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Saturday, September 18, 2021

New site shows the human side of the people of Qatar

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All photos courtesy of Humans of the Middle East/Facebook

Inspired by the global success of the website and Facebook page Humans of New York, three Qatar residents have started up their own version of the venture, offering glimpses into the different lives of people living in the Gulf country.

Humans of the Middle East profile
Humans of the Middle East profile

Egyptian Khalid Zidan, 31, his New Zealand wife Elizabeth and Palestinian colleague Abdullah Al Talla spend around 20 hours of their own time during evenings and weekends approaching strangers in malls, in parks and on the streets.

They take their photographs and ask personal and philosophical questions for short profiles that are then posted daily on their Humans of the Middle East Facebook and Instagram pages.

To encourage people to share different aspects of their lives here in Qatar and back home, they asked various probing questions:

  • What’s the biggest obstacle in your life?
  • Who is the most loved person you have lost?
  • If you had the chance to live your life again, what would you do differently?

And while a few people have declined to engage, most have been keen to talk and share, Zidan said. Speaking to Doha News, he added:

“People generally like talking about themselves. The most common answer we get is that they miss their families. They miss kids’ birthdays and anniversaries with their wife. Even though work here is good and the salary is good, it doesn’t stop them feeling a loss of their loved ones.”

Inspiration

A procurement officer for Qatar’s new port project, Zidan is not a professional journalist or photographer and said he has never done anything like this before.

Khalid Zidan, Humans of Middle East
Khalid Zidan, Humans of Middle East

But when he discovered the Humans of New York (HONY) blog last year, he felt inspired to do something similar in Qatar, and eventually across the region.

Established by photographer Brandon Stanton five years ago to chronicle snapshots of the diversity of the vibrant city’s population, the quirky and honest tone of HONY has helped it gain more than 8 million followers world-wide.

Zidan said Stanton’s work with homeless people in the city particularly struck a chord, and inspired him to employ a similar method to highlight the personalities and stories of a cross section of Qatar’s population, from the very wealthy to the blue-collar laborers.

“I thought, if he’s doing that in New York, imagine what we could do in Qatar where there are so many people from all over the world. That would be great,” Zidan told Doha News.

Additionally, by offering glimpses into people’s lives, Zidan said he felt HOME could go some way in dispelling stereotypes about the region and those living in it.

“When my wife goes back home, she tries to explain that the Gulf isn’t bad, where we live isn’t dangerous. We want to show people ‘this is the Middle East’. It’s not just all the bad things you read about in the media. We are all ordinary people, living and working,” he said.

Finding interviewees

Since the HOME page began in June this year, its popularity has been spreading, gaining around 2,000 new likes a week for a total of more than 16,000 followers.

Humans of the Middle East profile
Humans of the Middle East profile

The three contributors go out sometimes individually, sometimes together, and seek potential interviewees.

Zidan explained:

“Everyone has interesting stories but they think they have a normal life – they don’t know they have something special. You get to learn something important – even the person smiling and looking happy, he has his own story he thinks of every day but doesn’t share.

I just walk up to them, say that I am from HOME. Some people know our page, most don’t yet. I explain we are trying to improve society. Some people share very personal stories and so don’t want to show their face. That’s fine, we can photograph their hands. And we don’t use names – we don’t even ask their names,” Zidan explained, talking about his approach to strangers.

So far, the team has interviewed around 60 people. During the summer months, they are mostly limited to malls, which Zidan admits he has been criticized about. But when the weather cools, the team hopes to spend more time on the streets and parks interviewing subjects.

One of the most memorable people Zidan has interviewed is due to feature on the site next week, he said.

 For illustrative purposes only
For illustrative purposes only

“I saw him on the Corniche, just sitting alone, smoking a cigarette. He had a look in his eye that said he had an interesting story but had never told it to anyone.”

The Egyptian man told Zidan he had three sisters and a brother. His parents divorced when he was eight, and they both left the family.

Though he was the youngest, he quickly assumed the role of man of the family and began looking for work. He took on all sorts of legal, and sometimes illegal, jobs to pay for his siblings’ educations.

“He had no childhood,” Zidan said.

After their schooling was complete, the man told his sisters he had an offer to work in Dubai. In truth, he had no job and was traveling in the hope of finding a job, but feared if his sisters knew that, they would stop him from going.

He successfully found a job, worked there for three years, then was offered a position in an international company in Qatar and is now living here. His sisters are now married and since their brother had become successful enough, he was able to help them with their weddings, Zidan recounted.

Fundraising

As well as providing an insight into people’s lives, Zidan said he hopes also to use the page as a platform for philanthropic work, alongside a charity, to raise funds and help some of Qatar’s lower-income workers.

Humans of the Middle East profile
Humans of the Middle East profile

“Imagine if we could really help the laborers here, every year do something to help them. We could use the page to raise awareness about who they are and their situations,” he said.

“When you see something bad in the society you live in, I believe you have some responsibility. Being part of society means contributing to it. There’s no perfect city, but you want the city you live in to be better,” he said.

While the group is starting in Qatar, the team hopes to eventually expand the reach of the page throughout the region.

“Some people say we’re not as good as HONY, and we’re not. But we’ve just started and we’re learning and improving. Generally the feedback we get is positive, and it makes me happy that we are making other people happy,” Zidan said.

