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Sunday, March 7, 2021

More public schools in Qatar to open up places for expat children

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Qatar’s education authority has agreed to increase the number of government-funded independent schools that admit children of expat parents working in the private sector, according to local media reports.

The move comes as Qatar struggles to cope with a shortage of places in the private sector.

By the time the new academic year begins in September, some 28 state schools will have been allowed to admit non-Qatari children, the Supreme Education Council (SEC) said.

However, these schools are only located in remote areas outside of Doha, where there are no private school options.

The districts include Al Shamal, Dukhan, Rawdat Al Rashid, Al Karana, Al Shahania, Al Ghuwairia, Al Kharsaa, Al Kaaban, Al Ghashamia, Al Jameelia, Semaisma and Al Dakheera, The Peninsula reports.

The SEC first began opening up independent schools to non-Qatari children whose parents don’t work for the government in May 2012. Previous to that, the schools only accepted children whose parents were employed by the nation’s public sector.

Earlier this week, the SEC distributed a list of all schools that would be part of the wider network, according to the Peninsula.

Admission rules

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

To qualify, children have to live in the area in which the school is situated, and their admission is subject to availability of places.

Once enrolled in an independent school, a student cannot then transfer to another independent school that has a private school nearby, a recently circular stated.

Ordinarily, only Qatari children, children of Qatari fathers and/or mothers and the offspring of GCC citizens are eligible to attend an independent kindergarten or school, according to the latest admission rules issued by the SEC this week.

Registration for admission to independent schools for the 2015/16 academic year opens on May 10 and runs until June 2.

Limited places

With an expanding population, particularly among the expat sector, there has been increasing pressure on schools places in Qatar.

Authorities have recently been trying to address this by stepping up construction of buildings to house independent and private schools.

For illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Earlier this year, Qatar’s public works authority Ashghal said construction of 33 new schools and kindergartens was nearly complete and they were preparing to ready them to hand over to education institutions before September.

Many of these are situated in areas outside of central Doha.

Meanwhile, last month the SEC said it would be relaxing some restrictions it had previously imposed on private schools, to make it easier for children to join schools mid-way through the academic year and to move between school years.

It was hoped that the new requirements would make it easier for expats moving to Qatar in the middle of the school year to find places for their children.

Thoughts?

8 COMMENTS

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q1
q1
5 years ago

why where expats not allowed to enroll in public schools in the first place?

terracotta
terracotta
5 years ago
Reply to  q1

they were allowed, if the parents were working in the government sector

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
5 years ago
Reply to  terracotta

Article 49 (Constitution of the State of Qatar)

All citizens have the right to education; and the State shall endeavor to make general education compulsory and free of charge in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations of the State.

Obviously this applies to “Citizens”. That means, to 15 – 20% of the population.

Talal Mousa
Talal Mousa
5 years ago
Reply to  q1

ask your people and yourself

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago

Probably not useful for 90% of the population as I assume these schools teach in Arabic with a heavy influence towards Islamic studies. Possibly some Arab expats in low paying jobs might use them

Yacine
Yacine
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

True. I see a lot of Egyptian and Sudanese families sending their kids there, since education there is free. Usually, they send them home to study, but now they might prefer to keep them here in Qatar.

LUIS
LUIS
5 years ago

But by Public Schools you mean Arabic schools right? I work for the Govt. Sector but i don’t want to send my kids to the Public Schools in that case. Are there any English (Public Schools)?

mmbb
mmbb
5 years ago

No these schools teach both arabic n English..as arabic is their national language n the country is Islamic… other all subjects are in English

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