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Monday, October 25, 2021

Qatar retains rank as region’s least violent nation in World Peace Index

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Qatar skyline
Qatar skyline

Qatar has maintained its position as the most peaceful state in the Middle East and North Africa, but an its overall position in the latest international rankings has fallen for the third year in a row.

According to the Global Peace Index 2015, Qatar came in 30th place out of a total of 162 countries in terms of peace and stability.

This is a drop of eight places from Qatar’s position last year, and is 18 spots lower than its ranking in 2011 and 2012, when the country was ranked 12th.

The annual report rates countries by examining 23 different indicators across three broad themes:

  • The level of safety and security within a state’s society;
  • The extent of domestic and international conflict; and
  • The degree of militarization employed by the country.

Qatar’s ranking has been strong due to its relatively high levels of internal peace and stability, a position that hasn’t changed much since the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) started publishing its index eight years ago.

However, its overall ranking has dropped in part because of worsening conflicts in the Arab world, with MENA being reclassified this year as the “least peaceful (region),” according to the report.

MENA performance over 8 years, Global Peace Index 2015
MENA performance over 8 years, Global Peace Index 2015

South Asia previously held the title of the world’s most violent region. But the Middle East has overtaken it due to ongoing conflicts in countries including Syria and Libya, and increasing refugee issues.

Libya this year ranked as the most violent country globally and is at the bottom of the peace index.

Meanwhile, over the past year, there was a slight move toward greater world peace, with 81 states becoming more peaceful, while 78 were scored less peaceful.

However, the trend over the past eight years shows that the world has overall become slightly more violent, with 86 nations recording poorer scores and 76 countries improving their positions.

Out of the 19 MENA nations examined in the report, 13 of them became less peaceful, driven by the ongoing effects of the 2011 Arab Spring.

“A vicious cycle of violence is driving down peacefulness in the Middle East and North Africa,” the report states.

Qatar’s score

Qatar rated well on almost all of the indicators used to score countries, particularly violent crime, homicides, violent demonstrations and terrorism impact. The Gulf country was rated as least likely to suffer from these issues, scoring “1” on a scale of 1-5.

Excerpt of Qatar scores for Global Peace Index 2015
Excerpt of Qatar scores for Global Peace Index 2015

However, in the area of militarization, it scored 3.5 for security officers and police, and was given a rating of 4 for weapons imports.

Qatar’s fragile relationships with some of its Gulf neighbors over the past few years including the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain may have contributed to its lower score in this regard.

Still, though Qatar was among 10 countries highlighted in last year’s report as likely to deteriorate by 2016, this year’s rankings do not support that prediction.

Qatar was cited last year as an unusual case of an authoritarian regime with a high peace rating.

The ruling family’s focus on providing its national population with a high standard of living was given as one of the key reasons why Qatar is domestically stable.

However, it said the state’s low tolerance of dissent was another contributing factor in maintaining internal peace.

Global results

Iceland took the top spot in the index as being the world’s most peaceful country, followed by Denmark, then Austria, with New Zealand coming in fourth position and Switzerland fifth. The bottom three positions were held by Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.

Kuwait followed Qatar as one of the region’s most peaceful nations, climbing four places to 33rd this year.

The UAE scored particularly poorly in terms of weapons imports, for which it was given a score of 5, and a heavy presence of security officers and police (4.5). Perceptions of criminality in the Emirates also scored higher than Qatar, with a score of 3.

The UK came in 39th position globally, while the USA took 94th place.

Libya is flagged as one of the countries showing the most significant deterioration in its peacefulness rating since last year’s index, dropping 13 places to rank 149th this year.

In addition to its ongoing internal strife, its poor relations with some of its neighboring countries – including Qatar – is cited as a significant factor in its drop in the index.

“Relations between the internationally recognised government in the east and Turkey, Qatar and Sudan have soured owing to their alleged material and logistical support of Islamist militias,” the report states.

You can read the full report here.

Thoughts?

21 COMMENTS

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Rane de Beer
Rane de Beer
6 years ago

Just a question: has any study been done on the under-reporting of crime and rate of convictions in Qatar? Are they high or low? I can also imagine people have different concepts of crime/violence, especially when it comes to human rights/labour-related abuses. But on a lighter note, I appreciate your ‘photo for illustrative purposes only’. Two men in a car, one giving us a terrible sign -the irony is that the roads are probably the most violent part of the country!

ShabinaKhatri
ShabinaKhatri
6 years ago
Reply to  Rane de Beer

I hadn’t realized the backwards peace sign was offensive in the UK – so have changed the photo now.

