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Monday, October 18, 2021

Qatar condemns deadly mosque bombing as Kuwait declares day of mourning

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Expressing its full support for Kuwait, Qatar has denounced as a “criminal act” a suicide bombing that killed 27 people and injured more than 200 others during Friday prayers in the Gulf state’s capital.

The attack took place yesterday at one of the country’s oldest Shia mosques, Al-Imam Al-Sadiq mosque, and was believed to have been carried out by ISIL.

The bombing was the first of its kind in Kuwait, which has declared a state of emergency to manage the crisis, as well as a day of mourning to mark the tragedy.

In a statement, Qatar’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) said:

“This criminal act is contrary to all moral and human values and contradicts all religions and teachings of Islam and its principles of tolerance.”

MOFA also stressed its support for security measures taken by Kuwait to preserve stability, and expressed condolences to the victims and their families.

Several Qatar residents also expressed solidarity with Kuwait and the victims of yesterday’s attack:

According to Reuters, ISIL took credit for the bombing, saying in a statement that it had targeted “a temple of the rejectionists,” a derogatory reference to Shia Muslims.

Kuwait’s Amir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah responded to the attack by saying, according to the state news agency:

“The blast was meant to tear asunder the fabric of the well-knitted Kuwaiti society by fomenting sectarian divisions and conflicts, but that would not happen as Kuwaitis value their unity and societal solidarity.”

Other attacks

Separately, CNN reports that ISIS claimed responsibility for a shooting spree that killed nearly 40 people, many of them tourists, at a beach resort in Tunisia yesterday.

And in France, a man was taken into custody after apparently beheading his boss and then ramming his car into a warehouse at a chemical plant, causing an explosion.

Qatar also condemned those attacks, saying it “rejects violence in all its forms and manifestations, whatever its motives and causes.”

It is unclear if the attacks on three different continents were related.

According to Reuters:

“ISIL had urged its followers on Tuesday to step up attacks during the Ramadan fasting month against Christians, Shi’ites and Sunni Muslims fighting with a US-led coalition against the ultra-hardline jihadist group.”

The Kuwait mosque bombing comes about a month after ISIL claimed responsibility for two attacks on Shia mosques in Saudi Arabia.

The first killed at least 21 people after a suicide bomber detonated explosives hidden under his clothes inside Ali Ibn Abi Taleb mosque in Kudeih in the eastern province of Qatif on May 22, Al Jazeera reported.

A week later, a suicide bomber killed four people in the parking lot of the Imam Hussein mosque in Dammam, which is also in eastern Saudi Arabia.

The proximity of the explosions, both of which occurred less than 200km from Doha, left some Qatar residents uncomfortable.

Despite Qatar’s largely peaceful and stable history in recent years, yesterday’s bombing of another fellow GCC state is likely to add to those fears.

Thoughts?

117 COMMENTS

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Amber
Amber
6 years ago

You would think these heathens focus on their personal relationship with Allah rather than killing innocent people in the month of Ramadan.

ISIL/ISIS is a poison for the Muslim Ummah. They claim to be fighting in the name of Allah but majority of the people they wind up killing are their own muslim brothers and sisters.

May Allah destroy ISIS/ISIL and protect the people from their evil actions.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago

Pathetic…… these ISIS lot

Expat
Expat
6 years ago

In retrospect, ISIS might turn out what the Muslims and the world need. Such cowardly and sick acts will only bring the two sects closer and show the world that ISIS is not Islam and Islam is not a terror cult!

May the martyrs of yesterday rest in peace!

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat

Meanwhile ISIS still continues to attract psychos/misfits/losers from the West.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Bajn

Where is the West?

Rororo
Rororo
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Where is the Middle East?

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Rororo

Look out your window. If there is sand or fighting then you are there.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat

it would be nice to think so, but the evidence speaks otherwise. To the Christian observer, Islam is a fervent, deeply seated idealogical religion as much for Sunni as it is for Shia, and after centuries of conflict the divide seems to be getting wider as opposed to closer. And if the extremist Sunni’s are not fighting Shia then they turn their attentions on the liberal decadent west, also idealogically worlds apart, who now find them themselves increasingly fearful of the Muslims in their midst, either nationals or immigrants.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Does Qatar have any Shia mosques?

