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Friday, July 30, 2021

Modest dress campaign revived with new ‘You matter in Qatar’ slogan

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Reflect You Respect event at Villaggio in 2014
Reflect You Respect event at Villaggio Mall in 2014

A local campaign to promote modest dress in public places is entering its fourth summer with a new slogan, and an expanded focus that includes the clothing and behavior of Qataris as well as expats.

When the grassroots initiative to call attention to how people dress began in 2012, it was dubbed “One of Us.”

But the name was changed last year to “Reflect Your Respect,” based on feedback from some non-Qataris. Now, the campaign has returned with a new message: “You matter in Qatar.”

Previously, organizers increased their efforts during Ramadan, drawing attention to the clothing of non-Qatari tourists and residents, and advising them how to dress without offending local values and culture.Reflect Your Respect

Leaflets showed pictograms of appropriate and offensive levels of dress and groups of mostly women and children visited shopping malls and parks, handing out literature, shawls and chocolates.

Though Qatar is a conservative Islamic country, the law does not define modest dress.

Article 57 of the Qatari constitution states that “abiding by public order and morality, observing national traditions and established customs is a duty of all who reside in the State of Qatar or enter its territory.”

However, the group behind the modesty campaign has said that women and men should cover at least their shoulders and knees, and not wear tight, revealing or provocative clothing.

This year’s events

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

As the weather heats up and Ramadan approaches, volunteers will continue to circulate their message in malls, a spokeswoman for the group told Doha News.

Umm Abdullah added that members of the campaign have been trying to talk to Qataris in public places to reinforce the group’s message of modesty in all aspects of life.

This was in response to comments during previous campaigns that some expats felt they were being singled out while other behaviors in society were ignored, she said, continuing:

“Our campaign is not only about dress code. It is about supporting modesty in all behaviors in the state, for men and women.

Foreigners said to us: ‘why do you attack us, and Qataris are wearing perfume, heavy makeup, tight pants, high heels.’ We are addressing everyone. I speak to Qatari people too, telling them how to dress properly in public places like malls and hospitals,” she told Doha News.

The group has also revised its branding this year, in an effort to be more inclusive and to convey their message more positively, Umm Abdullah said.

Campaign T shirt
Campaign T shirt

T-shirts, leaflets and literature have been designed with a heart symbol and show images in a circle, with the words: “You matter in Qatar: Respecting the customs and traditions of this country that welcomes all guests.”

“We are trying to make it more appealing to people from all countries. This year, we want to focus on advising people what they can wear, not so much what they can’t wear,” she added.

Volunteers from “Reflect Your Respect” have organized talks, workshops and seminars with children in local schools as well as with local international women’s groups in a bid to raise awareness of the issue of modest dress.

The group also held an event at Katara Opera House last Friday, which featured talks and short skits performed by some pupils from independent schools in Qatar regarding modest dress code and behavior.

Photos of the event show that Katara’s General Manager, Dr. Khalid Ibrahim Al Sulaiti, along with the Libyan Ambassador to Qatar Abdel Monsef Hafiz Albouri, attended the relaunch of the campaign.

But speaking to Doha News, Al Sulaiti said that while he did attend the start of the event “for a couple of minutes,” Katara was only providing a venue, and is not an official supporter or sponsor of the campaign.

Previously, there was talk of involving the Qatar Tourism Authority in the campaign, but the QTA has also said it is not an official supporter of the movement.

Dress code

Expats make up more than 85 percent of Qatar’s population, and the dress code debate has long been an ongoing source of tension here.

Just a few weeks ago, an altercation between a local woman and an expat family over dress was uploaded to YouTube, garnering 63,000 views and spurring Twitter discussion over what the appropriate way would have been to discuss the issue.

Passions are likely to heighten as the temperatures soar and as Ramadan begins in mid-June this year.

Still, Umm Abdullah said that she is hopeful the campaign will mend divisions between groups in Qatar:

“People come here from different countries and cultures and many of them do not know what they should be wearing here in Qatar.

A clash of cultures affects all sides and we don’t want this. We want to reach a middle line – we don’t want two groups with one covered top-to-toe and another not covering at all. We know many of the people who come here are not Muslims, and we are not asking them to cover up but just dress respectfully,” she added.

Thoughts?

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R.D.H
R.D.H
6 years ago

Well it seems less passive-agressive than last years – which is good

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

How about concentrating on smoking in malls, (You caricogenic smoke affects the health of others) or your driving matters (as you can kill and maim other people on the roads.).

