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Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Islamic scholar: Qatar ‘needs to take care’ of its foreign workers

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Asserting that migrant workers should not “lose their freedom for a piece of bread,” researchers and religious scholars have called on Qatar and other countries to improve foreigners’ treatment so that it is more in line with Islamic traditions and values.

In addition to overhauling its kafala sponsorship system, there needs to be a shift in attitudes so that foreigners are seen and treated as equals, panelists said last night during a discussion hosted by Qatar’s Research Center for Islamic Legislation and Ethics (CILE).

“We see (migrants) working for us … But there is no appreciation. There is no love dedicated to those people,” said Sheikh Ali Al Quradaghi, secretary general of the International Union of Muslim Scholars. “The earth was made for all creatures, all human beings, not one category of people,” he added.

Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies mosque
Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies mosque

The discussion at CILE, which is part of Hamad bin Khalifa University’s Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies (QFIS), comes as Qatar prepares to amend legislation that governs the relationship between expats and their sponsors.

While the specific reforms contained in the new law are not yet known, the original proposals drafted by government officials aimed to make it easier for foreigners to leave the country and change jobs.

Last night, Al Quradaghi praised Qatar’s leaders for their willingness to address the issue and, like other panelists, directed his recommendations to countries across the region with large expat populations and not just Qatar.

But he and the other speakers called for changes – such as paying individuals equally for doing the same work regardless of their nationality, compensating employees fairly as well as giving domestic workers the same rights as other migrants by including them under the Labor Law – that Qatar has so far been reluctant to consider.

‘We need to take care of these people’

To illustrate his argument, Al Quradaghi highlighted the actions of Omar Ibn al-Khattab.

When the second caliph after the Prophet Muhammad came upon an elderly Jewish man begging and asked why, the man said he had worked for 50 years but still needed money to pay for his basic needs.

Al Quradaghi recounted that Omar was surprised and instructed that money be given to the man because he had been treated unfairly during his working career – a move, Al Quradaghi suggested, that governments and employers in the region should take inspiration from.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

“Arab and Muslim countries ought to take care of those who provide long periods of service and participate in the building of these countries,” he said. “We need to take care of these people.”

Specifically, he said wage levels need to be examining in the context of the cost of living in nations such as Qatar.

“QR1,000 (a month), for example, in this country cannot be good enough,” he said.

There is no national minimum wage in Qatar. Instead, the government negotiates different salary levels with individual countries.

These bilateral agreements mean that workers are paid different amounts based on their nationality, said Latife Reda, a research consultant at the International Labor Organization in Lebanon.

Domestic workers

She told the audience last night that labor and workers’ rights are a “fundamental” part of Islamic traditions, including equal pay for equal work and the right to decent living and working conditions.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Reda specifically highlighted how domestic workers across the GCC as well as in countries such as Lebanon are not covered under the labor law.

Human rights organizations including Amnesty International have said this exclusion leaves maids, nannies and other household workers particularly vulnerable to exploitation and other abuse from their sponsors, as there are few checks against the power of the employer beyond the criminal justice system.

Reda recommended that domestic employees be covered by the labor law, which she argued would lead to these workers being included in other measures, such as social security reforms.

This was also one of the recommendations of Jabir Al Howaiel, director of legal affairs at Qatar’s National Human Rights Committee.

While also calling on the government to sign on to multiple international treaties and conventions dealing with migrant rights, Al Howaiel added that current challenges could not be solved through mandatory standards alone:

“Respect and dignity of humans should be part of our culture so every human can live with dignity and liberate himself from fear in an environment that is conducive to security and development,” he said. “Workers ought not to lose their freedom for a piece of bread. They need to live with dignity.”

For illustrative purposes only
For illustrative purposes only

In response to concerns about worker rights, some local organizations have introduced better housing and employment standards for its contractors.

This includes the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, which is overseeing the construction of Qatar’s World Cup stadiums and published a set of workers’ welfare standards to protect employees on its building sites.