Michkey
Michkey
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Yes. But it also has YOU, if your comment is in introspective of the possibility of a similar attack here!

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

I wasn’t sure and yes I was thinking of similar attacks here. Only takes one person as we saw with the suicide bombing in 2005 in Doha.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago

ISIl may have had absolutely no involvement whatsoever in many of these attacks. The difficulty in combating this form of terrorism is surely due to there being “lone wolves” throughout the world who are susceptible to and feel empowered by the message that ISIL is broadcasting, and who aren’t even on the radar of the intelligence organisations. The growing fear of and backlash against Islam in the west is not because all Muslims are perceived as a threat, it is simply because in everyday life, as on the beach in Tunisia, there is nothing to differentiate an ordinary person from a terrorist.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

Yesterday was a really sad day for all Muslims. What was supposed to be an Arab Spring of hope, dignity and justice for all is turning now into a nightmare for all the Muslims in the region. It unleashed this monster called ISIS that is now becoming a threat everywhere. I put them at the same level of the American and British troops. A bunch of bloodthirsty criminals who are only good when they are dead.

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

And peace to you too. In the long term, the best way to fight is extremism is better education, more equality, less repression, and giving everyone a bigger say in who should govern them. And a constitution to ensure that governments can’t go overboard. Qatar, as the richest country per capita in the world (excluding expats), can be a beacon of hope in this regard, and should lead the way.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Rane de Beer

I don’t think you are talking about Qatar there. None of your solutions will be implemented here

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Hope springs eternal!

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

So let me get this right. Are you are saying as part of this that American and British troops should all be killed?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Those that justify extremism are the enablers of murder and chaos

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I get really hacked off at this. The very people who are based at Al Udeid and the British troops that are called on to step in and help are always the first ones to get abuse. It is always the fault of the U.S. and the U.K. in the Arab world. But wait until there is some fighting to be done and those brave members of the community here will be the first ones to call on the U.S. and the U.K. for military aid as their armies either cannot or will not fight.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Nope. You have to understand that all this mess in the Middle East is mostly the result of American and British interventionism. They wanted chaos and they wanted to shape geopolitics the way it suits them regardless of the millions of innocent people who died or had their lives destroyed by their actions. What is the difference, for an Iraqi, between persecution under Sadam Hussein, killing and displacement under the Americans and beheading under ISIS?

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I take it that you have just not recovered from colonisation? Which of the Europeans got your country? – U.K.?

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Relax. This thread is devolving and Shabina will be coming soon. Conclusion: ISIS is as bad as American and British armies and governments who are keen on killing, invading and colonizing for their own interest and the interest of corporations. Get over it.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I do not agree with pretty much 99% of everything that you say here however what I do agree with is that Shabina’s finger is hovering over the DEL key as I type. Shabina is immune from prosecution for war crimes as she is an internet demigod.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

You still cannot explain why Al Baghdadi is worse than, for example, the American Sniper. The world would be a better place without both, and if it wasn’t for the actions of the American Sniper and his colleagues we wouldn’t have had Al Baghdadi and ISIS in the first place.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Well one of them had a large funeral attended by peoples of all race ,political and religious backgrounds who were free to attend.They lined up highways with their presence.Guess which one?

Akmal farah
Akmal farah
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Stop blaming. No Sir, No one is FORCING muslims to kill one another. Not the US not Europe not anyone else. It is Muslims killing other Muslims, plain and simple.

You are an educated man, “I hope”, stop the America created this and America created that. These people are fighting because since Islam existed, a war between Shia and Sunnis was born.

I am not blaming ALL Muslims on earth. America and Europe intervene in all countries. Now if some political void created some opportunity for a movement (religious to some) to create an Islamic state, you can’t go around blaming USA and Europe son.