I’ve never known how someone dresses to affect the health of any other person.

However I respect their right to peaceful protest as long as they don’t try to intimidate or coerce others into following their opinions.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I’m going to the protest in my speedo

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

In fact this campaign wants me to dress badly just to protest.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

lol exactly. maybe just an athletic supported aka jock stap instead.

Scarletti
Scarletti
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

get out those Budgie Smugglers for your next trip to Ezdan !

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Actually a protest about the open prostitutin in Qatar might be useful. Surely on the moral scale that is worse than a short skirt

Grantley
Grantley
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Yes, that is a fair point. The Radisson Blu car park is full of them of an evening.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Problem being you bust the johns and gonna be a lot of thobes in the clink

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Probably some of these people pushing the modesty campaign as well…..

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

True that. Those most pious are usually the worst offenders.

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Continue with the harrassment. This issue affects the Qatari public as people wear this in malls because stripper clothes are the norm im modern day europe.

You dont like it simply leave go to the UAE.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Deleting for being off topic. It seems like you bring this up on every thread!

Bingo
Bingo
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

How can I see what GUEST said….I always miss his comments…

kdineshl
kdineshl
6 years ago
Reply to  Bingo

lol. I think once someones thread is deleted, the alias turns in to ‘guest’. Is that right Shabina?

kdineshl
kdineshl
6 years ago
Reply to  kdineshl

guess Im wrong!

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

I bring it up because something that is illegal in Qatar and it conducted in full view is never raised, yet silly items like what people wear becomes a major issues!

I guess too many important people are making too much money of this trade.

Still waiting on the Doha News item on this….. and don’t tell me there is no evidence…

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Hahaha, Shabina deleted your comment :p

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

She loves me really. When I finally get to meet her I’ll buy her a drink

Simon
Simon
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

And then go to Star of India? Class, eh??!!

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

These are the perfect types of things to bring up on our private member’s forum, or at our meet-ups for members… (deleting rest of the thread for irrelevance)

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

Hi Shabina; I don’t think you hear this enough, so let me just say to you and the rest of the Doha News team, good job.

Now, if you don’t mind, may I make few suggestions to help you generate money so that the business keep on running:

1) How about allowing people to view deleted comments for a fee? You could even set different fees depending on how bad the comment was.

2) It’s clear that any story involving dress code campaigns and alcohol access regulations will ignite the passion of the people here. So, why not have people a fee for every additional comment, after the 1st one they make here? The fee could be higher if the comment is a reply to another comment. This will either bring in some cash flow, or at least reduce your needing to constantly moderate the comments section as there will less of them.

Just a thought 😉

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

LOL

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Lol, thank you for the kind words and suggestions. 🙂

ppmc
ppmc
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Absolutely right.
More important things could be made…

Mohammed ALTamimi
Mohammed ALTamimi
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

What is modest to one can be immodest to another.

I sometimes wonder if the idea behind this campaign is to justify forcing women to cover up?

How about everyone chooses their own clothes like an adult and stop caring about what others choose to wear?

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

It is about power. That is why it is getting a lot of push-back(online only I guess).

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

They will claim it will be for both sexes but it is aimed at women, an insidious way to turn society against them and make them obey the wishes of men. It’s a form of control.
I agree why can’t people be left to lead their own lives without such moralising as if they are some sort of higher power. Is that too much to ask in this world. If they believe other people are going against God’s wishes then that is their problem, not yours so let God decide.

Bingo
Bingo
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Totally Agree….

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago

As long as any slogan less confusing than that previous motto, which I frankly didn’t understand.

anon
anon
6 years ago

Actually, hot weather is no reason to wear tight clothes that show a lot of skin anyway. The experts’ advice is that it’s more comfortable to wear lightweight, loose clothing that covers the skin.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
6 years ago
Reply to  anon

Bring back the pith helmet! And the safari suit is due for a makeover too.

Gracie
Gracie
6 years ago

It’s funny those mini pics of what is not allowed, so many x’s.
Feeling devastated I missed out on the free shawl and chocolates. It’s easy to abide by the dress code inside malls with the air con causing frost bite, sometimes I just want to curl up in a corner of ice and tell my friends to leave me, run outside and save themselves.

Doc
Doc
6 years ago

I wish they would do this in some of the low end supermarkets back in the UK. Some of the clothes worn in them put me off my microwave chicken korma.

