27.9 C
Doha
Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Qatar’s Pakistani expats to hold memorial service for children tonight

-

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

The Pakistan Embassy in Qatar is hosting a memorial service tonight to honor the victims and families of the recent Peshawar school massacre.

The public “mourning ceremony” will take place from 7pm to 9pm at the embassy on Diplomatic Street in Dafna/West Bay and is open to the public, an embassy representative confirmed to Doha News.

The event will allow Qatar residents the opportunity to pay their respects to the 141 people, including 132 children, who were shot dead yesterday by militants from the Pakistani Taliban.

A Taliban spokesman said that the school, which is run by the army, had been targeted in response to military operations:

“We selected the army’s school for the attack because the government is targeting our families and females. We want them to feel the pain,” Taliban spokesman Muhammad Umar Khorasani is quoted by Reuters as saying.

The Pakistan chancery and residence yesterday was flying its flag at half-mast, after Pakistan Prime Minister Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif declared three days of national mourning.

An embassy official told Doha News that a book of condolence has been opened for representatives of missions across Qatar to sign and pay their respects.

The confirmation of the public event followed calls made on social media by several Pakistani expats in Qatar to request an event be organized.

In a Facebook message to the Pakistan Embassy in Doha, Tehreek E. Insaaf said:

“Let’s schedule a candle light vigil some where to honor the Angels..At embassy or in Aspire park.”

Meanwhile, many Pakistanis around the world have turned their Facebook and Twitter profiles into black slates, bearing the date of the massacre:

Slate commemorating date of Peshawar school massacre
Slate commemorating date of Peshawar school massacre

Additionally, leaders from around the world have condemned the attack. United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon said:

“It is an act of horror and rank cowardice to attack defenseless children while they learn. The hearts of the world go out to the parents and families who lost loved one in the horrific attack.”

Defining ‘Taliban’

Taliban office in Doha.
Taliban office in Doha.

Qatar has so far remained silent on the massacre.

In the aftermath of Tuesday’s attack, some people have questioned the Gulf state’s support for the Taliban, which briefly included an office in Doha.

However, foreign policy experts say it is incorrect to consider the Taliban a single entity.

Some have suggested that there is a “Pakistan” Taliban opposed to that country’s government, as well as an Afghanistan Taliban group that has previously been represented in Qatar and condemned the attack.

“The intentional killing of innocent people, children and women are against the basics of Islam and this criteria has to be considered by every Islamic party and government,” spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said in a statement, according to Reuters.

David Roberts, a lecturer at King’s College London, spoke of complex divisions within the groups, saying they don’t necessarily respect national borders.

“The word ‘Taliban’ is a great catch-all,” he told Doha News.

Roberts said the individuals who attacked the school were “lunatics on the fringe,” far removed from “the more pragmatic people in the organization who Qatar has been dealing with.”

Apart from acting as an intermediary earlier this year during a prisoner exchange between the US and the Taliban, Rogers said there are few signs that Qatar is currently actively engaged with Taliban.

Thoughts?

99 COMMENTS

Subscribe
Notify of
99 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago

Innalilah wa inna ilahi rajihoon

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago

Inn Lillah Wa Inna Ilaihi Rajioon. May Allah grant solace to the families of the bereaved.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

That part of the planet became a huge mess when the US decided to take care of it. Though it was definitely not a heaven of freedom and peace before, it was way much better than today.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Totally untrue. Do not be an apologist for these scum.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

You have to stop watching Fox News and start watching real news.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I don’t watch that rubbish.

Using your logic should Australia now go and kill 132 Iranian children in Tehran using the excuse of the Iranian immigrant in Sydney as an excuse? Of course not.

Read In the Shadow of the Sword and you will see where these people get their inspiration from.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

“Throughout the world, on any given day, a man, woman or child is likely to be displaced, tortured, killed or “disappeared”, at the hands of governments or armed political groups. More often than not, the United States shares the blame.”
Amnesty International, 1996

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Ok so that is 18 years old but is rather ambiguous. Are they saying because the US does not do anything to stop these acts they share the blame or are they saying the US is responsible.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

By the way your Australian example is complete nonsense. The invasions of Afghanistan, Iraq, etc were the deliberate, planned and funded works of “democratically-elected government”, not a terrorist act by someone who learned Jihad from Youtube videos and forum discussions.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Afghanistan we justified, they were harbouring terrorists and they themselves were a religious terrorist state. The west did not bomb them back to the stone age, they bombed them out of the Stone Age. Afghanistan under Taliban rule was a vicious religious dictatorship, arbitrary murder, oppression, rape and murder of women for the crime of being women. They then exported their religious terrorism worldwide.

