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Monday, September 27, 2021

Report: Qatari families earn almost three times as much as expats

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Qataris at Souq Waqif

The average Qatari household earns QR72,700 ($19,918) a month, nearly three times the average expat household income of QR24,400 ($6,685), new figures from the Ministry of Development and Planning Statistics (MDPS) show.

When taking into account housing, free electricity and water, the Qatari income figure increases to QR88,200 ($24,164).

The figures come ahead of a new MDPS publication on Household Expenditure and Income Survey for 2012/13, which is expected to be released in full next month.

The survey’s findings are based on information compiled from 3,723 households between September 2012 and September 2013. Just over half the households were expat (1,897), while the remainder were Qatari (1,826).

Each household was asked to keep a daily diary of their income and outgoings for one month.

The average Qatari household surveyed was made up of 8.7 people, more than twice the size of the average expat household of 4.3 people – a difference that may help explain the expenditure and earnings gaps between the two groups.

Five-year comparison

The figures also show that a Qatari household will spend on average QR49,600 ($13,589) a month, while the average expat household will spend QR18,000 ($4,932).

The expenditure marks 21.5 percent increase for Qataris compared to 2007 figures, in which the average household spent QR40,800/month ($11,178).

For expats, the increase was even more marked, with expenditure going up by 35 percent from 2007, when expenses were QR13,329/month ($3,652).

However, the past seven years represent a slower increase in expenditure than the 2001 to 2007 period, when the average monthly spend by Qatari families rose by a staggering 82.2 percent (from QR22,400 per month to QR40,800), according to the MDPS Qatar Social Statistics 2003-2012 report.

The report also shows that in 2012-13, salaries and wages made up almost all (97 percent) of the average expat household income, while it accounted for just two-thirds (67 percent) of the average Qatari monthly income.

Detailed results

According to the latest survey results, the average expat household spends more than one-third of its monthly outgoings on rent (QR6,177).

Meanwhile, the biggest single expense for the average Qatari household is transport and communications, which account for one-fifth of its monthly budget (QR9,560).

Food is the next biggest expense for both Qataris and non-Qataris, taking up 16 percent (Qr8,033) and 15 percent (QR2,700) of outgoings, respectively.

Dining out took up the biggest single spend on food costs across the board, with Qataris spending nearly a quarter of their food bills in restaurants (QR1,922 a month), and expats almost one-third (QR852).

Rising cost of living

According to the report, other monthly spending habits included:

  • Traveling abroad: Qatari households spent QR5,711 (11.5 percent), while expats spent QR1,648 (9 percent)
  • Clothes and shoes: Qataris spent QR2,800 (5.7 percent); expats spent QR621 (3.4 percent)
  • Personal care: Qataris spent QR2,536 (5 percent); expats spent QR404 (2 percent)
  • Education: Qataris spent QR1,571 (3 percent); expats spent QR1,008 (5.6 percent)
  • Medical care: Qataris spent QR1,523 (3 percent); expats spent QR178 (1 percent)
  • Tobacco, cigarettes and alcohol: Qataris spent QR80 (0.16 percent); expats spent QR69 (0.4 percent).

Some of the increased expenditure could be explained by the ongoing rise in cost of living in Qatar.

The consumer price index (CPI) – which measures the average cost of goods and services – continues to be on the rise in Qatar.

MDPS figures for February 2014 showed a rise of 2.7 percentage points on the cost of the same basket of goods one year before.

Prices were pushed higher in particular by a nearly 6 percent rise in the cost of rent, fuel and energy.

And overall, Qatar’s rate of inflation in May 2014 was recorded at 3.4 percent.

Here’s the full press release:

Thoughts?

105 COMMENTS

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Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago

Are you sure about this info?
“Tobacco, cigarettes and alcohol – Qataris spent QR80 (0.16 percent), expats spent QR69 (0.4 percent).”
The Peninsula mentioned a completely different figure, which is the following:
“It is interesting to note that Qatari families spent more on tobacco,
cigarettes and alcoholic drinks on average a month (QR7,983) than their
expatriate counterparts (QR6,921).”
http://thepeninsulaqatar.com/news/qatar/288227/qatari-family-earns-qr72-700-a-month-survey

And some Qataris on Twitter are already angry at being associated with alcohol consumption, and asking to mention cigarettes and alcohol separately 🙂