Bornrich
Bornrich
6 years ago
Reply to  Doc

I wish the old dears would cover up too! Varicose veins are enough to put anyone off their Tesco tagliatelle microwave meal.

AEC
AEC
6 years ago
Reply to  Doc

I’m not sure a dressing gown counts as “clothes”

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago
Reply to  Doc

To quote Karl Lagerfeld…

‘Sweatpants are a sign of defeat. You lost control of your life so you bought some sweatpants.’

Waveydavey
Waveydavey
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

What else am I supposed to wear when cleaning my house? That’s mean Karl! I love my sweatpants!!!

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Waveydavey

In your house? You can do the cleaning naked without wearing ‘revealing’ clothes.

Waveydavey
Waveydavey
6 years ago

Haha, I’m sure my husband would be pleased about that!!

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Waveydavey

Get a cleaner 🙂

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
6 years ago
Reply to  Doc

Check out http://www.peopleofwalmart.com t see the American version 🙂

Grantley
Grantley
6 years ago

I’ve lived here for 7 years and in the past year or two have seen an increase in inappropriate dress in malls and other public places so I understand the need for campaigns such as this. I wonder if it would help to have expats also handing out leaflets and pointing out dress codes? I’m often tempted to do just that…

Osama Alassiry AlMaadeed
Reply to  Grantley

You can join the campaign.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

What I suggest these people do is to lobby the government to only recruit Muslims from Pakistan, Egypt, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Afghanistan, Indonesia and India that fit their criteria of ‘correctly’ dressed expats.

This would also mean the end to hiring westerners and Filipinos as the main offenders in their campaign.

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Lol what a douche bag you get paid for what you do. Now Leave lets see Qatar crumble into a failed state since ur so important

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

I’d guess one of us is doing what could’ve been your work but not in the local vocabulary it seems.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago

Deleting for personal attack and subsequent thread.

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

You mean expats pointing out the inappropriateness of fully covered ladies, even with gloves? A sure sign of the controlling patriarchy at work….men in comfortable breezy thobes, women in heat-absorbing full covering. Centuries of envy and control in the name of ‘modesty’ are hard to let go of……….

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago

I want to join or be part of the campaign.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Get your badge and harass women in shopping malls. It’ll make you feel good I’m sure

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Troll

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

No, that is exactly what you will do. It’s a sexist campaign aimed at intimidating women

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Troll

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

someone learnt a new word today

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Bajn

One more troll

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

A nobody calling the main commenter on the site, MMIH, a troll.
I think Shabina should start blocking stupid commenters.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

Says the troll.

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

A whip perhaps?

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Get the morality police like in Saudi with cane switches beating people who don’t conform.

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Like in saudi, but not like saudi. This is qatar and qatari loves to give respect to visitors.

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

Tough respect?

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

LOL that’s what this whole debate is about. Lack of respect. Who do they, and I suspect you’re part of the “who”, respect?

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago

Do the visitors know that?

irobot
irobot
6 years ago

it’s a never ending debate of why the locals impose such restrictions and how its everyone’s
right to wear what makes them comfortable and how Qatar will host WC with such conditions
and how Qataris travel abroad and where skimpy clothes and then some radical
says if you can’t stay you can go back to your country and blah blah blah .. well
this my personal opinion

1. Modest attire is the law of the land.. I’m sure everyone is
familiar with dress code policies at institutions, at work and even at many
high end venues where you’re required to adhere to a certain dress code and I don’t
see anyone rioting over that.

2. In the coming months where the temperature peaks anyone in
their right mind would advise to cover up than go bare because it’s clearly not
the sunbathing weather unless you want to end up with some skin ailment

3. I’m sure no one here likes when things change in their own
country due to influx of other ethnicities so let’s all just calm down and fulfil
our objectives of coming to work here than try to bash the locals at every opportunity
you get.

Expat77
Expat77
6 years ago
Reply to  irobot

Agree to your view points ..we should respect local culture and Dress codes. But still don’t understand the culture of ban on changing jobs without NOC.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
6 years ago
Reply to  irobot

One correction, and it’s an important one; it’s not all or even most locals who are behind this, nor is the support coming from locals only! There many expats, most noticeably Muslim ones, who are even more adamant about the need for modest dressing while in public spaces here.

However, I agree with your 3 points, especially the one about the harsh sun; I don’t understand people who say they want to wear less, exposing arms, legs, and more, because it’s too hot. Unless you plan to drench your self in heavy sun screen, you really need light fabric covering most of your body to protect you from the sun.