Last week, the committee published an article based on its visits to the Midmac labor camp, which is home to the workers constructing Khalifa International Stadium, that concluded its policies were working:

“‘We made a final inspection just before they moved in and had a walk through,’ explained Megan Jenkins, SC Governance and Enforcement Manager, Workers’ Welfare…‘All of our comments and feedback got taken on board. It was like a 3D model of what we had written on paper coming to life. When you see how it can look and work, you realise we are on the right track with the Standards.’”

Last night’s panel discussion followed a workshop attended by migration and human rights experts aimed at exploring the role of Islamic legislation and ethics in how Arab countries deal with expatriates.

Rajai Ray Jureidini, a QFIS professor of ethics and migration who moderated last night’s event, told Doha News that he hoped the discussions would spur a series of academic papers that could eventually be compiled into a book.

Thoughts?

101 COMMENTS

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Kigz
Kigz
5 years ago

You should! Because without them qatar is disable. And you cannot deny the fact that most expats have better ideas, great thinker and doer! My opinion!!!

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Kigz

yeah, that’s why everything works just fine around here,
no traffic / less crime . LOL

WTF
WTF
5 years ago

Piety and humility vs. greed and arrogance, let’s see..,

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago

In other news Sheikh Ali Al Quradaghi was sent into exile on Halul island for 50 yrs.

AFT
AFT
5 years ago

This is an enlightened counsel, policy proponents and policy makers are hoped to have the guided wisdom in making the right response.

johnny wang
johnny wang
5 years ago
Reply to  AFT

Will the authorities atleast now take a note what everybody else thinks about their rules and policies which are to say the least abusive and not worker or employee friendly. In fact more often its the local laws and rules that are used and played around with to abuse and harass the workers. Just wondering if anybody is listening to the voices of reason and sanity or if they will continue with what they have been doing and getting away with all this years with the help and blessings of the authorities themselves

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  johnny wang

The council is a toothless puppet. It exists only to give the impression that real debate takes place in Qatar, and frankly it just heightens the absurdity of the situation given that it’s advice is ignored.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

& if they didn’t have the council you can say ( the aren’t being heard ) nothing works with you apparently . always the same negativity .

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

It is what it is here. Give the population all these benefits and cash, keep them docile as lambs, give them false sense they run their lives (council) thus no arab spring. all are fat, happy and unfortunately, lazy.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

calling people in Qatar lambs, thanks for sharing mentality so publicly

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I did NOT call them lambs. I said the gov’t likes to keep them docile as lambs. there’s a difference.

I’d rather use another animal that brays to describe the many I encounter on the roads.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

“all are fat, happy and unfortunately, lazy.”

Reem
Reem
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Yet another diversion — look over there! The dialogue is about the use and abuse of migrant workers into Qatar not about fat, ignorant Americans. Or are you telling us the Qataris are no different? Just as fat and ugly? I hope not.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Reem

Reem dear, perhaps you’ve missed the part where an American said that Qataris are “all are fat, happy and unfortunately, lazy.” Please ask him why he said that and then we can talk.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

More racism and diversion from the topic. More of the old argument of “one person of the millions in a particular country did something that I didn’t like so that excuses me/my country to be equally insulting/poorly behaved.” Outstanding logic. Not juvenile or hypocritical of at all.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

troll explaining . we get , now troll away from here

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Please give us an example where the Council’s advice has precipitated real change in the labour laws and subsequent working conditions. The fact is that this phoney PR-driven debate on changing the laws has gone on for years, and nothing tangible has yet come of it. With that history what possible reason has anyone to be positive?

Jam
Jam
5 years ago
Reply to  AFT

I salute Mr.Al Quradaghi for his wisdom and inspiring thoughts: the earth was made for all creatures, all human beings, not one category of people”.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago

The Kafala and the Labour laws define peoples perception of Qatar and the Qatari. That perception is really not good, but Qatar doesn’t seem in the least bothered. One assumes that the proceeds of oil and LNG and the individual wealth that they have brought have blinded and corrupted the modern-day Qatari, because I can’t believe that they acted this way 100 years ago when it was just a collection of pearl fishing villages.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

Money warps all sense of right, religion and many times human decency.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Isn’t “Money” the reason you live and work in country that
you’ve described as being “the most racist place that I know”? Just like not
all white people in the U.S. are rich, racist or Republicans, not all Qataris
are blinded by their country’s wealth 😉

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Then why do those that are not blinded remain silent?

