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Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Community urges restraint after man attacked for alleged religious insult

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Flag of India for illustrative purposes only.
Flag of India for illustrative purposes only.

Qatar government and Indian community officials have called for calm after a weekend incident at Safari Mall in which a young man was attacked by a crowd of angry shoppers for allegedly insulting Islam.

Representatives of both groups met during an emergency meeting yesterday to discuss what happened.

Though no official account of the attack has been shared by authorities, video footage taken over the weekend shows a crowd of at least a hundred men gathered around someone crouching against a wall.

Several people can be observed shouting, hitting and punching the person, while a few others try to fend the crowd. Many on the scene were filming the attack.

According to community leaders, the young man has been hospitalized.

Mob mentality

Speaking to Doha News, an Indian expat said the victim was alleged to have posted inflammatory comments in Malayalam about Islam and the Prophet Muhammad.

When he was spotted at the mall, several people accosted him and began questioning him about the posts, Niyas Yusuf said.

Yusuf, who wrote an open letter to Qatar’s Indian community denouncing the attack, added:

“What he did is completely wrong but such acts of mob attack in name of religion should not be encouraged. (It was) just horrible (in a) way which never happened here before and should not happen again.”

Qatar’s Ministry of Interior and community leaders echoed that sentiment, urging residents not to take the law into their own hands.

Girish Kumar, the president of the Indian Cultural Center in Qatar, told Doha News:

“The government has some serious concerns… The message is that no one should, under any circumstances, intervene (in this manner).

The public should not punish someone… Instead, issues should be reported immediately to the authorities.”

Following yesterday’s meeting, which was organized by the Indian embassy and included representatives of several community groups and government officials, Kumar said the MOI may launch an investigation into the individuals who assaulted the man.

He added that it was unclear whether the victim was actually the person responsible for posting any inflammatory material online.

The community leader also denounced both the online insults and subsequent assault, calling on expatriates here to respect the rules of their host nation:

“Qatar is such a great country… (and itoffers) vibrant cultural platforms for all communities and expats.

We need to have strong, peaceful harmony.”

Treading carefully online

According to a US State Department report on religion in Qatar, insulting certain faiths here is punishable by up to seven years in prison.

For illustrative purposes only.
For illustrative purposes only.

That includes defaming, desecrating, or committing blasphemy against Islam, Christianity or Judaism. Additionally, the law stipulates a one-year prison term or a fine of QR1,000 ($275) for producing or circulating material containing slogans, images, or symbols defaming those three religions.

More generally, Qatar’s new cybercrime law has also made it illegal for residents to create and share online content that’s deemed harmful to the country’s “social values” or “general order.”

The law’s passage has prompted many to tread more carefully on social media, though this weekend’s incident is not the first time that Facebook comments have landed a Qatar resident in hot water.

In February, a teacher at an Indian school here resigned after sharing an inflammatory cartoon of the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi on her Facebook page.

Though her actions were not technically illegal, some parents objected to her post, and called the MES Indian School to complain, eventually resulting in her ousting.

Thoughts?

192 COMMENTS

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Jabir.A.T
6 years ago

Two wrongs do not make a right, those who attacked this man have obviously forgotten the history of Islam. If he has posted insulting comments/remarks on social media – please lodge complain against him. Sorry to say that this attack is totally uncivilized, unjustifiable and more importantly – its much more insulting to Islam than the insulting comment this guy has reportedly posted on social media.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Jabir.A.T

No complaint should be made against him for just exercising his right to his opinion. The best thing they can do is to ignore him and get on with their life.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

This would require wisdom and greatness.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Indeed. Someone here posted an insult about him being a cow worshipper. Can I report him to the police for insulting Hinduism…. Oh, of course not because respect only goes one way in Qatar

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Yes, it is not one of the protected religious beliefs.

Yummykarak
Yummykarak
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Actually I had said one should not demean anyone’s beliefs no matter what they are in response to that post. You may have a different opinion and discuss differing ideas and respect each other. You may be whatever you choose to be, that is your choice and it should be respected.
That is very different than slandering,mocking and verbally attacking someone’s faith.
I am sorry you have such a low opinion of my people.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yummykarak

Denying the existence of God is blasphemy under the law here, in Saudi atheism is on a par with terrorism as a crime. Why are my beliefs or lack of beliefs not respected?