Musaab Umayr
Musaab Umayr
6 years ago
Reply to  Akmal farah

Absolutely wrong. You seem to have dismissed the overt and covert operations undertaken by the West in support of regimes, rebel groups and the so called ‘jihadi’ forces over the past 50 years. There was no sectarianism in Iraq before the the Americans initiated their divide and rule policy in Iraq. You also seem to have neglected the reality of the international situation in uni polar world where the US is intent on shaping the Muslim world as part of the Greater Middle East Initiative. ISIS were created to cause havoc in Iraq and Syria and are poster boys for the West in their demonisation of Islam and Muslims. Before them it was Al Qaeeda. It is important for the Muslims to be politically aware to be able to foil the plots of the enemies of Islam and the Muslims.
Furthermore, it is well known that ISIS are run by Baathists from former regime of Saddam. The Baathists were affiliated to the US and still are as individuals now. They are now doing the bidding of the US through ISIS especially when it comes to shaping the new map of Iraq and Syria as well as placing pressure on the GCC regimes to reform or be replaced.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

The divide was already there in Iraq but it was not at the surface. The removal of Saddam and the shockingly weak and one sided Iraqi government that followed allowed it to come to the fore. Now I already know that nothing I say here will make a difference as no matter what happens in the Islamic world it is either caused by or because of the evil Westerners. Shame on you that you are so easily controlled by us.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Using your logic, the dead on the beach of Tunisia and all the other terrorist atrocities committed in the name of Islam must be acceptable collateral damage for the west in pursuit of it’s strategic aims. The world has changed in the last 2 years. The myth of the “muslim brothers” has finally been shown for the lie that it is. The Sunni have seized the chance to establish a base from which it can eradicate both the Shia and the Kuffars of the west, and to suggest the west is somehow complicit in the actions of ISIS is obscene. But of course you already know that don’t you.

May Chance
May Chance
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

So close the Western airforce and naval bases and step in to control the carnage.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

So please connect me to the part where foreign interventions created the setting for attacking a mosque in Kwait? Seems to me it may be a reverse affect because Kwait was invaded by Iraq and then Iraq was chased out by foreign intervention and then allowed to continue on as it was before. Who should be angered over that geopolitical happening?

Akmal farah
Akmal farah
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Lol..wow

So Baathists are affiliated with USA now? Man, USA is full of Muslims. No one is the enemy of Islam. Shiats and Muslims would fight even if no other religion but Islam exists.

It is amazing how you guys understand this world. Muslims kill Muslims and you blame USA. Simply amazing…

Simon
Simon
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Yeh, right – as ever, someone else’s fault – usually ‘Westerners’.

Time to grow up and take a smidgen of responsibility for yourselves.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Over 1 million Muslims died in the Iran/Iraq war – in reality just another skirmish in the centuries old war between the Sunni and the Shia – and not an American or any other western power in sight. ISIS is simply the latest standard-bearer for the Sunni, using the same fear and brutality that has been practiced through the centuries, but now with modern weapons and hiding behind the innocent. Stop blaming the current slaughter on everyone you can think of except the Muslim fanatics.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  The Reporter

When the US is not creating the issue from scratch it is fuelling flames. The Iran Iraq war that you mentioned is the perfect example of Americans meddling in both countries affairs to perpetuate the fight.

May Chance
May Chance
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

So why do these countries welcome and even subsidize UK & US Air and naval bases? Why do the GCC countries and other Arab states not step in when these atrocities occur? They are sovereign nations are they not?

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  May Chance

There is a huge difference between asking for help or intervention and invading. If the US army just sticks to operations where it is called for help it would be better for them and for the whole world.

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

It would also be better for the whole world, especially in the Gulf region if senseless killings stopped as well.The U.S. Is trying to step back but seems to be getting asked to intervene and when it doesn’t,killing continues and it still gets blamed for not helping.seems there are people’s who are persona non grata within their own regions such as the Kurds and between Religious factions as well.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Interventionism? Why were there no battles to oust the invaders as the Middle East “mess” was created? The answer being that the current regimes of the Middle East took the opportunity to cement their own dynasty under the protection of those invaders. It was never a one-sided deal. For how many more years of the Sunny/Shia war will the west have to shoulder the blame?