Mr. B
6 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

That last point you make is true if you’re spending sustained periods of time in the sun. But life in Doha is often a rush from one AC-controlled environment to another (car to house, office to car, etc.) It can help quite a great deal to be able to wear shorts during these short runs and not feel like you must wear jeans or other long pants. Thinner, lighter shirts, as well, also can help.

Silver John Santos
Silver John Santos
6 years ago

I am a Filipino, 20yrs old. And whenever We are going out with my family I used to wear the thobe because I am enjoying wearing it, and also, I respect the culture of Qataris, and truly, whenever I am wearing it I feel that I am one of them (Qataris) and it’s much enjoyable to wear at this season of summer with extreme heat or temperature 🙂
And many Qataris also want to have a picture with me 🙂 IloveQatar!

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

I like the thobe as well. I used to wear it when I first came here and I was thinking this is the best thing one can wear, very comfortable, always white and clean ,etc. And then I started hearing comments like “are you trying to get the Qatari citizenship” and “hey where is your Ghutra you look like our Indian driver” then I decided to go back to my trousers and shirts and keep my thobes for mosque visits.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

As long as you have no work to do it’s a great outfit. Otherwise….

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

I see what u did there… Yes funny indeed

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

very comfortable white dish-dashe made in white cotton! Why abayas are black and made in synthetic textile, ideal for this heat?

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

You must love attention 🙂

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago

are you sure they consider you are one of them?

edna
edna
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

Haha

Heisenberg
Heisenberg
6 years ago

Give this man a cookie

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

Maybe I hang around with the wrong class of Qatari, but when they see a non-GCC Arab wearing the thobe what they say to me isn’t what they are saying to you. And if they want a picture with you, it’s not for the reason you are probably thinking.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago

Have you bought a Land Cruiser?

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

Theoretically this is a good thing but in practice you need a lot of tact to go to someone in the street and tell them to dress modestly or that they are breaching local laws with their dress or that their skirt is a tad too short. Even if you use the nicest words the situation would always look weird. And you can see from the video on Youtube how it went wrong.

jliscorpio
jliscorpio
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I think the Qatari was absolutely horrible for accosting the family while they were with their small child. The families response was horrible as well. The whole affair was an out and out failure.

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I suggest not ‘telling’ them anything as it is not your place – you control only your behaviour and no one else’s. A suggestion might work better.

Steve Maccany
Steve Maccany
6 years ago

This should be supported by all expats as well as the citizens. Along with wearing less, the improper way of dressing with abaya and exposing the tight inner wears of those many who wear them should also be a concern here.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

The issue here is not the respect of Qatar’s culture but the lack of respect for all cultures but this doesn’t come from the government or any major company here, in fact they are distancing themselves from the whole exercise and righty so. This is a few individuals trying to impose their beliefs and standards on others they don’t agree with. These people who were invited to come here have broken no law, committed no crimes so please protest if you wish and we will exercise our right to ignore you

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

“individuals trying to impose their beliefs and standards on others they don’t agree with. ”

A veiw held by the vast majority of Qatar and standards set by Qatari law. You agreed to this when u decided to come here.

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

Law? Which bit of the law are you quoting? Show me the bit of the law that specifically says women should wear a skirt that goes beneath the knee.
Indeed show me one government department or agency who are openly supporting the enforcement of a dress code in malls.
As far as I am led to believe these standards are not set by Qatari law. But feel free to correct me and paste the specific law about dress codes below.

Doc
Doc
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

The article also ‘covers’ this (you like what I did there)!?

‘Though Qatar is a conservative Islamic country, the law does not define modest dress.

Article 57 of the Qatari constitution states that “abiding by public order and morality, observing national traditions and established customs is a duty of all who reside in the State of Qatar or enter its territory.”

However, the group behind the modesty campaign has said that women and men should cover at least their shoulders and knees, and not wear tight, revealing or provocative clothing’

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago
Reply to  Doc

Bingo. As much as certain people might like to think that the law specifically covers (ba-dum) the issue of ‘modest dress’, it doesn’t.

I’m all for the government of a land to tell the residents what they can and cannot do. I start to get wary when a group of people who believe they are acting in the interests of the majority start interpreting and enforcing their own laws.

If modest dress is an issue that is such importance to the local community let them write a law about it. The fact that this hasn’t happened speaks volumes to me.

