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Sunday, June 20, 2021

Doha court: Government official guilty of negligence in child’s death

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

A government official faces a one-year jail sentence after being found guilty of “gross negligence” following the death of a five-year-old boy who fell down an uncovered manhole in Qatar.

Speaking after the verdict, the father of the child appealed to Qatari authorities to introduce stringent safety rules so that other families could avoid having to “share this sort of pain.”

Mohamed Sirajudeen’s son Fahim had been walking just ahead of his parents as they left the fish market in Abu Hamour at 7.30pm on Sept. 10, 2013 when the boy suddenly disappeared.

He had fallen down an open sewerage maintenance hole, which he hadn’t seen in the dark.

He was eventually rescued by workers from the fish market, who brought a ladder. But because Fahim had been at least partially submerged underwater and without oxygen for several minutes, his brain suffered irreversible damage.

He was rushed by ambulance to Hamad Hospital and was declared brain dead by his doctor. Six days after the incident, he died of heart failure.

Court case

Sirajudeen told Doha News that over the following 18 months, court proceedings were brought against two defendants for their involvement in the incident: a senior official at the Ministry of Municipality and Urban Planning (MMUP); and MK Transport and Construction Company, which was a contractor working for MMUP at the market at the time.

The verdict was issued last month, on March 31, but the family only received it in written form yesterday.

According to court documents shared with Doha News, the first defendant, named in the court papers as Abdullah Mabrouk Al Mass Abdullah Al Saady (Abdullah Al Mass), was sentenced to one year in jail and ordered to pay the family QR200,000 in blood money as well as QR20,000 in fines to the court.

The second defendant, which was contracted at the time by MMUP to suck out sewage water from the sewers and put the lid back on afterwards, was acquitted by the court.

Grave negligence

Al Mass was the head of the MMUP’s sanitary and sewerage department and had been charged with negligence.

Issuing the verdict, the judge and head of court Abdullah Ali Al Emadi, found that Al Mass had neglected to make sure the sewage facilities in the Central Market were safe.

Lower criminal court in Doha
Lower criminal court in Doha

According to testimony from an MK Transport and Construction Co. employee, the sewer’s lid at the market was “old, light, not fixed on the sewer, corrosive and had rust around its edges.”

A worker for MMUP said that he had taken pictures of the lid in its bad state and notified the head of sanitary and sewage department at MMUP (Al Mass).

Because Al Mass did not forward the concern to maintenance, his “grave negligence” in doing his job led to the death of Fahim, Al Emadi said in his judgement.

The judge added that Al Mass should have undertaken routine checks on the sewage facilities to ensure they were safe and operating well.

When questioned, Al Mass said he “didn’t remember whether the MMUP worker notified him” of the problem or not.

Family reaction

Speaking to Doha News following the publication of the verdict, Sirajudeen said he was “satisfied” that action had been brought against Al Mass.

“Everyone is human, but they should know that whoever they are, if they make a mistake then they should be punished,” he said.

Sirajudeen, an accountant from India, said he had attended around seven hearings at Qatar’s lower criminal court. But because court sessions are held in Arabic and were without translation, it was difficult for him to follow proceedings.

“After 18 months of court hearings and all of this, we are glad it is over,” he added.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

However, he added that no verdict could take away the pain and suffering that he and his family continue to endure following the loss of their young son.

“What we have lost we can never get back. My wife cries every single day. There is nothing, nothing which can compensate for what has happened to us.

I never want something like this to happen to another family. I never want to share this sort of pain with another family.”

Sirajudeen, an accountant from India, said he wanted to highlight the facts in his case, however painful they are for his family, to raise awareness of the problem and to appeal to the Qatari authorities to ensure tough safety measures are put in place around buildings works and particularly holes in the ground.

“I want to spread awareness of the problem. I want the government to do something. Qatar is the richest country in the world. Their safety procedures should be perfect,” he said.

He added that simple measures such as putting barriers around the open hole and making sure the area was sufficiently lit could have shown up the open hole, and saved his son’s life.

“After this happened, people told us we weren’t looking after our son properly. But he was right with us. The area was dark – there were no lights at the time. We couldn’t see the hole,” Sirajudeen added.

Past accidents

Fahim’s was the third case of a child falling down an uncovered hole in Qatar in less than a year.

In November 2012, a three-year-old Jordanian boy fell into an 8m (26-foot) hole outside of an Al Sadd hotel, falling into a coma for three weeks before eventually passing away. That area had also been poorly lit.

And one month later, a three-year-old Omani girl was killed after falling into an open manhole near her home in Al Wakrah. Municipal workers conducting a cleanup apparently did not notice she had fallen in and secured the manhole cover before leaving for the night. She was found during a search of the area by neighbors.

Thoughts?

16 COMMENTS

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Expat
Expat
6 years ago

Hopefully this brings closure to the family! May he RIP!

Coco
Coco
6 years ago

Any contractor has also a moral responsibility not just legal/contractual. How is it that “MK Transport and Construction Company” got a project of this magnitude? Try googling them…

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago

Good… I love seeing gov’t officials who don’t carry out their jobs fined or jailed espically when their jobs entail the general public safety…

dn why selective in your reporting.. Something worth reporting on which is in all arabic paper today is the ministry of environment taking several construction comapines to court and each being fined 100,000 riyal plus the confiscation of their equipment and black listing them for the crimes of dumping construction rubbish in unauthorized locations, driving and working over environmentally protracted land… Dredging “stealing” sand in natural reserves .. And driving through natural reserves for plants and animals..

I think this is an important story to share

Coco
Coco
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

Do you have a link to the article? Maybe google translate will work on it so I can get an idea about it. Do they name the companies by any chance? Thanks.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

That certainly is a weighty story worthy of coverage. I think it might help to explain that we are a small team and it often takes time to investigate, compose and edit our stories, especially important ones like these. So rather than jump to conclusions about “selective coverage,” perhaps give us a bit more credit and time to do the work.

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

Fine mull it over …

AnonymityBreedsContempt
AnonymityBreedsContempt
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

You are my hero. Ignore the haters.

Shabzed
Shabzed
6 years ago

“When questioned, Al Mass said he “didn’t remember whether the MMUP worker notified him” of the problem or not” Ignorance at its highest form.

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago
Reply to  Shabzed

Honesty at its highest form

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

You only have to look at his family name to see why he was jailed. Although I applaud the authorities in this case, we all know what would happen if his family name had been of a different tribe. Justice should not be selective.

S
S
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

First you say that if that was a qatari he wouldnt face justice. Now that the authorities did arrest him your saying oh if hes from a different tribe it would have been different. Dont assume and dont be so negative all the time.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  S

Let’s look at the evidence. Qatar’s ambassador to Belgium and his wife both convicted but not in jail. Family names and father of the lady tell you all you need to know

Diego
Diego
6 years ago

In one Compound I had to go around and put the covers back on several times a week.I would complain and point out,but the truck drivers would come and use and never put the cover back on.It was heavy as well. I had to do this so my child would not be at risk.Problem is you can’t legislate thought and when there are those who don’t think, well its good to have the courts to remind them.

Jam
Jam
6 years ago

The contracting company/contractor in charge of this must be charged as well.

Joe
Joe
6 years ago

It is a shame that a human life was lost because of an obvious negligence.
Attitudes will not change in this region until Regulatory agencies big bosses and private sector fat cats are held accountable. The irony is that both sometimes merge or run by the same individual.

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