Bajn
Bajn
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

All the mess is because they left after WW II. It would have been a peaceful place when pearling and herding were the only occupations.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Whoever had blood of innocent people on his hands should be killed. That is the “Eye of an Eye” rule. Hundreds of thousands of American and British troops invaded Iraq and Afghanistan and should therefore be killed in retribution.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

No problem. Can you send me your details so that I may forward them to the Foreign Office. I am sure that there is a watch list that you should be on.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Are you saying Americans and British groups who killed civilians in Iraq should get away with it?

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I am saying that you are a dangerous person who needs to be monitored.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Haha a good way to avoid the answer. Are you by any chance one of those who participated in the invasion of Iraq and Afjghnaistan?

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

You need to understand that the military is not there to make policy or discuss it. They are there to enforce the policy. Calling for the death of members of the military for doing their jobs is silly. This eye for an eye (to use the correct expression) is barbaric and thankfully in most countries people have moved on. I am all for punishing war crimes where they have been committed but a blanket call for death is just not cricket.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

The military are not machines and are not exempt of war crimes because they just obey the orders. The Eye for an Eye rules is just and is practiced in many Muslim countries such Saudi Arabia (and possibly even Qatar). We are not waiting for your assessment to tell us whether it is good or barbaric. If someone kills my son I will ask the judge to sentence him to death. Period.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Read what I wrote correctly and answer again.

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Yacine, if you can’t see the relationship between believing in the much-discredited old testament ‘eye for an eye’ idea and yesterday’s violence (or violence in general), then you have much to learn. If you really, really want peace, then you have to let go of violence as a way of ‘fixing’ things. It’s never worked, and never will. Just ask the millions of Muslims whose family members and friends have been murdered by fellow-Muslims. Or any other people in the rest of the world that have suffered war/violence

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Rane de Beer

Agree To some extent. That said, I can’t see how an Iraqi (or Palestinian or Syrian or any oppressed people) can fix things when a foreign army is coming to invade him and kill his family and steal his land. Is he supposed to open his doors and welcome them?

Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Agreed, the problem is that the USA and UK often also regard violence/invasions as a way of ‘fixing’ things. And it’s also wrong.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

And the point here is to say that ISIS is eventually the result of American and British meddling in the Middle East. I put the blame on all of them equally.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Isis is the formation of the Koran and following early Muslim practices. The UK and US didn’t even exist then!

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Islam has nothing to do with ISIS. This is what western media wants you to believe

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I am sorry you have been brainwashed and know nothing about the history of Islam and early Muslims. I supposed you believe the lie that Islam spread through Arabia, North Africa, the levant and Persia through peaceful means rather than wars of conquest.

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

It is not him that is brajnwashed but you who has been fed stories written by so called western historians to feed the western propaganda. Good luck beliving it.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

You fall into the same trap as Isis, Al Qaeda and the rest that portray Muslims as victims of some conspiracy and therefore they have to fight back and the killing is justified. I suggest you research Tom Holland before labelling such criticism at him. I do realise critical thinking and especially renewing critically the history and meaning of Islam is not permitted in Muslim circles, but that such study and possible revision is necessary.

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You fall into the same trap that the western so called scholars have had since a long time. They declare western civilisation to be advanced and every one else to be backward. But then again critical analysis of their work is not something people like you would do. It suits your propaganda so you can believe those fallacies.

Amber
Amber
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

So I guess you have a PhD in Islamic studies and history?

Camel & the whee..here again
Camel & the whee..here again
6 years ago
Reply to  Amber

No serious scholar of Islamic studies cites Tom Holland and so the writer above is betrayed by that. Holland’s a popularizer writing derivative narrative and taken seriously by no one in the profession (you can check journal citation scores and see that no articles in journals of any repute cite him). He is a sort of Classic Comix version of Patricia Crone. Moreover, by the time Holland began writing the field had already absorbed and gone beyond that earlier work, and especially its fruitless polemical tinge. So apart from his lack of credentials, people in the field had a “good grief that stuff’s 20 years old” eye roll over it. In the years since the entrance and maturing of prominent Arab and Muslim scholars has added useful perspective and they proved willing to look critically at the discipline and even revived a bit an appreciation of the work of the old German Orientalists (who they recognized knew the Arabic language extremely well) albeit through a post-Edward Said filter. I’d advise anyone interested in such topics to get with the times and check out scholars like Wael Hallaq, Imran Nyazee or Ahmed el Shamsy.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

So are you suggesting only muslim scholars of early Islamic history should be read? Surely you must recognise bias in their position.
Tom Holland is a well respected scholar and I am sure not for one minute he would consider himself an expert in Islamic history. However that does not prevent him from writing on the subject in a way that is easily accessible and well researched.

zeit
zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Tom Holland is a well respected scholar – LOL.