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Because if they would allow you to be what you want the system would fall apart and the Kings and Princes would lose all their power. They are fighting hard for their survival. And they use any method available. Religion is one of their favorite tools. It is put on you from “above”, by law. It’s not grown from below out of desire of the people. They are afraid.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Followers of religions or philosophies have been attacked throughout history. It is quite normal. It is better to keep one’s beliefs private to avoid religious wars. Unfortunately people never learn from history.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

We laugh at children that make up imaginary friends and then we have people on the streets of Doha committing acts of violence over who has the best imaginary friend, like it is any better. Time to grow up and join the real world.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

It requires a limited intelligence, indeed, to act in the way they have. Maybe the reason for such incidents is the unlimited stupidity of many people in Qatar?

qatari
qatari
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

just like the west with Israel. look the other way. wait its the WEST, nothing they do,or kill is countable

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I think you cannot look at the west as one on Israel, the Americans support them unconditionally but most of Europe are critical of Israel and their actions. In fact there have been mass protests against Israel’s treatment of Palestinians in some Europe countries.

zeet
zeet
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

what is insulting in that. Its a fact that Hindus worship cows. he just mentioned that. Even if you feel there is something, go to the cops. Typing comments on DN is not considered a complaint.

Yummykarak
Yummykarak
6 years ago

Their behavior was appalling; they should have reported him to the authorities. Those who attacked him should face fines or jail time.
It is always negative when people become over zealous and try to take “justice” into their own hands and in their own interpretation; even sometimes punishing innocent victims i.e. Afghan woman beaten to death.
(Look how messed up countries that have that sort of mindset are-I do not want it here in mine)
Qatar is a Muslim country heavily predicated on Islamic law and it is well known that if one insults our Prophet (PBUH) or the religion itself; they can end up in jail or deported due to the laws of the country. It is just common sense not to do it. If someone does say something derogatory; that does not mean people have the right to become vigilantes. Report it to the authorities and let them handle it.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yummykarak

Reporting it to the authorities is so childish, it is a like a kid in school saying to the teacher my friend insulted my Dad and I want him jailed. Blasphemy should never be a crime anywhere.

Yummykarak
Yummykarak
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I won’t argue with you what should and should not be. Your opinion is your own and that is fine.
This is the law here.
People have the right by law to report someone for blasphemy; it’s been the law since Qatar emerged as a Muslim State and most Qataris are in adherence to Islam.
An individual can ignore it or report an incident.
In the end if someone is offended and wants to take action, I would much prefer them to report it to the police than to try and attack the individual.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yummykarak

But don’t you find that very sad that having a different opinion can land you in jail?

greylag
greylag
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The same is true in many places- sad or not.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  greylag

Unfortunatley true, in Pakistan blasphemy is used to intimidate, execute and perscute those that are not sunni Muslims, even the only Nobel Prize winner for science in Pakistan has been written out of history and his grave
desecrated because he was the wrong type of muslim. Is this something Qatar wants to compare itself to?

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Very true in France and many european countries where claiming less people were killed in Holocaust or denying it gets you a jail time. Even speaking against the zionist project or settlements will get you arrested under anti semitism laws and get you jail time.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

Not many, some and I disagree with that as well. Deny the holocaust of you wish that is your choice but at least their is evidence for that, you cannot produce a shred of evidence God exists.

Speaking out against settlements or zionists does not get you jail. Name one case that has happened

Bingo
Bingo
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

A muslim engineer was killed by a hindu marathi mob in India, not long ago, because he wrote something objectionable about Shivaji who was an old Marathi ruler in India.
So the problem is with everyone and every where.
Religious tolerance is the key….

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Bingo

A secular blogger has been hacked to death in north-eastern Bangladesh in the country’s third such deadly attack since the start of the year.
Police said Ananta Bijoy Das was attacked by a masked gang wielding machetes in the north-eastern city of Sylhet.
Mr Das wrote blogs for Mukto-Mona, a website once moderated by Avijit Roy, himself hacked to death in February.
Mr Roy, a Bangladeshi-born US writer, had criticised religious intolerance.

Source: BBC
And this is the “other” side of Freedom of Speech.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

As it should be, as it should.

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymouse

So questioning holocaust means jail term but writing derogatory comments on someone’s faith means freedom of speech award. Typical western hypocrisy.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

I don’t believe that I said any such thing. If countries want to jail people for offending/questioning their mythologies or their histories that is their choice. I fully support prosecuting you for denying the Holocaust in countries where it is a crime. I also support prosecuting those who offend religions where it is a crime. I think that both laws are asinine and not worthy of modern society, but those are the laws of the land. Also, please don’t ever call me Western again – it offensive to my identity.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

Ҥ 130 Public Incitement (1985, Revised 1992, 2002, 2005)

(1) Whoever, in a manner that is capable of disturbing the public peace:

incites hatred against segments of the population or calls for violent or arbitrary measures against them; or

assaults the human dignity of others by insulting, maliciously maligning, or defaming segments of the population,

shall be punished with imprisonment from three months to five years.”

