by the nomads who wandered here from Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, India and Iran over the centuries and I wouldn’t want to deliberate upset those people. (Nor the Africans who became Qataris)

MS
MS
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Every year when the Ramadan starts you guys start the same old debate! What is your point? To change Qatar into a country like the one you came from? Intolerance has many forms.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago

Ramadan Mubarak for all readers and the family of Dohanews, may the blessed month bring you inner peace and spiritual fulfillment.

Rotorhead
Rotorhead
7 years ago

As a working expat who has been here for one week so far, a guide to business and services opening details during Ramadan would be valuable indeed. I found the one the Doha News produced for 2013 and it was clear and looked comprehensive.
I’ll keep my eye out. As for the earlier discussions regarding the observance of Ramadan by non-Muslims, as one myself I will be ensuring that I conform to the rules and whilst I won’t be fasting I certainly wouldn’t flaunt my non-observance publicly. Not only would this be disrespectful and rude but it would hardly be in my own interest as I’ve chosen to come here to work knowing what to expect.
Some people come to the UK and choose not to conform to our social norms; I can hardly complain about that if I then go and do exactly the same thing.

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