The answer is no
The answer is no
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

A careful reading of what I said only points positively at the influx and deepening of scholarship brought about as a more diverse background of scholars came into the field and it matured. The days of the late 70s new historicism ended long ago as an intellectual cul de sac – necessary to read by students in the field but no longer the leading edge of the discipline. And, it is just a fact that Holland is not among that group. He is considered a popularizer even in the Roman antiquities field where he might be better regarded although I couldn’t find any evidence that is cited there and, at the risk of being a myopic credentialist, he doesn’t seem to have the background one would expect there either. But it’s clear his work on Islamic history is derivative at best, didactic the point of inaccuracy at worst, and frankly about 25 years behind when it comes to the Islamic history materials. Just because the New York Times and the Atlantic only discovered it a decade ago doesn’t make it new.

I should correct one thing, however, in mentioning Nyazee. He is actually the same age and from the same generation as Crone/Cook so not really a good example. But I can’t recommend Wael Hallaq enough to people living in this part of the world who want to understand Islamic tradition better. His writing is clear for scholars and laypersons alike. He is a clever and interesting thinker. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wael_Hallaq

HumanOnly
HumanOnly
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

MIMH if you believe that Yacine is the only one who believes Islam is good and that ISIS is evil and doesn’t represent Islam, then there wouldn’t be 1.7 billion Muslims and Islam would not be one of the fastest growing religions on our planet. Many Muslims and non Muslims know the difference between true Islam and who really was the Prophet Muhammad despite the distorted image that haters want to portray. We are living in times where the liar is seen as the trustworthy and the honest person is seen as the liar.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  HumanOnly

A few points. ISIS does represent Islam as I have said before the early muslims would recognise what they do, although ISIS is probably stepping up the brutally scale.
Fastest growing religion on the planet is debateable. I guess you count all those children born to muslim parents who have no choice and are indoctrinated and also those who want to leave Islam but can’t even on penatly of death or being ostracised by their families and community.
I have no issues with Prophet Mohd he was a person of his time, but he was a slave owner and trader, did marry underage girls and was a great warrior whose campaigns killed many people. None of that you can deny as it is in the Koran and the Hadiths. If you do deny any of those things you are the one try to protray a distorted image.

HumanOnly
HumanOnly
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I’m sorry but I do not agree with everything you say. The Prophet and his companions freed slaves by buying them first to purchase their freedom. Read the story about a male slave called Bilal and a female slave called Sumaya or watch the movie “The Message” with Anthony Quin”. The age of Aisha (the youngest wife )of the Prophet is debatable and even if she was in her teens, that was not uncommon for girls to marry in the past in many places around the world. Even in the present, girls as young as 12 marry or simply have a boyfriend and are sexually active in many places around the world and can testify to that from my own family (hint, hint, my family is not Muslim).
Now let me quote these verses from the Quran to tell you how many Muslims believe it describes evil cults like ISIS. Surah Al-Baqara
“And when it is said unto them: Make not mischief in the earth, they say: We are peacemakers only. (11) Are not they indeed the mischief-makers ? But they perceive not. (12) And when it is said unto them: believe as the people believe, they say: Shall we believe as the foolish believe? Beware! They indeed are the foolish? But they know not. (13) And when they fall in with those who believe, they say: We believe; but when they go apart to their devils they declare: Lo! we are with you; verily we did but mock. (14) Allah (Himself) doth mock them, leaving them to wander blindly on in their contumacy”. (15)

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  HumanOnly

Feel free to disagree, it’s just your opinion.

This is for the bible but still applies in this case….

HumanOnly
HumanOnly
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Thanks MIMH.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

So destroying idols? Yep Mohd did that in Mecca. Owning and trading in slaves? Yep Mohd did that. Marrying girls under the age of 12? Yep Mohd did that. Beheading enemies? Yep Mohd did that. Imposing a tax on non Muslims? Yep, Muslims did that up until recent times.