Chilidog
Chilidog
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I wondered the same thing, especially since the stated monthly spend for both groups is about the cost of one drink at a lot of the hotels. I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I believe the local newspaper more in this case.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

Average guys, average. I’m not saying the survey is completeley accurate. But for every family that spends a lot on dining outside, there will be families who don’t even eat outside or spend a lot less than the average. Just wish they would actually provide on how many were surveyed to find these stats. But, the stats should be in this region more likely than not, in my opinion.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Agree about separating tobacco and alcohol, they’re often lumped together but in the case of Qatar makes perfect sense (and respectful) to separate them

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

I do agree but their reaction on Twitter was more about how to punish “those expats who are employed in our government institutions and dare to tarnish our reputation with their own habits”!!! I find it a bit extreme from them isn’t it? 🙂

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

well, twitter…

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

It’s hip ( or whatever the latest slang is) to voice your opinion on topics which you have no knowledge about, on twitter.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Why stop at voicing your opinion? Why not call for a boycott?

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Twits will Tweet?

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Tell them what they want to hear not the truth, or you will be punished!

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

I know one Qatari who likes to drink at one of the local bars and he drops 3000 to 5000 QR most nights on some pretty expensive beverages. Keeps himself to himself and he is not hurting anyone, must be him who helps keep the average up….

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

And pays his maid how much in comparison to his 35,000 QR a week habit?

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

I guess he probably has no idea how much all his maids get paid, he probably has someone to look after that for him.

He doesn’t drink a lot, but he does drink the best stuff available….

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

So indulge me, what is worth that much money if not drinking a lot? Just interested.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Usually cognac at 1500 QR a shot and 20 year old scotch at a 1000 QR.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

WOW….one month wages in a gulp….really wow…thanks for the insight.

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I have a bottle of 18yr old Single Malt that didn’t cost that much! Smooth as velvet…

The cognac is normally just kept for flambé 😉 I’ll have a Klippies and Coke met eish!

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

Alcohol, tobacco and firearms are always in the same category for these kinds of ‘surveys’

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Gareth Walters

And here I thought that way just an Agency in the US…

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

Yes it is, it is the agency that deal with taxation of these products. but it is not only in the US. as Qatar doesn’t have taxation there would be no need for this kind of department here.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

So those guys in the thobes and gutra in the Oryx, the Raddison, etc drinking beer wine spirits are not Qatari’s?

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

I never said there are no Qataris who drink alcohol, but as a nation it’s uncommon, and many Qataris genuinely consider it haram, so this grouping makes no sense

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

So you say have it stand alone in the survey? If so then it will still cause the same reaction from the Qatari community when they see that it is included and surveyed. You cant have a comparative survey done and have one item for one but not for the other. It’s a no win situation unless they remove alcohol for both Qatari and expats.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

you know what, I don’t really care

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

No neither do I really…seems a little bit precious.

٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

I’ve had this conversation with many Qatari friends, the response I always get is “For a Muslim, drinking alcohol is haram, if an individual chooses to drink alcohol then they are not a Muslim”

I don’t know if this view is shared by everyone, but as I said it is consistent with multiple conversations.

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago

Actually this is completely wrong. Drinking alcohol does not make you a “kafir”, an infidel or let’s say a non-muslim to make it simple. And you can ask anyone with some knowledge of Islam and they will tell you.
Bear in mind that most Arabs and Muslims know little about Islam. Sometimes their ignorance is shocking. Have you seen the videos mocking Americans’ ignorance in geography and history (there are few popular ones on Youtube)? You can do a similar video about Muslims and their ignorance of their religion, and you will get similar hilarious responses.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I just looked those youtube videos up, hilarious

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVz4VweMqFE

٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

This came up in conversation again last night whilst watching Spain’s early exit from the World Cup. The group’s general consensus (mixture of ages, nationalities and religions) was that in Islam alcohol is classified as an intoxicant and in being so is therefore the work of Satan and thus considered haram. It was then stated by multiple individuals that if a Muslim chooses to partake in activities that are haram then ultimately they are choosing to abondon their faith and can no longer be considered Muslims, this seemed a little harsh to me but was interesting to listen to their opinions.

This is not my personal view as I have very little knowledge or interest in an individuals personal choice, however I find it interesting that there seems to be conflicting opinions on the subject.