The law condemns “Public Incitement” or “Hate Speech”. Not specifically against Jews but against anybody. This is the law in Germany who is one of the main culprits of the holocaust.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

it depends on what sort of opinion difference you have

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

A different opinion is not the same as belittleing someone/something via cartoons or insults.I understand your point but wonder if it is actually something worth fighting for or getting upset over.However there have been cases where I question if the reaction was warranted as well.But we all have our own little things.You don’t make fun of someones mother could be one example.That can be touchy and something someone might stand up and take seriously in some circles(probably many).

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

If you make fun of someone’s mother than makes you an a**hole but not a criminal. Same here

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

But most likely you could be attacked for it.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

We permanently make fun of mother earth and nobody punishes us. Let’s wait when mother earth punishes us. It (she) doesn’t need us.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Yes, it is. The rules on cartoons and images applies to those who have chosen that belief, and NO ONE ELSE and are subwerviant to national laws. Why do so many people have such a hard time understanding that?

Michael L
Michael L
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You are normally right about many things; on this you are completely wrong and naive. Blasphemy is a crime in this country, we should all respect that if we choose to live here. He should have respected the rule of law as should his attackers.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael L

You are incorrect. We have to obey it as it is the law – respect is not required.

Michael L
Michael L
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymouse

Perhaps not, but it is advisable especially when you are a guest in someone else’s country.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael L

Depends on how you define respect though, doesn’t it? Respect is not something that you can turn on or off, while obedience is. At the end of the day that the the thing about obeying the rules/law. If you do it, no one will ever know whether you respect the system around you or find it utterly contemptible.

Michael L
Michael L
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymouse

Never thought I’d say this but with attitudes like this I’m not surprised some of the locals on here tell people to go home.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael L

Oh I fully see the local ways as a perfectly valid worldview and way of organizing society. That is respect, not admiration or a desire to emulate. Frankly, I’ve only encountered a handful of societies that I find I admire or would emulate – my native one is not among them. I don’t know what more you should expect of a person.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymouse

One could hope for common sense in place of overarticulation.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Common sense and religion are mutually exclusive

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

One can be religious and still have common sense.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Haha. God committing genocide, telling Abraham to murder his son, winged flying horses, splitting the moon in two. 100 of Indians attacking one man because of something he wrote.

Nope don’t see it

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Its very easy to find examples of whatever you want to bolser your point of view.Probably easier that expanding upon your point of view.

zak
zak
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Muslims wearing hijab getting killed in France, millions thrown out of their homes in Palestine. 3 muslims shot dead in Chapel Hill but its only a “parking dispute”. Thousands of muslims killed in India because some Hindus just wanted to kill them. But then again when muslims are victims, you go blind. Just another case of your hypocrisy.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  zak

Not at all, I have defended the Palestinians and the unjust treatment by Israel, I have highlighted the persecution of Muslims by Buddhists in Myanmar and even Jews being killed at supermarket in Paris by Muslims. Go and read some of my posts.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  zak

Kenya shopping mall, Kenya school massacre, murder of 40 odd cops Philippines, no room to write Boko Haram crimes, Ottawa, Sydney, ethnic cleansing of Libya. Is this really a comparison you want to get into? Lots of victims to go around. This isn’t really a comparison game that you want to get into because the stats aren’t pretty.

zeet
zeet
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You forget the best one- 5 years jail in India if you eat beef because apparently cow is God.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

It’s common sense that the universe is ruled by the laws of physics and not by an unknown superior being.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago

That may be fine but the universe is also made up of humans,some of whom may obide by the laws of physics and others who may go to the QDC.Actually humans are what makes the universe interesting.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Diego, you don’t have to “obey” the laws of physics, you don’t have a chance to ignore them. You are through them. Now, take away the electro-magnetic force which holds the atoms together and you’ll cease to exist. Take away religion and you still can live on. It is common sense.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago

Every time I take my litrebike out to Losail for a track day, I say a prayer and then do my best to defy those laws of physics.It works for me.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

So, you mean you can fly? Wow!