But I guess you are right, Neither Mohd or ISIS is anything to do with Islam.

Musaab Umayr
Musaab Umayr
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Ignorance is bliss! You cannot appreciate Islam or the Shariah rules nor can you have an impartial stance in these matters because you are ignorant and just regurgitating the orientalist narrative. If you want to judge an ideology then you should judge it’s foundations not it’s branches. The branches (Rules) cannot be understood or deemed right or wrong by someone using a different reference point hence it’s a pointless exercise. However, we can discuss whether God exists, whether the Quran is the word of God or if Muhammed is his Messenger using our intellect. But alas, non muslims seldom engage in such an activity because it requires mental effort and getting out of the comfort zone. Life is much easier when one is ignorant of truth because you do and say what you want !

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Would not the world be a much better place if we exterminated all the non-Muslims. Forgive me, I sounded like ISIS there for a moment.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

I’m sorry but the majority of the world’s population rejects Islam and Sharia, from both the west and the east. (and truth be told a lot of people born into the Muslim faith who had no choice).
So what are you going to do about all those people? Kill them all?

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

I disagree, life is harder if you have to bear the consequences of your actions. There is no forgiveness in this life.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Religion is a sedative, physics is a wake-up pill. The universe doesn’t forgive your mistakes, but God does. Now, which life is easier?

Diego
Diego
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I disagree. ISIL were lounging around looking for opportunities to exist anyway.whether those opportunities came out of Box A or Box B does not lessen that their type of future plans for rule is detrimental to anyone in any Country,but especially those in Gulf and ME area at this point. Trace the roots back to Al Queda or before that Bader Meinhof, Red Brigade or Carlos. The purpose is destruction of humans and human value for their specific cause. Sorry, the world cannot and should not work like that. Looking for scapegoats and ignoring many conditions that breed hatred and radicalism and the fact that the radicals themselves are evil, is missing the point.

Michkey
Michkey
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Comments incoming!!

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

What would you say to your Qatari hosts who stationed US aircraft in the country?

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Deleting this comment for calling on people to be killed and subsequent thread for getting off track.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

I think calling for the eradication of ISIS and similar entities/armies is a call for peace, since the world would be a better place without them.

ES
ES
6 years ago

ISIS is like “let’s kill any one that is not crazy and stupid and delusional like us”. I do not think anyone has ever hated Islam as much as these people.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  ES

Actually there interpretation is almost identical to Saudi, so why does no one denounce Saudi for its actions. In fact early Muslims would recognize Isis as being one of their own by their actions

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  ES

Here is a good article on the religious routes of IS

http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2015/03/tom-holland-we-must-not-deny-relgious-roots-islamic-state

“When Islamic State fighters smash the statues of pagan gods, they are following the example of the Prophet; when they proclaim themselves the shock troops of a would-be global empire, they are following the example of the warriors of the original caliphate; when they execute enemy combatants, and impose discriminatory taxes on Christians, and take the women of defeated opponents as slaves, they are doing nothing that the first Muslims did not glory in.”

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

written by another of those armchair reporters.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  terracotta

Actually he is a well respected historian who bases his work on evidence. His study of the rise of Islam and early Muslims is an excellent historical book. (In the shadow of the sword if you want to know. An excellent read)

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

His books are nothing but another piece of propaganda written by so called western historians. The same ones who called white people civilised and termed everything else as backward.

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Those taxes were imposed as non muslims were never part of the army. The muslims formed the army and the responsibilty to defend the nation was theirs. The tax was part of their contribution to their protection.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

If Muslims were taxed in Europe to provide for their protection would you consider this fair or just?

Musaab Umayr
Musaab Umayr
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

They are taxed, its called income tax, VAT etc. In exchange the citizens are afforded protection and services etc.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

They are taxed in the same way as everybody else. This is different to being taxed separately just for protection. You seem to have a good internet connection there in northern Syria.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

But being taxed extra just for being Muslim. That is what jiyza is.

Simon
Simon
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

Well balanced comments from you – enormous chips on BOTH shoulders.