Have you seen the page? Thoughts?

14 COMMENTS

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Bling
Bling
6 years ago

lol but official page is coming to Middle East soon.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago

“Imagine if we could really help the laborers here, every year do something to help them. We could use the page to raise awareness about who they are and their situations………………When you see something bad in the society you live in, I believe you have some responsibility”. Agreed, but obviously the plight of the laborers isn’t currently bad enough to warrant any change of law that might improve it.

Maddix
Maddix
6 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

Yes. The media keeps criticizing Qatar in an unproductive and fallacious manner. The “Deaths” of migrant workers for example was completely misrepresented. The workers are not dying at abnormal rates, even the Indian embassy had to comment on that to vindicate Qatar. The main issue at hand is the exploitation of migrant workers by companies. Qatar has to start penalizing and examining these companies more often. There are also other issues, but they aren’t nearly as serious.

Asinine Thinker
Asinine Thinker
6 years ago
Reply to  Maddix

Hello, I don’t know your name sir, so I will just call you Mr. Sycophant. Errr, that name is too hard, so maybe I will call you Mr. Boot-licker. But this name is not fun, so lets just call you Mr. a**kisser :). Now thats a cool name. You can go brag about it to your friends, some guy has befriended you on DN and has given you a cute nickname. Coolness point over 9000.

When Apple contracts out Foxconn to manufacture their products, and Foxconn employees (I mean, Foxconn workers, no no, Foxconn laborers, no that’s not right either, what do you call these blue collar people, err slaves in Doha? Yes, those Foxconn “Bachelors” LOL) commit suicides, everyone keeps talking about how irresponsible and greedy Apple is. Well, to be fair with you, most Qataris do not comment on such issues, as they also benefit from such methods, and these guys do love their slavery system, but a few handful of them comment on such issues, and its always Apple’s fault, no no, its America’s fault.

Hypocrisy at its finest. From the law-“BOOKS” of Qatar, (Qatari lawbooks, LOL), what I can gather, at least 51% of any company has to be owned by a local. That by the very definition (even in Qatari interpretation) make those companies “QATARI”. So Mr. A**kisser, if I understood you right, are you trying to say some Qatari Companies are at fault here? Ahhhhh, how can you say that, you peasant, you miskin? How can the ever righteous, glorious, and the gem of history Qatari master race (since 1971) be at fault? How can you? How dare you? Don’t you know they can cancel your visa anytime? Don’t you know? DON’T YOU?

Maddix
Maddix
6 years ago

Stop putting words in my mouth. I never said that Qatar isn’t at fault. I specifically pointed out that QATAR has to change its laws because COMPANIES aren’t being penalized enough for the abuse. I want the media to cover this more often, but it simply is counterproductive if they start making up blatant lies about migrant workers dying. Qatar would therefore lose the incentive to change if the media is bound to lie about it anyway.

hvk16
hvk16
6 years ago

Goodness, tone it down, will you?!

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Maddix

Lol, as if the Indian embassy cares about Indians dying in Qatar.

Maddix
Maddix
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I actually calculated the death rate of migrant workers. It IS normal. I keep hearing the same 4,000 number repeated over and over again “4,000 migrant workers are going to die by the time the first ball is kicked in 2022”, BUT they fail to look at the death RATE. The number of deaths says nothing about how dangerous the conditions are. I’m not trying to justify the conditions in which these laborers are living in. Their living conditions are HORRIBLE, their salaries are often delayed, and there are many more problems, but we have to be honest in our criticism. I made a video on this a while back. Watch it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jlrW9pVFH0

Worker abuse isn’t only an issue in Qatar. Even many US companies abuse workers, but the only difference is that they do it inconspicuously and indirectly. Apple and Nike, for example, depend on workers from China and Indonesia. Instead of flying them to the US, they work in their own countries. Their conditions are ABHORRENT and are paid close to nothing. Watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5uYCWVfuPQ

I am obviously against this abuse, and I would certainly be in favor of adapting better policies to help improve the conditions of workers in Qatar, but I simply can’t stand the hypocrisy presented in the media.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Maddix

I’m interested. How did you calculate that?

Maddix
Maddix
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Watch my video

Maddix
Maddix
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I don’t like the tone I used in the video. I was too soft on Qatar. I should have been harsher. I didn’t emphasize the human rights abuses happening in Qatar. Nevertheless, it doesn’t look like I made any mistakes in my estimates. You can check the video description for the sources.

Vishal
Vishal
6 years ago

Looking at things as they currently are, the inhumane side of Qatar would be a greater hit.

Qatar
Qatar
6 years ago

“Egyptian Khalid Zidan, 31, his New Zealand wife Elizabeth and Palestinian colleague Abdullah Al Talla”
Thanks Lesley we really needed to know their nationalities (y)

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

This is nonsense, there are no humans in Qatar. Only locals and expats.

As the Muslim refugees poor out of the Middle East and head toward the evil west, we must ask ourselves what the rich, Arab, Muslim States are doing for these refugees? Wouldn’t offering them asylum and citizenship in Arab Muslim States rather than the alien culture of Europe be the Ismail thing to do? (After, Qatar, Saudi and the UAE had a big hand in destabilising, Syria and Libya)

Take your brothers in and treat them like brothers and humans, rather than pushing them towards an alien culture.

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