Diego
Diego
6 years ago

No, just confirming one can mesh religion with common sense or lack of it in some instances.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Well, you can mesh it and live with the illusion that it works together. But in the end religion won’t help you to stand on the surface of earth. It’s something called ‘gravity’. Not a religion, though, just a measurable effect of something keeping you in place.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago

But I will never have faith in gravity, I simply take it for granted.But I don’t suppose gravity had anything to do with St. Bernadette,or perhaps that was just good genetics.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

The laws of physics still apply at QDC, it doesn’t operate in a parallel universe…..

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

If you drink enough you may very well be in a parallel universe with unknown physical laws. Have you never woken up in the morning after a night supplied by QDC materials and asked yourself how you had gotten into that bed (place)? Maybe through a Black Hole?

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I beg to differ,they do place a limit on what one can buy.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Correct, that’s the QDC religion. It’s also called ‘politics’. Do you see the connection?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

….

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  Diego

Deleting the rest of this thread for getting off-track.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I agree with many of your comments. However, in this particular case, the rule of law should take precedence, irrespective of one’s opinion. If one believes that the law might have broken and has evidence to prove it, one has every right to notify the authorities.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

The law in this case is wrong but you are correct it is a law in Qatar. However as we have seen around the world it is one of the most abused laws used to intimate and oppress others that do not share your beliefs or to settle scores.

Kim
Kim
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The law is wrong according to who? According to a law back from where you came from?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Kim

It is wrong for any fair minded human. If you are saying God cannot protect himself and you need man made laws to enforce his religion then your faith is weak.

You can’t prove God exists so you jail people because of an idea, how very totalitarian.

#freeraif

Zaheer
Zaheer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

careful lady

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Zaheer

Why, will you issue me death threats and fear of imprisonment to silence me? How very religious and caring of you.

Zaheer
Zaheer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Well, I do care for you .. don’t want religious people to attack you ..

Kim
Kim
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Fair minded human, we can debate about this for decades. The rest of your comment, I don’t know opened that topic, I don’t know why you brought it up with me. Only reason is you’re bringing up cases which you think you defend and running away from what you can’t.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Which proves that religion is a system invented by the ruling classes to control the people.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Well, an American might say that the right to carry guns is an inalienable right, and that the law prohibiting guns is wrong. He can say whatever he wants, as long as he obeys the law.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

But he cannot say what he wants, he is silenced. I would like to know what he posted, if he was inciting violence against muslims that is wrong, if he was just being offensive then that is his right.

You have the right to be offended, but never the right to never be offended.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I am not sure that he was silenced. Someone posted something, but we don’t know for sure if it was him or what exactly was posted. Assuming that he posted, he apparently managed to express his views, but by doing so he might have broken the law. There is only one institution, the Courts, that can determine if the law was broken. Debating if it is a good law or a bad law is as useful as debating if the 80 km/h speed limit makes sense on a Friday morning with no traffic.

Mr. B
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

You are right that rule of law is important, but if a law is immoral or wrong, it also shouldn’t be followed. I realize that many will say that laws protecting religion within Qatar are right (I personally don’t believe any religion should enjoy protection from people making nasty comments about them, but that is my opinion); I’m merely pointing out that rule of law at any cost is not always the best option, either.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Mr. B

I disagree. Some people find the law that prohibits the tailgating and flashing at a car that drives slowly in the fast lane to be wrong. Do you welcome their violations? I can give you more extreme examples, but let’s not get too carried away 🙂

Mr. B
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

The line falls in many societies on whether or not a law causes harm or prevents harm. A law becomes immoral if it causes more harm than it prevents; a classic case was the American Jim Crow regime which was designed to cause more harm to blacks rather than protect whites. When American civil rights activists began to peacefully break those laws, they showed just that; whites weren’t any worse off with blacks sitting where they liked on the bus on a first come, first served basis, but blacks were certainly worse off by being forced to sit in the back or having to give up seats.

Blasphemy laws, in my mind, fall into the same category: they cause more harm than they prevent. They are susceptible to abuse and incite this kind of behavior (with some of these men likely thinking they had the law on their side as they tried to beat this poor guy) while they prevent virtually no harm, since blasphemy can only result in hurt feelings and being offended rather than genuine harm.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Mr. B

I don’t know your nationality. If you are an expat, you should leave it to your Qatari hosts to decide what laws are good for them, especially when it comes to religion and morals. If you are a Qatari, good luck.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

You are right, it is right for Qataris to decide the laws which govern them, but other countries should boycott Qatar for having such an outdated and indefensible law which leads to religious oppression of minorities, violence against individuals and imprisoment in violation of free speech. Saudi Arabia used such a law to silence Raif Badawi, a 1000 lashes and imprisoment for something that cannot be proved in a court of law. That is shameful

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Many counties’ decisions to boycott or impose sanctions are based on geopolitical interests not morals, so don’t count on it.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

Of course it won’t happen but Qatar is careful not jail too many non believers as that would draw attention and that’s the last thing they need on top of the bad PR for the world cup

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Qatar doesnt have any issues with non believers. They have issues with hate mongers. And yes they deserved to be jailed and deported.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

And morals, like religious myths, are far from universal, so it is hard to count on that.

