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Sunday, May 9, 2021

New penalties such as jail time included in revamped Qatar food law

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Pakora

Under Qatar’s new stricter food law, eateries that flout safety rules not only face fines and closures, but also potential imprisonment if they are found guilty of serving rotten or expired goods.

Law No. 4 of 2014 was approved in February, but more details about its provisions became available in a Ministry of Municipality and Urban Planning circular that was issued this week.

According to that bulletin, the penalties are:

  • Six months jail time, and/or fines of up to QR15,000 for anyone found dealing in expired food;
  • Six months to one year, and/or fines of up to QR15,000 for selling food unsuitable for human consumption;
  • One to two years in jail and/or fines of up to QR30,000 for selling food that is harmful for human consumption;
  • Two to four years in jail and/or fines of up to QR30,000 for selling rotten or unsuitable food that causes permanent disability to a person; and
  • Four to eight years in jail and/or a fine of up to QR60,000 for selling rotten or unsuitable food that causes the death of a person.

Laboratory testing could be conducted to classify the food as either rotten, damaged or unsuitable for human consumption, the MMUP added.

Other punishments previously explained when the law passed in February include an initial 60-day closure for violations – twice the previous limit of 30 days for a first offense; a reduction in the length of time to appeal, down from 15 days to 10; and the naming and shaming of the outlet on a government website.

More information about the law and its provisions can be read below:

Thoughts?

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Jasmine
Jasmine
7 years ago

Very good. I hope they strictly implement this law. I also hope other laws such as the Traffic Law and Labour Law are looked upon and are strictly implemented and not just writing it for the sake of writing. Writing the law and putting it down on paper is easy…the question is implementing these laws in Qatar which is rarely seen.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
7 years ago
Reply to  Jasmine

Let’s hope the enforcement of the traffic laws and labor laws aren’t an indicator of who this proposed law will also be enforced.

Mohammed Albanai
Mohammed Albanai
7 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Congratulations Mr. Fryer you win this years award for most times mentioning traffic/ labour problems in articles that having nothing to do with traffic and or labour.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago

I though I would have won that..never mind Ill try harder. But its true what Mr Fryer says…;)

Mohammed Albanai
Mohammed Albanai
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

what can i say, a win by wasta is still a win

Guest
Guest
7 years ago

The Picture which given above mostly you can find that in ASIAN hotel’s (India, Bangladesh, Sri lanka, Pakistan, Nepal Etc.,) and i think here in Doha-Qatar, No one have dare to sale rotten & unsuitable & harmful food

we have to aware before buying anything …………………

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest

Just like the “we all can see you” campaign… It seems like the targeted “offenders” are a predefined group of people…

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

But in fairness Osama, the people in this country who prepare 99% of commercial food for sale, are all from a predefined group of people!

SokhnaFan2010
SokhnaFan2010
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest

Really? You can find this story in any city in the world, on ANY continent. Don’t be naive to think that it only happens in Asian countries ( which in itself is derogatory.)

Guest
Guest
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest

To be fair I’ve never gotten food poisoning from eating South Asian foods as seen in the photo here in Qatar, not even when I got them from the dodgiest of places in Central Doha. However the times I did get food poisoning was when I ate from street vendors on trips to parts of South Asia (I’m not a very smart man). I’ve never really thought twice about health hazards when buying these food items because I’ve always assumed they take their job semi-seriously here, especially on foreign soil.

That said, I’d like some pakoras right about now. Hnnnnnngg…

Tarun
Tarun
7 years ago

I appreciate this step by government in betterment of society.

InternetQatar.com
7 years ago

Appreciations to the Govt authorities.

However, yet it is unclear that where and how to file a complaint against eateries or quality of food served in a restaurant.

KK
KK
7 years ago

OK, but shouldn’t Labour Law and Traffic Law be a higher priority ?

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  KK

Have a think about it..who does this law effect in the adverse prism then who does it benefit? The think who does the Labour laws and Traffic Laws effect in the same way..The answer should be clear.

Mohammed Albanai
Mohammed Albanai
7 years ago

4 years for selling food that causes permanent disability? sounds a bit disproportionate

Martin
Martin
7 years ago

These announcements are pointless if not enforced so why make them.
We are still waiting for those found guilty of the deaths of our children in Villaggio to go to jail or even pay their fines or in the case of the owner of Gympanzee simply to attend court for his own appeal.
So many promises were made about swift justice and support for the families from the Qatari Authorities – 2 years on neither has happened.

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