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Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Box Appeal to collect items for workers relaunches under Qatar Charity

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A similar initiative in UAE
A similar initiative in UAE

An annual charity drive to collect toiletries and other daily necessities for Qatar’s blue-collar workers has kicked off early this year, and for the first time is being co-led by Qatar Charity.

The Mini Box Appeal, run by the Radisson Blu Hotel, is part of a campaign to encourage residents to donate essential items to help the less fortunate.

Mini Box Appeal 2015
Mini Box Appeal 2015

In Qatar, the drive is typically held in September, but this year an extra “mini” campaign has been launched in conjunction with Qatar Charity, to coincide with international Labor Day on May 1.

From now until April 21, residents can collect small containers, about the size of a shoe box, from the Radisson Blu, which is on the corner of C-Ring Road and Salwa Road.

They can be filled with new items such as t-shirts, caps, disposable razors, deodorant, shaving cream, toothbrushes and toothpaste, talcum powder, small hand towels, combs, soap and shampoo.

Donations of food or money are not accepted.

Once filled, the boxes should be returned to the Radisson Blu by April 21.

They will then be passed on to Qatar Charity, which will organize their distribution to workers in need in the Industrial Area.

For this smaller appeal, there is a target of 500 boxes, the hotel’s PR and Marketing Manager Hanna Moges told Doha News.

This campaign is in addition to the main box appeal which will still take place in September as usual. In the past, around 20,000 boxes annually have been donated and handed out in Qatar during this initiative.

Debate

The charity drive is now in its fourth year in Qatar and eighth year in the region, and operates in countries including Lebanon, Oman, Egypt, Bahrain and the UAE in addition to Qatar.

However, it has attracted controversy as some residents describe the scheme of handouts as undignified, and argue that employers should be responsible for either providing their staff with these essential hygiene items, or should pay workers enough money to enable  them to buy them for themselves.

Zaiqa restaurant
Zaiqa restaurant

There have been a number of initiatives recently to help Qatar’s lowest-income workers.

Earlier this month, two owners of Indian restaurant Zaiqa in the Industrial Area received global publicity after news spread of their idea to provide free food to those most in need.

Shadab Ahmed Khan and his brother Nishad Ahmed put a sign up in the window of their restaurant offering free meals to workers who were unable to afford food, after a customer who ate there said he didn’t have enough money to pay the bill.

However, the owners said they are not inundated with demands, and have just two to three requests a day for the free food since they began the initiative last month, with others too proud or shy to ask for handouts.

Will you take part in the box scheme? Thoughts?

23 COMMENTS

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MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago

How disappointing this still continues. Giving food, basic necessities or other types of aid to the homeless around the world is an admirable work of charity. However these people have jobs, yet still are targetted with handouts by a charity or individual do gooders. I guess it makes them feel better about themselves and they can boast about their charity work at their next dinner party.
There is always the law of unintended consequences, employers know they can cut back on basic essentials for their low income employees as the charities and individuals will step in to make up the shortfall.

Plus this is bad publicity for Qatar, we treat workers so badly and pay them so poorly despite being the richest country in the world that our workers have to rely on handouts for the basics. Shameful really.

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

False, Qatar is not the richest country in the world. The United States, home to more than 3 million homeless US citizens, is the richest.

Catalea
Catalea
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

I think what MIMH meant was it is the richest country per habita, which is true…

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  Catalea

True, that doesn’t mean there’s extra cash money laying around or charity money for who ever shows up at Hamad International Airport. I blame Capitalism. Capitalism is inhuman, don’t hate the player hater the game.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

These people were brought here to work, if they had turned up without a job I would agree with you 100%.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

But there’s extra millions in cash for a fright night teddy bear at the airport, art work, mega bling projects, etc etc. OH and don’t forget $257,500 for a license plate. Your argument holds no water.

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Everytime I go past that yellow teady bear I see a minimum 10 people taking photos and selfies with it. It’s called marketing and we have to give them credit for it.

What’s with the license plate? You mean the whole country or the locals are responsilbe for the decision of an individual? Well, I never blamed the Americans for that $500,000 bottle of wine sold to Chase Bailey.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

Marketing? Hardly. If there was a pile of rubble there someone would take a foto with it.

What’s with you and Americans? We’re talking about the low labor force here not being able to afford SHAMPOO!!!

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

“Of it” and “with it” are completely different things.

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

It has been edited. 🙂

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

I did not misspeak

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

But I bet u live and practice it. You say the teddy bear is marketing. Nothing personifies capitalism more than marketing.

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Taking an argument personal? LOL.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

No not at all. It’s just your logic makes no sense to me and I’m answering.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

It shouldn’t be “charity”. It should be decent wages.

Catalea
Catalea
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

Foo, I am not at all justifying what Qatar is doing is right ; I was just clarifying what MIMH meant to say.
On the other hand, I totally agree with you. And the Sad reality is that by living here, by working here, by earning “good” money here, we are all contributing to this issue. If anything, we’re making it worse by creating more and more differences between “us” and them. We are unforuntately, slaves to this capitalistic world … I can go on and on about this topic, so I’m going to stop here. My point being, the issue is there, if we can help whichever way we can until a solution is found, then let’s do it.

AnonymityBreedsContempt
AnonymityBreedsContempt
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

There is quite a bit of extra cash money laying around.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

Per capita Qatar is the richest but thank you for making my point for me. The US has 3 million homeless people, (I’m taking you on your word on this) however these people have jobs! Jobs for some reason that mean they cannot afford basic necessities, yet they are working on jobs that will provide huge financial returns for the investors.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Foo

Shouldn’t be that but that’s 1%. And yes Qatar IS the richest per capita which is how anyone would rank them.

Foo
Foo
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

I think there is a communication problem at your part. Please reread my comment.

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
5 years ago

Nothing for the hammalis. Once again they are neglected

Catalea
Catalea
5 years ago

Hi Saeed, there is an article that has been published ujust a few hours back as well regarding the Hammalis. They are getting help from some people. I just joined the FB page to help as well.
You can find the article and check their updates 🙂

Alin
Alin
5 years ago

Its a clear evidence about the worst situation of blue collar workeres here , these people are on paid work but need charity for basic requirements ? A real shame for employers and regulatory bodies . May Allha give them some instructions aaamin

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