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

By silent you mean that you, the center of the universe, have not heard them speak?!

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

But I don’t let it warp my sense of decency in either of those. I speak out to the point of once being threatened with deportation.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

A couple of points; 1) Do you understand the difference between a country’s government and its people? It’s important to know such a difference, especially if that said country is not a democracy.

2) If you go to some countries in South and East Asia, for example, you’ll often find that some of the same class of workers are also being treated poorly, in their own countries! As none of those countries are anywhere near as wealthy as Qatar, how do you account for that? Ironically, some of the most abused workers, including some that have been kidnapped and forced to work for free are working the fishing industry of all things!

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Human trafficking is a global problem. The Thai navy was recently accused of aiding and abetting the human traffickers who forced people into slavery in the fishing industry.

That said, another country’s wrongs do not excuse Qatar’s misdeeds. Qatar is clearly profiting as a country and society from the sufferings of these people, and only as a nation will it rectify the situation.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

Please feel free to reread my comment. Nowhere did I suggest
that, as you put it, “another country’s wrongs do not excuse Qatar’s
misdeeds.” I was responding to the point that the rise in wealth in Qatar
due to oil is the reason why “some” people seem to lack empathy toward the
suffering of their fellow human beings.

Elkhorn
Elkhorn
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Sorry, I can’t help myself. But you actually did. When you’ve mentioned South East Asian countries and they’re deplorable treatment of their own nationalities, you are making a comparison between them and Qatar.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Elkhorn

No, you cannot help it, can you? I’ll explain this one more
time; the Reporter is tying the mistreatment of workers to the wealth of Qatar.
I simply pointed out that the same mistreatment can be found even in countries
that are nowhere near as wealthy as Qatar. I really don’t know how to make this
any more clear.

Elkhorn
Elkhorn
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

But we’re talking about the point made by DavidRSS8 that despite being compared with these countries, Qatar should not be excused for its mistreatment of labors.

While I do admire you dedication in defending Qatar and while the country and its citizens have their good points. It is a religious mandate to respect and care about their workers / labors. Unless you are questioning the teaching of Islam itself?

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Elkhorn

Then you should address your point to DavidRSS8 because he’s the one making the false claim that I said others do it so it’s okay for Qatar. I’m not responsible for his and yours choosing to twist my words to mean something which I clearly didn’t say.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

It’s implied by the rhetoric defense of pointing out the wrongdoings of other nations and peoples in order to minimize your own. You are welcome to disagree.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

You are welcome to being argumentative and putting words in my mouth, as usual 😉

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

And you are welcome to complain any time someone disagrees with you or demonstrates the fallacy of your argument.

To honest, I’ve found a number of your recent posts to be surprisingly enlightening–for a change 😉

Have a good evening.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

So, trying to explain that you misread the meaning of what I said, that means I’m complaining because the person disagrees with me. Wow, just wow!

It really is pointless for any Qatari to try to have a rational discussion with you. Though on some occasions, when Qataris aren’t around, you do seem to make some good points.

Have a good life, and please don’t be too offended if I don’t pay much attention to what you think in the future.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Please explain the difference with regard to Qatar. Are you saying that the Qatari do not agree with their “government” but that without any democratic process they have no option other than to comply with it’s dictates? Sorry but I see no groundswell of protest in Qatar to anything that the “government” decides so I can only assume that the Qatari fully concur with them. The exploitation of the poor in other countries is, as someone pointed, out carried out outside of the laws of the land i.e. illegally by criminals – it is not enshrined in state law as in Qatar.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

You know what they say about “assume”; ass+u+me. It seems that your analysis of other people’s behavior, in this case Qataris, is based on what you personally would do if you were in their situation. Your way of thinking is that since you personally have not seen something, then itdoesn’t exist!