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

If you had so called “morals”, ypu wouldbt be working in Qatar? Stop with the holier than thou attitude.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

I have my own morals, not morals imposed on me decided by someone else.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

Morals are not universal – your morals are not necessarily mine, or anyone else’s. That is why the law is supreme.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

LOL

Mr. B
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

I’m no longer a resident of Qatar, though I quite enjoy the conversations on DN because it’s one of the few (relatively) free forums that allow exchanges like this.

That being said, how wise is it for a country as cosmopolitan Qatar to risk instability by trying to impose a single religion on a very diverse (and mostly temporary) population? Wouldn’t state resources be better used under a secular system? The only argument I can see for keeping strict blasphemy laws is state-led conformity.

This mob attack would have been more clearly unacceptable in such a system, in my mind.

Amber
Amber
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Regardless of whether anyone thinks it should be outlawed or not doesn’t mean the law can be broken.

There are a lot of laws I think are stupid and outdated but doesn’t mean we can break them. And if someone wants to enforce the law they have a right to report that law being broken.

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Burn the Witch?

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Yummykarak

Exactly, there is no requirement to give any credence or belief to differing mythologies around the world, but the laws governing them must be obeyed.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago

I just don’t understand anyone beating up (or killing in other cases) others for any religion….

Chris
Chris
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

You are clearly not aware in the fact that the vast majority of wars all throughout time and the world have had a religious begining then??

Turbohampster
Turbohampster
6 years ago
Reply to  Chris

Don’t think thats what he meant….

Rather he was stating he doesn’t understand why people would revert to violence just because someone criticises a religion!
And I have to say I agree with him

Joe
Joe
6 years ago
Reply to  Turbohampster

I agree…word against ANY RELIGION are just words….KILLING another man for “JUST WORDS is barbaric, cruel and DUMB as S H I T

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Chris

Probably not true. At least in modern history.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

It is mob rule, people feel empowered if they can exercise violence in a large group against a minority.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

yes I get it, but rationally to beat up or kill for any religion is not logical.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

Believing in various Gods and Holy Books or Myths is not logical, so they just take that illogical step further.

Heisenberg
Heisenberg
6 years ago

100 men attacking one man, how religious of you guys.

Vodoo
Vodoo
6 years ago
Reply to  Heisenberg

accusing “you guys” for 100 men, how wise of you!

Heisenberg
Heisenberg
6 years ago
Reply to  Vodoo

Well, I’m addressing the attackers not anybody else.

ɹooknɥs ןnpqɐ
ɹooknɥs ןnpqɐ
6 years ago

everyone should re think before posting such unfair comments in social media. the way mob reacted was totally uncivilized.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Why? Maybe I find your comments offensive and unfair, will you stop posting because I say so?

Kim
Kim
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

He will stop posting if the law see it offensive.

Mr. Reason.
Mr. Reason.
6 years ago

Immediate action should be taken against the perpetrators so that such type of hooliganism is curbed.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago

Guess it was a rehearsal for the world Cup 2022. And it seems that the authorities have no clue how to handle “fans”.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

By having a blasphemy law they are encouraging mob violence like this. I bet his attackers will not even be charged as the police will sympathise with their crimes.

Arijit singh
Arijit singh
6 years ago

Your bias style of writing articles is disgusting

Zaheer
Zaheer
6 years ago
Reply to  Arijit singh

what exactly was Bias

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Blasphemy is victimless crime, physical assult is a crime and should be punished. Attacking someone for having different views to yourself is not the mark of an advanced civilisation and if these people’s faith is so weak they believe they must use violence and intimidation to silence others then that is a shocking indictment of humanity.

Allen
Allen
6 years ago

This reminded me of how it works in India, the bloody “mob rule” running rampant

I came to Qatar so that I can avoid such situation.

Now, if I have to any trust in Qatar, both parties, the mob and the accused (if guilty), should be kept in Qatar jail for at least 10-14 full years with hard labor and issue a warning to all that such matter shall be never be tolerated.

