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Monday, July 26, 2021

Qatar residents asked to look for Ramadan crescent after sunset Friday

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Ramadan moon

With reporting from Riham Sheble

Qatar’s Muslims should look to the sky on Friday evening, June 27, to see if they can spot the new moon, which would signify the beginning of the month of Ramadan.

If the moon is observed, fasting would begin on Saturday, June 28, the Crescent Sighting Committee at the Ministry of Islamic Endowments and Islamic Affairs (Awqaf) has said in a statement.

QNA reports:

“The committee also called on whoever sees the crescent of the blessed month of Ramadan to report to the Ministry’s headquarters at the The Towers (al-Abraj) in Dafna and attest his testimony.”

In the statement, Awqaf said its committee will convene immediately after sunset prayers to discuss whether Ramadan will begin on Saturday or Sunday.

Ramadan is marked in Qatar with shorter work hours and a prohibition on eating and drinking in public during the daytime. However, Doha tends to come to life at night, after Muslims have broken their fast.

Are you ready for Ramadan? Stay tuned for our updates on opening hours and FAQs. Thoughts?

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thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
7 years ago

How long before the comments about being “forced” to fast or being threatened with firing if people are caught sipping water in a closet at work

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Which company actually does this? There maybe 1000’s of misgivings with Qatar, but I have never ever heard of anyone being fired or being punished for this in my 30 years here. Non-muslims were allowed to eat and drink during my school days. Two companies I have worked for so far have also allowed non-muslims to eat and drink. I personally try to fast for these 6 hour workdays myself, but it’s just as a consideration to my fasting colleagues.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

I’ve never heard of it in my 31 years here, but people will write it here

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Very true but the police do fine people they catching eating, drinking or smoking in public.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

But driving like a moron and nearly killing everyone in your path is not actioned by the police…interesting.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

More worse is drunk driving, had to call the police for that drunk westner few months ago.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago

Excellent work…you probably saved a life or 2………What about all the drunk drivers in Thobes who leave the Oryx Rotana, the Raddison Blu etc every single day? When are they going to be intercepted? How bout you asa person with power here, go down to either and get some action …you will save lives…

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Good. I salute you on this one. Drink driving is unacceptable.

I wish the police would breath test those leaving bars in Qatar and driving home. No discrimination though, it has to be everyone.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Of course eating a bacon sandwich in public will lead to lots of Hungry Muslims rioting and tearing Doha apart.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

We’re allowed to eat and drink at my place of work but only in a cafeteria with blacked out doors and windows. I cannot have anything to drink at my desk, not even a sip of water. There are many muslims in my office, all of whom say they have no issue with non-muslim colleagues drinking or eating in the office however we also have the conservative muslims who insist on the removal of water urns and kettles from the office kitchens. I do not wish to offend anyone but I find that type of behaviour to be bordering on hysteria.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Most of my muslim colleagues tell me that they have no problem with me eating or drinking at the desk. They say that, fasting is supposed to be a test of sorts and they should be able to overcome temptation. I don’t know how valid that is according to the Quran though.

Huw Nicholas
Huw Nicholas
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

This is the same in my office. Fasting colleagues also say that it helps then to further understand what those who have nothing feel like the rest fo the year, which is a bit part of Ramadan.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

I feel the same, regardless of what you believe or how you feel, it’s only respectful to abstain from eating and drinking for those 6 hours, it’s not the end of the world and at the very least it’s a nice gesture

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Eating and drinking IN PUBLIC during the holy month is outlawed. Offices are considered public due to the mix of people who staff an office.

Sequestered eating and drinking is condoned for those not fasting. It is about common decency and manners.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

I think it is very unfair to suggest that non-muslims are being indecent and ill-mannered if they eat or drink in front of those who are fasting. I am Catholic and I choose to fast for Lent but I do not expect my colleagues to stop eating in front of me. It is my choice to fast and I do not wish to impose my choices upon them. That is common decency and manners. This seems to be peculiar to the Gulf because it is not the case in Malaysia or India….

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Maybe so, but this is a Sharia state, i.e. governed by religious law. Therefore the tenements of that Law hold sway, not the secular laws of our own countries.