Well said
Well said
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

Hear hear

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

Article 57 of the Qatari constitution states that “abiding by public order and morality, observing national traditions and established customs is a duty of all who reside in the State of Qatar or enter its territory.”

Might be a bendy law but you get what it means when the vast majority of Qataris and khaleejis say that short shorts are disrespectful. You should be grateful we dont have moral police although i can think of alot of mothers and fathers that support this

AEC
AEC
6 years ago

How short is a short short?

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  AEC

Over the knees

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

If a short skirt, above the knees, is so clear and obviously against the moral character of the country then it will be the simplest thing for a law to be passed about it.

So why hasn’t this happened? Give me one good reason?

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

And I have Qatari friends who are terrified that their country will end up like Saudi, and others who are terrified that it will end up like UAE.

But at the end of the day that’s not my problem with this. I wouldn’t like to think that we will soon start to see self appointed “traffic police” who stop drivers and tell them that their driving or their parking is in breach of the ‘established customs’ of the country. No one in their right mind will think that an everyday person has the right to order a driver off the road.

If malls want their own dress code – I’m totally down with that.
If the police want to police this – I’m totally down with that.

But the possibility of a slippery slope towards vigilantism is worrying.

Will there be people objecting to women wearing bikinis next to the pool at hotels? How is that acceptable, according to the law?

Will there be people objecting to women wearing bikinis next to the pool at their residential tower or compound? How would that be acceptable, according to the law?

AEC
AEC
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

Next they’ll be in your bedroom.

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago
Reply to  AEC

Let’s follow that bit of reasoning – could you have any objection to a grassroots campaign to stamp out unmarried men and women from sharing apartments, because some may view it as illegal and unconstitutional?

What starts as a campaign in a mall, and then moves to Aspire Park, and then moves to the Corniche, and then moves to public parks, and then moves on to compounds and into towers… where does it all end?

Big Sumo
Big Sumo
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

I dont see the Qatari men who regularly visit Mykonos at the Intercon for lunch objecting to the bikinis. In fact many request the specific tables with a terrific view of the pool. But maybe it’s the person wearing the bikini that is the bad person not the man staring and rubbing his thigh.

AEC
AEC
6 years ago

So you say this but how do we know that “the vast majority of Qataris and khaleejis say that short shorts are disrespectful”? I’ve never seen a mechanism whereby public opinion is translated into legislation – let alone a survey – on such matters. It wouldn’t surprise me though.

عبدالله الهتمي
عبدالله الهتمي
6 years ago
Reply to  AEC

Ever heard of the petito principi fallacy ur doing that.

Because khaleejis are muslim and thus accepted sharia law so ofcourse if they accept sharia law they accept there rules now can you stop woth childesh counter arguments?

AEC
AEC
6 years ago

1. childish does not have an “e” in it 2. petito principi arguments are circular arguments – not counter arguments. 3. What is the penalty then for short shorts under sharia law – or at least the sharia law that all the muslim Khaleejis “accept”?

Chilidog
Chilidog
6 years ago

So you’re saying that gulf Arabs are Muslim as if it is a definition. Are you saying there’s no choice or thought involved? You just accept it because you have to because of where you’re born? That actually in a nutshell explains a lot about Qatar and the surrounding counties. But that’s also even scarier to me than the hard-nosed stance on how evil bare knees are.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

Over the last 1400 years there has been a religious cleansing in the arabian peninisular, with Jews and Christains in particular either being killed or driven out. (Some converted out of practicality) . We now see a resurgence in this type of cleansing with religious minorities coming under attack in Iraq and Syria. There is no compulsion in religion as long as you are the right religion to start with…..

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

That is exactly what I wrote and that is exactly correct.
The law is vague at best and does not address a specific dress code. It talks about morality and established customs but by defintion these change all the time as cultures change, so who defines right from wrong? Not me and not you, in fact not anyone and certainly not anyone from a religious standpoint.

The fact that the government and no ministry supports this tells you all you need to know.

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Deleting for repeat post.

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago

Pleasure derived from coercion. There must be a word for that.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  Bajn

…sadism?

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

No, something a little less harsher ?

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  Bajn

sweet sadism?

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago

Have you seen some of the clothes in the windows of the high-end shops? Why sell them or even have available? I see clothes I wouldn’t want my wife to wear and I’m from the heathen western world. Now please don’t tell me the Qataris who buy them are only wearing them at home to “please their husbands”. Villagio’s snob end should only have thobe and abaya shops.