Otherwise, this is a sign of bad things to come.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Allen

The accused if we can call him that why does he deserve jail time? For getting a beating?

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

For making inciting comments against Islam and the Prophet which is a crime punishable under Qatar law.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  zeit

So the person who posted insulting comments against Hindus which was then deleted by this site should also face jail time? Because of course respect goes both ways…. Don’t make me laugh, Islam has no respect for other religions and neither do the majority states. They oppress and persecute minorities as this law shows

Allen
Allen
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

No, only if found guilty for breaking the law. Didn’t you read everything in the article?
Here, check the web address below.

http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/208620.pdf

Just because he got thrashed by Zealous Malayalees, doesn’t mean he goes free if he had posted something offensive on Facebook from Qatar.

Plus it will be safer for both parties to be in jail in Qatar than be on the streets in Kerala after this incident. And those streets that I mentioned are from where all this animosity and hatred start from.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Allen

I don’t know how the streets of Kerala are, but my first housemaid’s brother was briefly jailed and deported for some relatively minor offense. According to his sister, the jail was not exactly a picnic in the Aspire Park

Allen
Allen
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

Well, neither are the streets of Kerala. Jails are not meant to be a walk in the park.

What you saw in the video is nothing compared to what does happen in Kerala because of religious tension. Swords and weapons come into play.

Don’t think of the next statement as a put down; Your lack of knowledge of what happens in India is very evident.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Allen

A bit off-topic, the omnipresent Shabina is watching, etc., but I don’t disagree with you. Heard about Kerala for s first time after I moved to Doha, don’t read the “India” section of the Gulf Times, no Keralite friends, pity…

Allen
Allen
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

When it is peaceful, it’s beautiful; but when it turns hostile, it is ugly. And with India being vast, having various cultures, religions and languages, this is very understandable if it happened in India.

But this happened in Qatar and this is unacceptable by me. Swift action with investigation must be taken, places in and around industrial area should improved with culture and families.

About having friends, “Hi, I am Allen, nice chatting with you. How are you?? :)”

If Shabina from Doha News is reading this, “Hey Shabina, how’s it going? Good job reporting on QF Radio”

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Allen

I think that the authorities should be extremely concerned about mob rule. Today it is Indian mob against an Indian, tomorrow… who knows.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago

I still don’t get it, what makes the mob believe that Good Almighty can’t take care of Himself and needs the mob’s protection… Or is it a convenient way to settle some accounts with impunity?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

Bingo!

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

I’ve often wondered the same thing…How weak must these people’s god be???

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymouse

God is OK, these people are not

Coco
Coco
6 years ago

I guess this thread will also be locked in a couple of hours 🙂 Try to get your best shots in before that happens.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  Coco

I try to give it at least 24 hours 😛

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

LOL, I wonder how many here have been jailed for insulting Judaism. Or Christianity for that matter.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

They don’t matter they are wrong

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

In the eyes of the “true believers”, so true.

Niyas
Niyas
6 years ago

We all have the right to free speech and expression, but that ends when you reach near the tip of another person’s nose as he has the same rights too.., and if it is not stopped there its known as hate speech. If someone does something like that we have no right to punish him or judge him, we have to report the same to authorities and take legal action, under any circumstances peace and harmony cannot be disturbed and this will be destroyed if people take law into their hands as your interests and opinion will be different from others..let’s not post any comments or articles or images abusive to any person or group and also lets not conclude or judge someone without clear understanding of the issue and take law into our hands….this cannot be encouraged as each person has different choices,opinions and likes and all need to live in peace and harmony.

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
6 years ago
Reply to  Niyas

Or one could say: Let’s not be so sensitive that we commit acts like beating someone up, which surely no God would like.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Niyas

But many people around the world find passages in the Koran offensive, should we ban that book because some people are offended? You cannot have free speech for one but criminalize others because they disagree with your views and because you are a majority in one place.

Saying you are offended is such a childish response anyway.

BadaSaheb
BadaSaheb
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You either have absolute freedom of speech or have none of it. You cant jail holocaust deniers and then claim you provide freedom of speech. In India eating beef gets you five years jail. At least things aren’t as ridiculous here. Eating pork or drinking alcohol doesnt get you jailed. Finally, hate speech is not freedom of speech.

AnonymityBreedsContempt
AnonymityBreedsContempt
6 years ago

What is “Mayalam” ?

lisa23
lisa23
6 years ago

a language spoken in India