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I love how your great historians represent it on only one side. The pagan followers had tried to kill the Prophet and Muslims on numerous occasions. It was imperative for the muslims to protect themselves. Its called self defense. “Shock troops of a global empire” – Lol.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

No one doubts that the early Muslims were rejected and attacked the same way Muslims today reject new faiths and beliefs. In the same way no one can doubt that Mohd was a very successful general who lead many military campaigns and those that followed him were even more successful. The invasion and conquest of the Persians is interesting reading and the fierce resistance the Persians put up against the Muslim brutal invaders.

Historians job is to present the facts as they are known and then speculate where no firm evidence exists, but they must say it is speculation. Just because the violence of early Muslims is closer to Isis that makes you comfortable does not make it untrue.

Musaab Umayr
Musaab Umayr
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The Islamic conquests bought liberation, light and truth to the masses that were under the shoes of Byzantium and Persian Empires. Try reading real history first before commenting on matters you are now aware of.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Lol. You cannot serious believe that? Next you will be telling me the British empire was the whites man’s burden bringing civilisation to the savages. I can’t believe someone would be that naive.

Musaab Umayr
Musaab Umayr
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

This is a historical fact. Muslims only fought those who stood in their way such as the armed forces. Unlike the colonialists who slaughtered en mass , stripped nations of their wealth and subjugated the indigenous people.
The masses who were liberated by Islam became the liberators themselves and that is why Islam spread so quickly and was able to reach untold of heights under the Caliphate. That is why the unwashed royalty of Europe would visit and study in the Muslims lands and why the Muslims assisted the europeans so often.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Point of order, the royals were washed, the peasants were not. – Just so you know.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Seriously? Next you will be telling me that those they took as slaves of the conquered were happy as they were treated better as slaves under Muslim rule than their previous rulers. I really hope you don’t have children and expose them to such lies.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

Well obvious you need to read more history yourself, the Persians put up fierce resistance against the invading Arabs and we know that from Persian sources not just later western works on the subject and the invasion of modern day Pakistan and India was a disaster for the local population with up to 80 milion killed. Again we know that from Asian sources not western ones. If liberation, light and truth is worth 80 million lives then I for one do not want it.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago
Reply to  Musaab Umayr

The Islamic Conquest also brought light and freedom to Spain, and that’s why the Franks under Charles the Great fought fiercely against them until they had kicked them out of the Iberian Peninsula. But, I forgot, that is Western History. It can’t be true.

Mohammed Albanai
Mohammed Albanai
6 years ago

While this is a tragedy and our hearts and prayers go out to our Kuwaiti brothers/ sisters. The silver lining is perhaps this will force gulf nations to take real action against isis.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

Something definitely needs to be done but the sad thing is that Bashar the thug will benefit from it eventually. :/

Dumber
Dumber
6 years ago

So insane! What kind of mind to they had? Killing is so fetish to them. What are they fighting for?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Dumber

An Islamic caliphate and domination of the world by Muslims. They have been saying this regularly.

Zeit
Zeit
6 years ago

The Americans who were happy to bomb Iraq in the basis of fabricated evidence are now scared to sent troops now. Their arms which they dropped magically reached the hands of ISIS. And now the new claims are that Al Baghdadi was a CIA agent. Nothing surprising knowing well that Bin laden was also one not too long ago.

Huzz
Huzz
6 years ago
Reply to  Zeit

Perhaps it is time that the Muslim dominated countries stand up and show us “Westerners” how it is done. After all, these ISIS thugs are doing all this in the name of Islam so the time has come for you guys to mobilise and reclaim Islam from these people.

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago

May those who were killed be in peace. May those injured recover quickly.