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

It means up yours …

LAH
LAH
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

I think you’ll find it means something a little stronger than that.

Simon
Simon
6 years ago
Reply to  LAH

Yup!!!

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

As we’re not in the UK, why is this a concern. On to other matters, do a little research on Agincourt, archers and the removal of their fingers to get the background. Very interesting stuff.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago
Reply to  ShabinaKhatri

Henceforth it shall always be referred to as “the backwards peace sign”. BTW it’s pretty ultra-offensive

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

“Qatar has maintained its position as the most peaceful state in the Middle East and North Africa”

I wasn’t going to read after the this first statement. That’s not really hard is it, considering the competition it is up against!

Gamer
Gamer
6 years ago

Nonetheless!!!$

Detroit Diesel
Detroit Diesel
6 years ago

I say BS. Qatar has allowed the US to orchestrate the war in the Middle East for years in your front yard via central command at Al Udeid. Thousands of bombs have been dropped from planes that took off from Al Udeid. Also, do you see those B1 bombers flying over Doha? Those are designed to carry nukes, so you can bet they are here and Qatar knows it. And they mentioned the Arab Spring. No negative points for Al Jazeera stirring up that hornets nest? It might not be directly, but Qatar is just as guilty for letting the Americans basically come in and set up shop. Your cushy life came at a price. I hope you’re enjoying it.

Michael L
Michael L
6 years ago

I’ve lived in four countries in various parts of the world and never suffered any loss or been subjected to any crime … In Doha I’ve had my villa broken into twice, I’m subjected to daily bullying and dangerous harassment on the roads and was physically threatened and then chased in a Landcruiser by an Arabic gentleman who I believe was a local because I dared to gently sound my horn to warn him not to crash into me. Peaceful ?

Anonymouse
Anonymouse
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael L

I thwarted a pickpocket in London and had my bicycle stolen in Osaka, that’s it. In Qatar I’ve had my office robbed twice and my tires slashed. Was chased down a road as well by an aggressive young man in a land cruiser who I also believe to be a local. I think that he didn’t like my wife using her cell phone to record his completely reckless driving.

DarkQTR
DarkQTR
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael L

Well, I have been living in Qatar for like 26 years (born and raised)
Literally I never heard an actual gun fire in my entire life.
Never been a victim in any pillage or/and theft activities. In fact, it only happened when I was outside Qatar.
But I have to admit that the driving cultures overwhelming comparing to well-developed countries. But I’m sure “road rage” is not only common in Qatar.

I’m sorry regrading what happened to you though.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago

My biggest fear in Qatar isn’t crime or terrorist attack, it’s that I might have to deal with the police or somehow come up against the justice system – and I do mean that in all seriousness. But back to the topic, given Qatar’s support of certain organisations outside it’s shores I’m not sure it deserves all the plaudits that the headline seems to suggest.

Saleem
Saleem
6 years ago

Why is it only in Doha News that I hear of people “who have been robbed twice”? I mean I have heard of once, and the victims usually take measures to ensure extra surveillance around their property with security cameras and all, yet here it seems like they are describing some poor estate in London.

Peter Pickle
Peter Pickle
6 years ago

In a country of 1.7 million slaves in chains (about 77% of the total population in Qatar), World Peace Index statistics don’t mean a thing.

SokhnaFan2010
SokhnaFan2010
6 years ago
Reply to  Peter Pickle

Nor do meaningless sweeping statements that imply something that isn’t true. There are enough problems here, granted, Kafala is on the list, but no one is in chains, metophorically, or otherwise.

Peter Pickle
Peter Pickle
6 years ago
Reply to  SokhnaFan2010

”There are enough problems here, granted, Kafala is on the list”

Thank you for reiterating my point.

SokhnaFan2010
SokhnaFan2010
6 years ago
Reply to  Peter Pickle

You obviously missed mine however.

سـقـر الأسـود
سـقـر الأسـود
6 years ago
Reply to  Peter Pickle

most of the people who come here KNOW what they are getting into… its the age of internet… and most, if not all, remain here BY CHOICE… Granted, Exit Permit is a real issue, but many CAN leave, they just STAY by choice.

Peace.

UK punk
UK punk
6 years ago

Yeah, the illiterate Indian and Nepali workers that can’t speak Arabic or English and were tricked over the contract were full aware. It won’t be long until your American overlords are through with you and leave your country high and dry. Karma is a b@%?h.

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