Both of your examples are complicated ones as both have both secular laws as well as Sharia. In the case of India there are multiple bodies of law…

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

Thank you for your reply, Saffa. But if this is a Sharia state, governed by religious law then why is alcohol or pork allowed? I’m not being argumentative, I just don’t understand the logic.

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Economics. How else are they going to wheedle most of our exorbitant salaries from us 😉

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

Great answer ,great.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

Very true. Such indignation about alcohol but no condemnation of the huge profit made from the sale of it.

Jinbaobao
Jinbaobao
7 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

its an interesting point, this is my first Ramadan in Qatar, I am from Indonesia, the most number of Muslim country in the world, in my country we do not stop not Muslims eating and drinking, they are not Muslim so no need for them to do. When I came here and people told me everyone must do I was very suprised and a little upset, for me I not mind seeing people eat and drink becuase when i fast if i can overcome temptation then im better Muslim, if no tempetation then no struggle and i think it is worth less for me. This just my thinking but i want to share with you.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Its a nice traditional and long may it continue, but we shouldn’t fool ourselves that we don’t know when Ramadan starts because we do. We have been able to plot the movement of the planets and moon for the last 3000 years at least.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Traditionalists (like Qatar and Saudi Arabia) require sight by the naked eye
http://islamqa.info/en/110350

Some of the others accept calculation:
http://www.fiqhcouncil.org/node/21

Nobody is fooling themselves, it’s intentional…. for the reason, look at the first link.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Show respect and avoid words like “fool”.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

It is nothing to do with respect and everything to do with progress. Should we all ride camels to work as that is what the early Muslims used to get around Arabia? Of course not, no one is advocating giving up their Land Crusiers. It is the same with this, if we have modern tools then we should use them.

Without understanding basic physics we would not be able to get the gas out of the ground to fund the lifestyles we have now and that physics also applies to the movement of the planets and other bodies in our solar system.

As I said before it is a nice cultural tradition, like Santa Claus for children and it does no harm.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Differentiate between culture and religon, and Santa Claus is not compareable to the seeing of the cresent. Btw @osamaalassiry already gave answer to the confusion your having.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Santa Claus is a deeply engrained cultural figure in many countries and you can’t prove he doesn’t exist.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Ofcourse he exists, he lives in the North Pole.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

He shares a bunk bed with god and the tooth fairy

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago

Only a motley-clad individual would be offended by the usage of the term in the previous posting.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago

the word in this context & usage does not refer to a person… but I’m sure you knew that

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago

Respect from LoveitorLeaveit, I love it and couldn’t leave it.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago

Nobody was called a fool and nobody was insulted. Or am I being a fool for asking such a foolish question? I know, it was a cunning set up on your part, well then more fool you, and since I was foolish enough to fall for it, more fool me.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago

I thought it would be on Sunday. No time to refresh my stocks from QDC 🙁

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Snoozed and lost mate. They are open until 9pm tonight I think so still an opportunity

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

It’s ok , I would prefer to go without alcohol for a month than cope with the last minute QDC madness. If it’s not declared on Friday, I will go in on Saturday.

dubious
dubious
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

I dunno, QDC seems to be the most efficient entity in Qatar and even with huge numbers of people it doesn’t take long to get through.
It’d be nice if they delivered though.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  dubious

I got in on the last day last year and was there for an hour in line and ofcourse had to park a bit away and walk. The line started at the entrance itself. They did manage it quite well though. Delivery! Now that would be super convenient 😛

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Talking about alcohol in a Ramadan related post is disrespectful.

What would you feel when you read your mom’s name and the word “prostitution” in the same sentence? Got my point?

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

Nice way to take it out of context. But to take your statement – are we comparing Ramadan to Mother and QDC ( Qatar Distribution Center- A government run facility) to prostitution ?

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Sigh…

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

Your attempt to impose your interpretation of respect on people spread all around the globe can easily be seen as disrespectful. Ramadan is an artefact of one group’s lifestyle choice, it is as deserving of respect to those who did not choose Islam as Passover, Kumbh Mela, Diwali, or Obon – no more, no less. They are all special ceremonies to some groups, and they will all be mocked by others. This is the way it is.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

My mom strongly disapproves of prostitution in Qatar’s bars. That seems ok to me.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Open today, shuts tmmrw.

