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Wednesday, October 20, 2021

As Qatar heats up, more residents at risk for Vitamin D deficiency

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Sun

Due to Qatar’s extreme seasonal heat, people living here typically spend less time outdoors in the summer, and thus get less sun – putting them at risk for Vitamin D deficiency.

Those lacking Vitamin D can experience a host of health-related problems, including fatigue, hair loss and depression.

To tackle the problem, Dr. Elham Sherif, assistant professor of Biomedical Sciences at QU’s Department of Health Sciences, is leading a new awareness campaign on the subject.

Vitamin D can be gleaned from sources other than the sun, including foods such as oily fish. But Sherif said you would need to eat this around five times a week to get to the recommended level of 30-80 nanograms/ml.

Speaking to Doha News, she said that’s why sun is the best prescription:

“Qatar has a problem – we estimate the majority of people in the country are deficient – and many seriously deficient – in Vitamin D.

“We are advising people that they need to expose their legs and arms – without sunblock, which reflects 99 percent of UVB rays –  to the sun for between 5 and 15 minutes a day, three times a week. This is the best way to get your levels up to the amount your body needs.”

Maintaining the right level of Vitamin D in your body has numerous health benefits, including hardening the bones (preventing osteoporosis) and boosting the immune system.

Vitamin D also has been found to have anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant properties, while a deficiency has been linked to mental health issues such as schizophrenia and dementia.

Data on Qatar

Recent studies state that the majority of people in Qatar may be lacking Vitamin D – which is in fact is not a vitamin at all, but a pro-hormone.

Prof Elham Sharif
Prof Elham Sharif

In a sample of female students at QU, Sherif found that only 2.8 percent had sufficient levels of Vitamin D (with 30 to 80ng/ml), while 51 percent were found to be severely deficient (with levels of less than 10ng/ml).

These results correlate with another study that took place in 2008, testing 340 healthcare workers at Hamad Medical Corporation for their levels of Vitamin D. Only five percent of the men tested and two percent of the women had desirable levels of Vitamin D.

Sherif said the results of these samples are reflective of Qatar’s wider society. She added that women – particularly covered women – and the elderly are more at risk for Vitamin D deficiency.

Qatar’s sometimes dusty weather also prevents the body from absorbing the nutrient, she said.

Tackling Vitamin D deficiency

Those who are found to be deficient can be treated with supplements prescribed by their doctor – either by injection for people whose levels are seriously low, or tablets.

However, Sherif said the key to reach and maintain the right levels of Vitamin D is most easily done through sun exposure, which also stores for longer in the body than supplements.

She recently organised an awareness-raising seminar for QU students about the issue, and is planning to host a major conference on the subject next year.

Do you get enough sun in Doha? Thoughts?

7 COMMENTS

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MN
MN
7 years ago

“Due to Qatar’s extreme seasonal heat, people living here typically spend less time outdoors in the summer, and thus get less sun – putting them at risk for Vitamin D deficiency.”

Lucky construction workers?!

outdoorsboys
outdoorsboys
7 years ago

We all seem to work from sun up to sun down in Qatar. Back in the UK, the days are long in summertime, so we can all get out and enjoy the sunshine( when it struggles through the clouds) every evening till late.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
7 years ago

It’s not surprise that the predominately Arab female population at Qatar University have vitamin D deficiencies. The problem is exacerbated in Qatar by the fact that local women tend to cover (thus making it harder to the suns rays to reach their bodies) and the general preference for lighter skin (discouraging women to be in the sunlight at all).

Absent of a drastic cultural change, the answer is either supplements through eating or getting sun lamps.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

All of the local population (males and females) has vitamin D deficiencies.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Interesting. I was always told that is was far more predominate in females.

Any ideas besides supplements? “Western” knee-jerk reaction is to tell people to wear less and go outside more often with less on, but that isn’t culturally sensitive.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

Do you see the males exposing their skin to the sun? We stay indoors, and we’re fully covered most of the time. Most men don’t check their health, and don’t care if the level is too low… 🙁

Flammable
Flammable
7 years ago

“We are advising people that they need to expose their legs and arms “… No Way..!! That’s against the culture 🙂

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