So I guess people who say all Jews are Zionists must be right, because, according to them, they have not seen any other kind. Same goes for all white Americans being racists, and so on. Get the picture?

As for the exploitation of the poor not being “enshrined in state law” in other countries, so, you’re saying all those people working in swat factories, the child laborers, etc. is illegal? Sorry, but I know otherwise. Furthermore, in Qatar’s case, the worst examples of exploitation of the foreign workers would be things like not paying them their salary or delay in doing so. That, and many other things are illegal, but the lack of proper enforcement is the real issue here as it is in the other countries you’ve mentioned.

Smile
Smile
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Abdulrahman, do you seriously think people will stop generalizing when they comment? well, unfortunately, i don’t think so. Generalizing people has become norm around the world not just in Qatar. Can we stop it? in my opinion, i don’t think so. You and i can only do our best.
However, we will continue to do our best to make people realise that it is not fair and acceptable to generalize thousands or millions of people…to put thousands or millions of people in the same basket and say they are all the same.I commented on this issue here on dohanews twice and obviously, i have not seen any changes in people opinion.
why would anyone judge, rate, assume something negative about me base on my Nationality, My country corrupt politicians and constitution, my country under-develop environment, physical appearance, colour, language, religion, the cloth i wear…just looking at me from afar? hmmmm

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Smile

You’re right people will always generalize and be idiots about it. Does that mean we should just sit back while they spew their ignorance about us? I don’t think so.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Don’t follow your logic at all. I don’t know the difference between a Jew and a Zionist so that’s lost on me. I know there are moderate Jews and radical Jews if that’s what you mean. Are you saying that many Qataris disapprove of the labour laws? Is this disapproval censored and if not where can we see it or hear it? If we can’t then why should we believe that that it exists? Tell me a country where child labour is legal. As for not paying or delaying payment of salary, it is rife in Qatar and it is illegal. To reiterate, my point was not the illegal acts that exploit people but that the laws of a land are written to enable the legal exploitation of people – as in Qatar – and that the lack of any real protest against the laws suggest to me that the Qatari nation as a whole does not disapprove of those laws enough to mount any form of protest against them. From my (liberal western) perspective nothing could be worse than that. Do you personally disapprove of the current laws? If so then stand up and protest. If not then how do you expect anyone to believe that there is genuine opposition?

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

100 years ago, slavery was legal in Qatar, so there have been some improvements in human rights. That said, there were far fewer slaves then than there are mistreated workers today.

La'quansha
La'quansha
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

Maaan, were you even alive back then? Stop your lyin’ if you ain’t seent it with your own godd*mn eyes!!!

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  La'quansha

So, kinda like every religious belief on the planet then?

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

or gravity / air / ozone layer around the world ,some physic theories (LOL) .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Difference being that we demonstrate them, we can’t demonstrate mythical beliefs. LOL

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  La'quansha

Are you serious? Slavery was legal in Qatar until the mid-20th century (1952). Feel free to look it up.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

100 years ago , their was no state of Qatar , please google before you write stuff.
100 years ago people around the world had salves .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Ha, in my lifetime slavery was legal in Qatar. 100 years ago slavery was illegal in all of Europe and North America, though still widely practiced in the Arab world.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

which was under the /brits/french..,you were saying

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Yes, the colonial powers were, sadly, very good at co-opting the existing Arab slave trade until they abolished. It is sad that they didn’t force the Trucial States to abolish it.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

yeah & no salve were used in countries like US / INDIA / South Africa / Australia …. they were very good to the white Race for sure . use words better , hypocrisy don’t work here.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

It took a bloody civil war to end slavery in the U.S. And
then it took some 100 years or so before African Americans got equal rights and
were able to vote, go to the same schools as whites, shop at the same shops too,
and not fear being lynched in the streets by angry whites.