Michael Greenhorn
Michael Greenhorn
7 years ago

Can somebody tell me why bars are shut totally for a month here?, whilst in the UAE they open after sunset during Ramadan? Seems a bit over top Qatar, especially with the world cup on…a great opportunity to show the world you are open to football fans needs and wants missed I reckon!

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Good muslims shouldn’t be in the bars at anytime, so I don’t see why they cannot be open for the heathens among us. I don’t think anyone breaks their fast with a pint.

iqxgo
iqxgo
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Kafir is the correct term, or infidel. Heathen refers to pre-Christian polytheism.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  iqxgo

Infidel is confusing though, it just means one who doesn’t follow the speaker’s choice of religions. By that logic, everyone is an infidel to someone.

Michael Greenhorn
Michael Greenhorn
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Yep, I think the UAE has is right…no music in bars at night but they are serving. Cant even watch the knockout stages/final in a bar! Doesn’t bode well for 2022

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago

Gosh it would be great to have no music in bars at night here. Off topic, but why oh why do bars here feel they have to provide ‘entertainment’. Does it never occur to the management that we like to enjoy conversation when we are having a drink…..?

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago

There are many things in Qatar that do not exist or are not available in the way you expect them or have them in your country (rules and laws, traditions, various activities, etc.). I am afraid drinking is not the most important of them. At some point you need to understand that living in a Muslim country means that you should expect different practices and rules for things that go against Islam (restrictions on alcohol consumption restricted, total ban on gambling banned, recommendations on dress code, etc.). If you live here, please respect these differences. That’s better than moaning about them and asking the country to change the rules for you.

It is becoming a bit ridiculous all these comments on alcohol here, and I like it that the government is ignoring them completely.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Good to know, Yacine. I must remember that the next time I’m approached about a mosque being built in my (Christian) country. But you see, regardless of the fact my country is a Christian country, we I don’t impose our beliefs and Christian practices on non-Christian residents.

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Let’s be honest about it. It is not that straightforward to
build a mosque in your town, and no, Muslims are not enjoying their faith in
Christian countries. Just see how Switzerland, France, Malta (where there is
one single mosque), Greece, and others deal with the question of building new
mosques, including ones that are 100% funded by the local community or
international donors, and you will understand how difficult it is. In most
parts of Europe and the US, it is a political suicide for a mayor/governor to
allow a mosque to be built in his community.

Obviously, there are some countries that are more tolerant
with that, but that does not mean that a Muslim expat has to go there and
expect them to change the rules for him. Every country is free to deal with
this kind of things on its soil, taking into consideration the local
demography, the financial implications and the local perceptions towards the
mosque. If your country allows it, good for you and for your Muslim neighbors,
if not than we should accept it.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

There are 60 mosques in my country, Yacine. And yes, I am proud that my small country is so open and tolerant and I never want that to change. No-one is suggesting that Muslims expect the rules to be changed for them. I think you make the point yourself when you say that some countries take into consideration the local demography etc….I accept and abide by the restrictions in Qatar. It doesn’t mean I have to agree with them or not voice my opinion about them.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Malta is a tiny country, how many mosques do you expect it to have?!?

Not since the Muslim armies invaded Malta has it had a significant Muslim population.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I wasn’t aware that Switzerland was a “Christian” country? What do you base this thinking on?

Yacine
Yacine
7 years ago

All Europe is Christian in its traditions and religious practices. Most Europeans also describe themselves as Christians (76.2% according to 2011 survey). This also includes the Swiss people.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irreligion_in_Switzerland

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Which is not the same as having a state religion. I understand, we were having differnt conversations.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Qatar is not imposing their beliefs and practices on Christians, they are just discontinuing the liquor service until a further notice.

Gosh you talk about bars and nightclubs and alcohol like your life depends on them.

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

They do depend on them, this where they reproduce, its part of their filthy life cycle. This is why its hard for them to get the concept of respect.

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago

“this where they reproduce”? what??

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

Ignore LIOLI, Jaded. He just wants a reaction. We know our lives don’t depend on alcohol and nightclubs. Our comments are about freedom of choice. Qatar doesn’t permit it. Fine. End of conversation….

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Indeedy, I’ll put a sock in it. For the record and for the sensible ones reading and commenting, did not wish to offend any Muslims or Ramadan, I think faith is a very personal issue and people are free to go about it as they please.