Heisenberg
Heisenberg
6 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Parties, gatherings and weddings.

Illusionist's wife
Illusionist's wife
6 years ago
Reply to  Heisenberg

And when they travel abroad … ever seen what happens in the plane shortly before landing? Abayas and head scarves are being thrown away, and out come clothes that are sometimes more revealing compared to what “Western ladies” are wearing …

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago

Deleting the rest of this thread for being racist and crass.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

I knew that Shabina would introduce her own “You Matter on Doha News” campaign and promptly delete a whole bunch of posts 🙂

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

Her hypocrisy does seem to be increasing of late, doesn’t it?

Illusionist's wife
Illusionist's wife
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

Sorry Shabina, but I am not a racist on this matter but just simply telling how things are … and there is nothing crass about stating the truth …

ThighSmile
ThighSmile
6 years ago

They’ll never take away my short shorts

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  ThighSmile

Revolution I say!

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  ThighSmile

It could stink

Bornrich
Bornrich
6 years ago

Wearing brown sandals in town. An absolute no no. White or black always!!!!!!!!!

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago

I always have my shoulder covered in public places, however I wonder if this “Reflect your respect” could be extended to all those maids who have no rights here. This woman could do a lot for them thanks to her attire.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

I think it’s wrong some people dress their maids in pajamas when they go out. That is so disrespectful

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

It is actually!!!
I find it those pajamas don’t dignify them at all!!! Trash clothes to wear just because they come from poor countries.

Big Sumo
Big Sumo
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I so agree, they look ridiculous in those outfits, I feel so sorry a. They are a maid b. They have to wear that shlop c. They become nameless “I’ll be coming on the boat cruise with the 2 kids and the maid”. What she doesn’t even have the respect of a name??

Inequality
Inequality
6 years ago

Maybe some effort could be expelled to help persons deal with why they have such a problem of how another human being is dressed and whether it is sufficiently modest (in their subjective opinion). Surely their are greater causes to get behind in a modern society… like the terrible inequality, meaning that people feel they can tell you what to do because they are of a higher class in this warped society

It’s bad enough that some people are being treated like slaves and a large number with a terrible lack of respect – we now want to take away their freedom to express themselves by the attire they choose. Wouldn’t it be easier to just issue an expat uniform on arrival so that we can be easily identified, abused, disrespected, looked down upon and ignored.

Yeah yeah yeah… if i don’t like why don’t i leave???? Well i get good money so i stay. However, i still don’t like it and choose my ability to speak to express so and moan.
Thanks for reading though, i sure feel better after getting that off my chest. Feel free to use your ability to communicate and comment and moan and feel better too. I’ll be sure to not read them.

AEC
AEC
6 years ago

Yet again I am somewhat baffled by this campaign. Does “You matter in Qatar” mean I don’t matter when I am somewhere else? What is it trying to say? Do they actually mean “What you are wearing matters in Qatar”?

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  AEC

Absolutely, once you get on the plane it is OK to put your “stripper clothes” on 🙂

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

Ever seen what the men change in to on a flight bound for Casablanca?

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

No idea. Does it Reflect Your Respect?

Amy
Amy
6 years ago

Wow some of these comments are really disrespectful. I think it’s a great campaign. I like to think what I wear is appropriate but I’m never 100% sure. This can just make it a little clearer for us all. And like they’ve pointed out it’s not just about dress, it’s also about behaviour!!!

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Amy

So disagreeing is disrespectful. *sigh*. What has this world come to.

Chilidog
Chilidog
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Don’t worry MIMH, all commenters will get a “Certificate of Participation” from Shabina just for showing up and making a good effort. So smile! 🙂

Masboro
Masboro
6 years ago
Reply to  Amy

That’s the problem – who decides what is ‘appropriate’ and the fact that you are never 100% sure means that you could be approached by someone forcing their views on to you at any time. My wife feels very intimated by this whole campaign every year it comes around and, like you, she thinks she is dressing appropriately but is terrified of being approached by a complete stranger. That just can’t be right.

The Avenger
The Avenger
6 years ago
Reply to  Amy

You’re such an advocate of free speech !

Posthaze
Posthaze
6 years ago

With my respect, But can someone please tell me which part of wearing men’s casual shorts offended people?

AEC
AEC
6 years ago
Reply to  Posthaze

knees

AEC
AEC
6 years ago
Reply to  AEC

especially the knobbly ones

Posthaze
Posthaze
6 years ago