When slavery ended in Qatar that was it. Former slaves
shared the same public space as their fellow citizens.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

It depends on your perspective of what constitutes slavery. Qatar has a regime that knowingly and deliberately prevents the free and competitive movement of labour, and thus facilitates the exploitation of labour by employers. That, by modern standards is slavery.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

according to you , nobody else calls it that . you are coming from where you see negativity always . please don’t spread it here .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Except that many others call it that. Oh, the US State Department, the UN, etc.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

US ?? are you serious , haha the country that made its own lies to invade countries as they wish, really , look for something that has better ” RECORD in honesty/ human rights) please .

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

Okay, then please explain this to me: why do educated enlightened expats such as yourself agree to live and work in a country that practices, as you put it, modern day slavery?

After all, don’t the companies you work for use these exploited workers? Aren’t the villas you live in being serviced and maintained by them. The shops you go to? The gas station? etc.

What, is the money so good that people are comprising on their principles?

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Yep your knowledge of history is correct. And? The slavery mindset is still very alive and well in that country. It is on display every time I visit. Hopefully it will die out, but it hasn’t yet.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

( A RECORD IN Honesty/HUMAN RIGHTS ) LOL

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

It’s always easy to point the finger at the flaws of others and magnify them by using hyperboles and big words. On the other hand, the same people downplay the same or similar problems that we have and act as if they’re
not a big deal.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

I think you’ve just described your line of argument and that of your friend.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

Yes, I’m sure that’s how you see it.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Except Friday at the malls, any public celebrations where they’re not allowed, etc etc

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Yeah, and I’ll bet you love shopping there on those days 😉

Say, are the cops back home still arresting and shooting black people without probable cause?

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

“When slavery ended in Qatar that was it.” Except, of course, that decades later they began to import people who are, by the definitions of most human rights organization, slaves, which is, in part, the point of the article.

That aside, what bothers me the most is that while you criticize the U.S. on its racial history, the only reason you know about it is that it is a hugely discussed topic in the media, in the classroom, etc. People of all colors have marched, protested and rioted for equal rights–including literally millions of whites. Yet in Qatar, which is partly the point of the article, Qataris are not public in their disownment of globally condemned system of labor. Sure, some (including yourself) admit privately that the system is distasteful, but very very few publicly condemn it, and I have yet to see anything even remotely on a par with the reaction to ongoing racism in the U.S. I’ve the sanctioned history of Qatar textbooks. Not a lot about slavery–to say the least.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

100 years ago slavery had already been banned in much of the world–including the Americas, Europe, etc. Feel free to google it.

Qatar existed 100 years ago as a people, society, and kingdom, ruled by the same family in power today. Feel free to google it for your write such drivel.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

which was under the /brits ruling so..,you were saying .

BTW slavery ended in the WEST BUT NOT RACISM ,still there.(google cops killing black/church killing) talking about something happened in Qatar before there was a STATE, is like talking about america before the US. , ( feel free to google the Independence date of Qatar .)

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Indeed, racism, be it in Qatar or other countries is disgusting. What is your point?

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

So you are saying that the ruling family the people of Qatar had no say over their own governance and that the events of 1878 celebrated in National Day are irrelevant? What a bad patriot you are.

BTW–Britain did not rule Qatar. Qatar was an kingdom that was a protectorate of the Empire. The U.S. before independence were a series of colonies, which is fundamentally different. If Britain truly ruled Qatar, slavery would have been abolished just as it was in the British colonies in the 1830s. You really need to read and think before you post. You’d probably need to do more than google to learn this, but feel free to learn up and study.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

like they were abolished lets say in south Africa / Australia / India .. all under the good Brits.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Qatari – stop going back into history because it has no relevance to the argument. If you go back far enough you’ll find that every country in the world used slavery and exploitation – and my country UK was as bad as any other. But this is the 21st Century, and human rights have progressed in the last 100 years as they’ve never done in all the previous centuries. By today’s standards Qatar practices slavery, and every human-rights organisation uses exactly that word to describe it..