It’s a shame that many people try to comment in ways that if anything will only cause more upset and division, when this place offers a unique platform that can bring people together that would normally not engage in such conversation or even cross paths.

It is possible to disagree and still have a sensible conversation without resorting to insults and inflammatory remarks. Right, I’m off.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

Totally agree, Jaded. Spot on!

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

LOL, you’re the best.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago

I love you too.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago

Filthy lifestyle? You are clearly confused, alcohol is a disinfectant, therefore promoting a more sanitary lifestyle. As for the rest of your post, it does seem that you are clumsily equating some people to insects – surely such rude and insulting talk could not have been your intention?

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

Alaa, if you read my posts from the beginning you will see that they are not about alcohol consumption during Ramadan. It’s about not being allowed to sip water at my desk in the office. My life doesn’t depend on alcohol and nightclubs. I rarely drink alcohol and I never visit nightclubs. I am simply struggling to understand the logic of the complete ban on alcohol during Ramadan when it is allowed for the other 11 months of the year.

Alaa
Alaa
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

“It’s about not being allowed to sip water at my desk in the office”.

I have been teaching my daughter some humanitarian features since she was 3 years old, and the most important ones are empathy and respect.

Empathy is when you hold your loud laughs at funerals, while you know that you have the full right to laugh out loud anytime.
Respect is holding your painful fart while having a meal with friends or relatives, even if it’s not punishable by law.

So dear Grantley, avoiding having the delicious sip of water in front of your fasting colleagues shouldn’t be considered as a punishment or a breach of your sacred rights, it will be comprehended as an act of kindness and empathy.

Finally, my daughter tells you: When in Rome…

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Alaa

That’s strange, Alaa, because none of my Muslim colleagues think that I am being unkind or not showing empathy if I drink a cup of tea in front of them. I am free to do so in their eyes but I choose not to. I guess it’s down to attitude. Theirs is an attitude of ‘it’s entirely up to you but feel free because it doesn’t offend me’ for others it’s a case of ‘do as I do’…..I know which attitude I prefer. Finally, I tell you ‘live and let live’…….it’s a kind, respectful way to live.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

If the government was to go with Islamic rules only, then they wouldn’t have alcohol or pork allowed in the first place. Why does the country become completely Islamic only during the month of Ramadan?

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

I ask myself the same question every year, Deepak. Again, I have no wish to offend but I just do not understand the logic.

Nicole
Nicole
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

it’s like when christians become more christian during christmas or easter 🙂

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

It’s not just this country, many Arabs in general become a lot more Islamic during Ramadan, so you’ll find the ones that normally drink and/or eat pork (whether in secret or not) will stop during Ramadan while they’re fasting, then after Ramadan it’s business as usual

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

Only a fool would think that drinking during Ramadan in Qatar would be just like it is back home.

Deepak Babu
Deepak Babu
7 years ago

Are you calling all your Emirati GCC Brothers fools? And why am I feeding the troll….

LoveItOrLeaveIt2
LoveItOrLeaveIt2
7 years ago
Reply to  Deepak Babu

Their country their rules, our country our rules, your country your rules.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago

You didn’t say it………so I will……’ and if you don’t like it why don’t you leave….’ LOL

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago

No your country, your dictators rules. You have as much say in the rules as I do.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago

Our country? Them there’s dangerous thoughts of rights laddie, might want to temper them. That’s the sort of thinking that’ll get you in trouble in some countries, doncha know? 😉

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago

well I didn’t think it would be the same as back home (and neither do the above posts), so not sure what you’re going on about

Jaded
Jaded
7 years ago

Imagine if the world cup here was during Ramadan!

Gues 11
Gues 11
7 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

It won’t be, so chill

KJD
KJD
7 years ago

Just think of the money you will save. Then perhaps you could use the money to travel to the UAE for a weekend so you can enjoy beverages in a bar atmosphere.

Plane
Plane
7 years ago

I always find it funny seeing on facebook friends who are Muslim and drink, gamble, etc, but start acting completely religious for Ramadan and then as soon as Ramadan is over, they are back to doing it again. I mean, what’s the point?

Shabina921
Shabina921
7 years ago

Closing this thread because it has turned into one about alcohol (instead of Ramadan).

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