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago

Maybe they’re like Catholics, sin during the week and on Sunday seek absolution and forgiveness. I understand to forgive is Divine? 3 Hail Marys and 2 Our Fathers and you’re done… 😉

٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
٩(͡๏̯͡๏)۶
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

I always felt a lot happier when I had a “get out of jail free” card tucked away in my back pocket whilst playing monopoly 🙂

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

So why do Turkish, Indonesion, etc Muslims drink alcohol?

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

On June 14 we read a Doha News story that showed that 86% of Qatari youth are “concerned” or “very concerned” about the rising cost of living in Qatar, and 68% are “concerned” or “very concerned” about unemployment in Qatar.

Fast forward 4 days, and we are presented with a finding that the average Qatari family is pulling in triple the income of the average expat family.

If the Qataris are complaining about rising costs of living while still spending about 2000 Qar a month on takeaway, 2,500 a month on ‘body care’, 2,800 a month on new clothes… you have to wonder…

Victoria Scott
Victoria Scott
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Hello there,

The statistics we have quoted were provided to us by MDPS. We have rounded them up above – they are, specifically, 79.83 for expat families and 69.21 for Qatari families (the same figures as used by Peninsula, but with the decimal point in a different place.) These figures tally with the percentage of monthly expenditure as provided by the govt – 0.16 and 0.38 percent of monthly spending. If the figures were higher, i.e 7,983 and 6,921, they would represent a far larger chunk of monthly expenditure.

Anon
Anon
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I thought tobacco was haram too…?

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Yes. It was allowed initially but was declared haram later (starting from the late 1960 and early 1970s) when scientists discovered how harmful it is for the body.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Yep it is….but hey??????????

Mohammed Albanai
Mohammed Albanai
7 years ago
Reply to  Anon

depends on who you ask, many scholars forbid it. its not as clear as alcohol

MN
MN
7 years ago

Food prices, rents and services are the same for everybody, and yet they make 3 times more (while sometimes being underqualified for the job). Inequality much?
Everybody knows that’s not gonna change. However, things would look a lot better if salaries could keep up with the living costs through steady yearly increases.

NP
NP
7 years ago
Reply to  MN

Citizens earn more than expats. Where’s the inequality?

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  MN

I don’t understand your logic, sounds like you are jealous. As an expat you choose to come here and you could go to another country if it was more benefical to you. However where are Qataris going to go? To India to find a job??? Or the Philiipines???

BBCA
BBCA
7 years ago
Reply to  MN

so what… People keep coming…

Amali
Amali
7 years ago

Are you sure this is accurate information?
How many people per Qatari household? 1?

Amali
Amali
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

With all due respect, that was not to offend anyone but surely this information is not true!

AEC
AEC
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

It’s not a matter or true or false but rather just the results of a particular survey the methodology of which hasn’t been very muched discussed so far.

Amali
Amali
7 years ago
Reply to  AEC

I understand, but i dont think any of this information is accurate, unless it is specified how many per household i would understand. I am an expact and alone i spend more than 650 riyals on “Clothes & Shoes” per month. We are 4 in the family.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

You have to realise that it is an average which includes poorer expat families as well. Your family doesn’t need to fall in the average. Good for you if you are above the average.

Amali
Amali
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

2,000 families do not represent the Qataris and Expats in Doha,

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

I just re-read the article and yes, the number surveyed is 3723 households which adds up to 24043 people surveyed for a population of just over 2 million puts the surveyed percentage at 1.2 approximately. So, yes this is just a horrible survey and of not any real value other than to watch the entertaintment from the bashing that occurs in the comments.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

No surveys survey more than 1% of the population, in other countries much less, its just too labour intensive and expensive, unless it is a national census. The surveys are meant to be indicative and provide a snapshot.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

1% of the population from a proper distribution sample in larger countries might make provide indicative figures. But when you are talking about the highly distorted local vs expat percentages that are present here along with the smaller population size. This 1% doesn’t really give you any sort of indication to actual numbers. How did they select this 1%? ( Randomly? Area- Wise? ).