DEEM
DEEM
6 years ago

As a Brit, I find myself accepting, in part, the arguement that the current crisis facing the world is born of American and British actions in the past. I also accept from those more knowledgeable than I, that ISIL doctrine is based on the practices of the early followers of Islam. In a way, I fully understand ISIL’s spoken aims of forming an Islamic Caliphate in the region they currently occupy. I get that. And whilst I find their methods abhorant, As free people, they have theright to expect to conduct their lives in the way they have chosen, unmolested by the outside world – until their methods spill over to the outside world. How does murdering civilians on a beach, or worhippers in a Mosque (however misguided they believe their faith to be) serve the aims of the Caliphate – unless of course, the Caliphate they seek is a global one?
No. These are not Muslims. These are not a peoples struggling free of “western” oppression. These are not the light of the world. These are killers. Physchopathic, habitual killers. They do it because they enjoy it. The blood lust is up, and they won’t ever stop.
At first I was outraged by these recent attacks and my own blood lust came to the surface… had I been the commander of a Trident submarine I would have launched the entire payload right there and then.
But that is not the answer. The “west” cannot combat – let alone defeat – this, without repeating the mistakes we made before, which will only give rise to more sectarian violence and yet another self-obsessed fanatic calling on the faithful to commit atrocity and violence.
It is ISLAM that must deal with these fanatics – Sunni and Shia – lead by the highest authority, backed by the people, the true Muslims throughout the world. The leaders of Islam must stand up and call on every true believer to rise up against this scourge – not through editorials and rethoric, but by actions and deeds. And the time for this action, Ladies and Gentelmen, respect friends of all faiths and nationalities – that would be now.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  DEEM

“They do it because they enjoy it”. Wrong. They are thinking humans, not deranged mass-murderers.They do it because they have been presented with a logic that tells them they must act to protect the sanctity of their religion. It may be a twisted logic that is difficult for non-religious people to understand, but it is a logic they believe in, and for many of them it is a very short step to take from being fervent believer to committed terrorist.

outdoorsboys
outdoorsboys
6 years ago

The historical context being debated here is, in my very humble probably ignorant opinion, self indulgent, divisive and sadly aggressive. Not one of you have even offered a few words of horror, or condolences to all those who have died at the hands of this political faction. Suggesting, from either side of this current soapbox that the actions of the murderous hordes currently describing themselves as ISIS, has roots in anything remotely pious is frankly heretical, and gives those who are attracted to the glamour of waving an AK45 IN THE FACES OF HALF NAKED wESTERNERS

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  outdoorsboys

Yeah that’s how Iraqis, Palestinians and other oppressed people will repel the invaders. They will fight drones and highly sophisticated weapons with pens. Are you also suggesting that ISIS should be fought with pens? Thanks for your intelligent insight.

outdoorsboys
outdoorsboys
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

So Yacine, you are taking up arms? You will fight them on the ground yourself? You and I can only make a difference by using words- persuasion, information, education, opinion, pressure on those who have power, protection of those who are vulnerable to being deceived into this heresy and horror.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  outdoorsboys

We will only take up arms if asked to do it by our countries, and within a formal military operation, but definitely not in the militias style that ISIS and the others are doing. And yes, I agree we should fight with the words, but I think we are already doing our part. However, many Westerners (mostly Americans and British) are not doing theirs. Refusing to recognize the mess their countries created, re-electing the same criminals and not holding any of them accountable, and putting the blame on Muslims is not the kind of actions that will bring peace to the region. Just read some of the comments here and you will see we are years away from any real peace in this region without Western interventionism.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

The simple fact is, this is a muslim disease and it is up to the world’s muslims to get their house in order. This cannot be solved by outside pressure and they need an Islamic reformation and a reinterpreation of the Koran. They also need to stop blaming others for this problem as this just give justifcation to those that commit these acts and encourages more to join them.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Ok how did you guys fight your imperialistic disease which killed and is killing people around the world? May be when we see how you guys managed to cure yourselves from your sheer brutality and aggressivity then we Muslims can take you as an example? Or is it fine for you to use violence and terrorise others but not Muslims? May be you need to stop blaming Muslims/Islamists and understand that you are the main responsible for the bad things that happen in this world (droning, spying, killing, torturing, blackmailing, subverting, lying, and the list goes on).

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I know the truths hurts, but you have to face up to it before you can change for the better.

SokhnaFan2010
SokhnaFan2010
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

A thousand years pass and still the same frustration and aggrieved perspective from both ‘sides’…………..it’s depressing really. RIP all those that have died, whatever their religion, over the last 72hrs. We can only hope for a better future.

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