Dawa Chedup
Dawa Chedup
5 years ago

A good work done. But sad for people like me who works for 10 hours and are paid QR1100 monthly salary

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Dawa Chedup

Don’t worry, they said they would equalise your salary with other nationalities. Just hope they don’t pick Ethopia….

Jam
Jam
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

sounds racist uh…

Michkey
Michkey
5 years ago

Waiting for MIMH to comment on this, he seemed rather condescending when I argued for the necessities of institutions like QFIS.

Pete
Pete
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

He must be travelling…this story was posted 4 hours ago.

MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Pete

Jokes on you, I’m always here. I live right outside DN HQ, on the doormat.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

or have no life without DN ,just saying

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

That’s my alter ego, immitation is the sincerest form of flattery……

If you cannot defeat them in argument, either threaten or try to undermine them. Luckily I don’t care!

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
5 years ago
Reply to  Pete

Deleting for lack of relevance to the story.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

We don’t need religious institutions which have poor records on human rights and moral teachings (all of them) to know what is the right thing to do.

Only this week we had an Islamic conference in Paris that was interrupted by femen while two ‘scholars’ we’re debating if it was ok to hear your wife. That is not even a f@”&”&@ debate!

Kz
Kz
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Femen- that publicity hungry “activists”. They just need another excuse to strip naked cause tou jnow by stripping naked all the problems facing the women will disappear.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Kz

The conference gave demonstrations on acceptable famine things to do like shopping and cooking and debating whether acceptable to beat your wife. If that is not worth protesting about I don’t know what is.

MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Kz

I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to go off on you like that. The thing is, I’m not a religious woman myself, so I tend to get carried away when discussing religion. The last time I picked up a holy book was when Princess Diana had died, that was a tough time for me.

Michkey
Michkey
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

comment image

NotHim
NotHim
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

More like give him the D.

The Reporter
The Reporter
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

MIMH I think your computer turned “beat” into “hear.” The conference was discussing the pros and cons of beating your wife.

MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

On second thought, I got nothing.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Hello alternate me!

MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Quick, let’s make it look like I lost it.

Or take over DN together. Huzzah!

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago

But owning and trading slaves is part of Islamic culture and values as stated in the Koran it is permissible. Are they now cherry picking the Koran and leaving out the nasty bits or are they trying to move Islam into the 21 Century?

If it is the latter I salute them

WTF
WTF
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

All religions cherry pick from their holy books. In Christianity, aren’t they telling you that certain parts of the Bible should not be taken literally? Christians don’t stone homosexuals or rebellious youth, do they?

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  WTF

Of course they do, parts of Leviticus are disgusting.

Kz
Kz
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Like people care about what you have to say. A troll whose life revolves around making some crap commnets over here.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Kz

Well tell me that is not true then?

MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Kz

Stop it. You’re being mean to me.

You must think I’m Dolce Gabbana, but I’m actually smart like Shabana.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
5 years ago
Reply to  Kz

Deleting for attack.

Omar Alansari
Omar Alansari
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Just a note.

it was permissible for warfare reasons only. it does not make any sense that other empires -at that time when it was ok everywhere- take Muslims as slaves after a war lost and Muslims don’t do the same.

Islam limited the sources of slaves that existed before the beginning of the Prophet’s mission to one way only: enslavement through war

it created many new ways of liberating slaves, blocked many ways of enslaving people, and established guidelines which blocked these means.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  Omar Alansari

Yep, better go tell those running the ISIS slave trade. They seem to do a pretty good job justifying their actions from mainstream Sunni thought. You see the problem on the issue – you can say one thing, but the same texts equally justify what those folks are doing.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  Omar Alansari

That is true, even the Bible OKs owning slaves under certain conditions. However you would have thought a book of revelations for all mankind would have been more enlightened. It took man to end the slave trade not God. Man 1, God 0.

Reem
Reem
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Yes, it took Humankind and reason to end slavery and hopefully all these so-called oldest professions.

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