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Don’t know the methodology behind it, do we have a link to the actual survey report itself? That should tell us.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Can’t find the methodology in the actual report either –

http://www.qsa.gov.qa/eng/News/2014/related/53/Income_and_expenditure_2014.pdf

But I found the graph on page 4 to be quite interesting to say the least.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Whoever opened their door and agreed to fill in the forms…

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Its a bit like door-to-door salesmen, they only make money when you open the door… or those annoying folks who peddle books from the WatchTower press, I normally stay in my box and peer through the letter slot at them, creeps them out it does! 🙂

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

We refused to fill in the details they requested. The guy tried to pressure: “You have to”, “It’s your country”, “The amir ordered it”…

I don’t trust any surveys, period.

sadam
sadam
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

ever heard of sample size? that’s just how statistics work.

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

The you buy too many shoes ;-)…

Actually to be able to compare it realistically, instead of gross sums they should report it per capita in the household, including any helpers / carers, as they add to consumption.

But does it matter, really?

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

As my wife told me a long time ago, a woman can never have enough shoes

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

She was lying to you mate, unless she’s a centipede she can only wear one pair at a time 😉

Man up and say no…. right I’ll get back in my box now before the wife finds out 😛

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
7 years ago
Reply to  Amali

As it was reported in The Peninsula: “The average size of a Qatari family covered was 8.7 individuals, while that of an expatriate household, 4.3. The average of both the family sizes was 5.5 individuals, said the Ministry.”

Amali
Amali
7 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Woops! Even worse! Haha

AEC
AEC
7 years ago

How do Qataris spend less on education?

Firas Zirie
7 years ago
Reply to  AEC

Because it’s free? Barring international schools – school and university education is free.

Technically, university education is usually sponsored by a Qatari company, but the vast majority of students are able to secure a sponsorship with ease.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  AEC

I think this is the case for many countries, each foreign nationality pays a premium for education as their preferred choice of school/curriculum is limited

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  AEC

They do just look at the PISA scores! It says it all.

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
7 years ago

I wonder if there will be any Qataris complaining about racism with regard to their salaries being three times higher than anyone else…

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Gareth Walters

Per “household”, with the “household” twice as big….

Huzz
Huzz
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Cut back on having children. Get a hobby instead. The upside would be that with fewer children one could put enough child seats into the Lexus 570. – I jest of course. – the damage to the leather would be too much.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

LOL. spoken like a true non-Qatari. 😉

Huzz
Huzz
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Indeed. Just some lighthearted stereotyped fun poking. Hopefully no offence taken.

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
7 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

making children is a perfectly acceptable hobby

sadam
sadam
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

kindly please enlighten us about the average household .. usually does a ‘ Qatari household’ typically mean a ‘nuclear family’ or ‘extended family’ …for expat households it’s usually nuclear–just parents and children..

sadam
sadam
7 years ago
Reply to  sadam

nvm thanks. found it
Michael Fryer Amali • 18 hours ago

As it was reported in The Peninsula: “The average size of a Qatari family covered was 8.7 individuals, while that of an expatriate household, 4.3. The average of both the family sizes was 5.5 individuals, said the Ministry.”

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  sadam

A real example: One house: “A grandfather, two grandmothers, two fathers, three mothers, 9 ‘children’…” … 7 make money. The grandfather, one father, one mother, and some of the “children” (over 18).

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

6 maids, 4 drivers, 2 gardeners, 3 cooks…..

Saleem
Saleem
7 years ago
Reply to  Gareth Walters

Any nation reserves the right to support its citizens the way it sees fit and to label it as “racism” is just foolish and conveys to me your lack of understanding of how States function, and what “racism” in fact is. These benefits are reserved only for Qataris and not all Arabs too, hence it cannot be “racist”, just as it is not racist when America makes it a priority that jobs are given to Americans before foreigners for example.

A gun was not held to your head to make you agree to the employment package you receive, so making sarcastic remarks about locals benefits reveals nothing but your bitterness about others good fortunes, as their earnings have no impact on your earnings.

Gareth Walters
Gareth Walters
7 years ago
Reply to  Saleem

awwww bless, i think you missed the point 🙁

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Saleem

Ditto most remarks equated to racism – anywhere.

They don’t refer to differences based on race but nationality, or religion. However ‘racism’ has become a ‘catch all’ phrase to be used as an easy excuse whenever there is a difference of opinion, no matter how flimsy?

‘Blatant discrimination’ would be a better phrase? Also comprehensively illegal in UK.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Saleem

What flavour Shisha are you smoking my man? its called discrimination, same job, different pay because of your nationality, skin colour etc, ask the UN…….anyway what flavour again?

