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Saturday, September 18, 2021

PHOTOS: A day at a Doha slaughterhouse during Eid

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Qatar residents continue to pour into local slaughterhouses for their animals to be butchered in honor of Eid Al Adha, which began on Tuesday, Oct. 15.

Today marks the end of the three-day  Muslim holiday, the “festival of the sacrifice,” which falls during the annual Hajj pilgrimage to Makkah. According to Islamic tradition, the holiday commemorates the prophet Abraham’s willingness to follow God’s order to sacrifice his only son at the time as a testament of faith and obedience.

Ultimately, God spared Abraham’s son, ordering a ram be killed in his place. Muslims are required to distribute some of the meat of the animal to family members and donate some as charity.

Over the past few years, Qatar has been cracking down on slaughters that take place outside of approved abattoirs. But according to the Peninsula, the long lines and huge crowds at Widam (formerly Mawashi’s) five slaughterhouses have prompted some to butcher their sheep in their homes (either outside or in the carpark).

The newspaper reports:

But the Municipal Ministry had warned it was illegal to butcher animals in other places other than the designated abattoirs with butchers licensed by the Municipal Ministry. It stressed it is a must to have animals butchered in abattoirs where it is done by licensed butchers in the presence of veterinarians who check the animal before and after the slaughter for hygiene.

Widam, which said it expects to slaughter some 10,000 sheep during Eid, will keep abattoirs open until 8pm today.

Thoughts?

13 COMMENTS

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Ali
Ali
7 years ago

This Eid was quite boring and uneventful for me.

1. No animals roaming on road
2. No animal fodder being sold on streets
3. No slaughter in homes
4. No animal hide snatching and sometimes at gun point

I didn’t even eat goat’s liver this Eid 🙁

Skander
Skander
7 years ago
Reply to  Ali

1) There shouldn’t be animals roaming on the road.
2) Nothing should be sold “on the streets”.
3) Slaughter in homes is not monitored by veterinarians.
4) ….
5) Buy it from the market/a slaughterhouse.

Ali
Ali
7 years ago
Reply to  Skander

Looks like you completely missed what I was trying to say.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

As you mention it in the story above, what a nasty thing to do to Abraham asking him to commit infanticide. That is not something that is worth celebrating for any god!

Ali
Ali
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You will never understand this.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Ali

And you never had.

DavidRSS8
DavidRSS8
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The celebration is that God spared Abraham’s son. It symbolizes the end of human sacrifice in that religion, which, at the time, ran against the current in most of the region’s religions.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  DavidRSS8

Sounds pretty nasty to me, if I kidnap you and your son and then tell you to kill your son and them at the last minute say ‘only joking!’ Would you consider me a nice person? Of course not, you would consider me a psychopath

HalfManArmy
HalfManArmy
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

first qataris now religion. Little by little..

Anon
Anon
7 years ago

Ah, look at the cute goats eating grass before the psychopathic, sociopathic sky pixie demands their sacrifice, and the ironic herds follow suit……

KK
KK
7 years ago

I visited the area during Eid. The slaughterhouse does not meet even the basic hygienic conditions. No professional facilities whatsoever.

outdoorsboys
outdoorsboys
7 years ago

I would comment that at
least Qatar is attempting to monitor both hygiene and animal welfare; even if
to non-Muslim eyes it feels barbaric to queue up in the heat with a tethered
animal waiting for its ritual slaughter. However, perhaps it is more honest to
accept that you are taking a life for the pleasures of your table rather than
the western preference of buying meat, as sanitised as possible and somehow
ignoring that it was once running around. On the other hand, I find the idea of
‘sacrificing’ a living creature to a deity somewhat perverse and archaic and
wonder why it has not been substituted, in these days of caring for our fellow
creatures, with something wholly symbolic , such as in Christianity, taking
wafers and wine to symbolise the body and blood of Jesus. I am sure that Muslim posters here can explain
the concept to me.

ann
ann
7 years ago

if we can slaughter other animals for food, eg cows chickens ect, why not goats? so long as it is in a humane way of course.

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