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  Gareth Walters

and I am sure they cannot make it ’till the end of the month…..real problems!

Chilidog
Chilidog
7 years ago

“Earn,” as in “earn through actual work?” Wonder what the numbers would look like (actually, I have a guess) if the data was presented in terms of hourly wage based on actual hours worked. Or would that be a bit too embarassing (not racist, of course)?

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

Sure, let’s compare the actual work done, and compensation for it, by all employed people and see how they stake up. I wonder for example, how would Indian and Filipinos compare to Europeans and North Americans 😉

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Article seems a little divisive doesn’t it.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Since no one has said it yet, can I be the first to play the racism card?

greg
greg
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

You insinuate that the actual work is done only by Indians,Filipinos,Europeans and North Americans

johnny wang
johnny wang
7 years ago

Just wondering how those guys around who get paid less then a thousand and that too after their wages are kept on hold for two or three months get by in such statistics, surveys, etc

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  johnny wang

These stats are for families. Those guys are the “bachelors”.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Can a bachelor enter a survey ? Or will he be stopped by another bachelor at the door?

HV
HV
7 years ago

Such surveys with small sample sizes and vastly different comparison group ( 8 member families vs 4 member families, “expats” which would obviously include those from a wider range of income groups vs Qatari’s etc ) CANNOT give data that’s worth discussing. Please dont treat this as anything more than fiction!

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago
Reply to  HV

No it is not fiction and the sample size is representative: around 3500 households half of them Qataris and the other expats.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago

I wonder how long before this story explodes into an endless argument and bashfest. Probably before 5 pm 😉

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Indeed, brace yourself… Although at some point people will get tired of arguing? Never mind, forget I said that

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

Some dont ever get tired of it and it seems to be there sport.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

LOL…. shouldn’t the man be wearing a gutra with love it or leave it writing on the side of his chair…

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Really was not thinking of her (LoLi is a she, right?). Just a general cartoon, not referring to anyone in particular 😉

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

5pm, optimism, I like it… 😉

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

I find the figures for Qataris quite low, if that is what the average Qatari spends then they are unable to fund their lifestyle. This happens to be the case and then they have to top it up with easy bank loans.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

“Tobacco, cigarettes and alcohol – Qataris spent QR80 (0.16 percent), expats spent QR69 (0.4 percent).”

I spend more than that in my first minute in QDC, by the time I am finished I make that average look like the GDP of Mali……

Anon
Anon
7 years ago

These expats surveyed sound like me, but what about the majority expats? Those in labour camps earning 500 QR a month would shake these stats up a bit……I suppose it does say ‘average household income’ which kind of excludes those who don’t actually live in a house, but some sort of exploitative hovel camp, but these kind of surveys are a little misleading in that they give the impression to outsiders that most expats have these kind of incomes and expenditures, when clearly the minority groups have been surveyed and it doesn’t reflect the experience of most expats here.

BBCA
BBCA
7 years ago

So what… its their country. Don’t come if you cant accept the world you want to live in. If I were Qatari… I’d be all about this situation and flub my nose at those that complain. Countries like New Zealand need to observe this scenario and learn how to take care of their people with the new found wealth in natural resources. Qatar… I ain’t mad at cha! LOL!

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago

Coroner’s report says he died of laughter!! And we found this
newspaper with him!

(Old Man) On Social assistance

(Newspaper) Monthly income of Qatari family is 88,000

Misha
Misha
7 years ago

How is this survey beneficial when key information is missing and possible explanations are not discussed?!
There is no information (in the 45 page study) on how the participants were selected to determine if the sample is indeed a representation of the population.

Data should have been broken down into appropriate nationality categories (reality is this determines your benefits in a lot of companies) and as well as job sectors and job position categories.

Also regarding the household income, does this mean the primary breadwinner or combined income of working members of the families (single working qataris live in their parents/family homes).

A possible explaination of higher spending on food could (emphasis on could) be due to the customary practice of paying the bill for the group when dining out or even if food is provided to domestic workers who live in the house.

If those kinds of details are provided maybe then this study can be used for something other than fueling the “locals vs expats” fire.

Mag Num Opus
7 years ago

I would not mind being either Qatari family or even an expat!
http://magnumopus.manifo.com

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