Iraq is a different matter. An illegal war for which Bush and Blair should be held accountable. Yes Saddam was a nasty man but the case for war was built on lies.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Right but prior to that attack on Afghanistan, the taliban were the friends of the allies, same people doing the same thing, because at that point it was communism that was the global threat, a noted attribute of which is the incompatibility of religion with communism, so there’s your free, social utopia right there. No one ever died under communist rule

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Communism as known in the Cold War was dead by time the Taliban got control of Afghanistan.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Are you skewing the context and over simplifying and generalizing to serve your purpose and avoid the point being made? Or is a history lesson on Afghanistan needed? The Soviets / Russians were supporting communism in Afghanistan well into the 90s, with the mujahadeen being supported since the late 70s, and they then won to simplify things and became their own government, parts of which became known as…the Taliban. Same people, different name, different political view of the future of the country they just won back after over two decades of war. So your focus is on semantics rather than an actual distinguishing of facts and analysis

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Read up on Russian histroy. Millions died under Stalins rule. Millions.

Look what’s happening in China today. People go ‘missing’ all the time.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

Oh I agree, just highlighting a point that one person who might agree that religion is the source of all evil and problems would be Stalin, Marx ie. Communists, ie. Last centuries source of all evil and terrorism.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

You must be joking that no one ever died under communist rule.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Australia was already involved in the so called war on terror. Their soldiers were there in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Elkhorn
Elkhorn
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Regardless of the US participation or action against the Taliban, the taking of innocent human lives, especially Children, are the most despicable actions. No Religion can ever support or condone this barbaric act.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Elkhorn

Been going on for two thousand years, normally they would kill the men, rape the women and enslave the children of infidels. Now they have just moved onto outright killing.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

you must be talking about the mongols or the christian crusaders.

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  terracotta

I think he is talking about all religion, either Christian, Muslim or otherwise. Fortunately for mankind, most religions stopped this kind of murder 300 years ago.
BTW the Mongol conquest wasn’t based on religious conquest.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

what has happened in the past 300 years has nothing to do with religion?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Here are your heroes claiming responsibility for the attack. I think the Arabic means, “the Americans made us do it”. Correct me if I’m wrong.

Ali
Ali
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

“Suicidal eagles of MSG group standing with TTP’s militant Shura and commander of Dara Adam Khel Peshawar khalifa Umer Mansoor.”

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Here some religious man agrees with you. You’re in good company.

Jaded
Jaded
6 years ago

incredible how cruel humans can be, how soulless do you have to be to massacre children

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
6 years ago
Reply to  Jaded

The children were massacred after first being forced to watch their teacher being burnt alive before in front of them.

How anyone can claim that this is religiously justifiable is beyond me.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Selective reading of various holy books. Many have passages justifying killing, the same as apologist say this does not represent their religion and selectively quote other parts of their books to back their claim.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

While you do the same thing, quote nothing but your own opinion, try to convert the world to your atheism more fervently than anyone tries to convert people to religion on here, try to persuade people by saying religion justifies killing, but on the same hand call them lunatics, if they’re crazy that’s not compatible with your argument on religion. For the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, and all those killings, they seem to also run contrary to your religion theme, as well say all the deaths from say pollution, poisoned water supplies, people who walk into movie theatres, schools, post offices, supermarkets and shoot people dead, passenger planes being shot down by the US, Russia, starvation, dehydration, exposure, malnutrition, AIDS, police brutality, I’m sure a world without religion would see no deaths according to you, and you chide someone for saying you don’t watch fox news? their slogan is fair and balanced, what’s yours? Opinionated and not based on facts or evidence? Or are we to believe you’re a theologist and have studied all the major world religions with an additional deep understanding of scientific theories about life and have come to these amazing conclusions? Tell us more about the appellate process in death penalty cases.

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/19/world/europe/deaths-linked-to-terrorism-are-up-60-percent-study-finds.html?_r=0

I quote…’Afghanistan, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan and Syria — accounted for
four-fifths of the almost 18,000 fatalities attributed to terrorism last
year. Iraq had the bloodiest record of all, with more than 6,300
fatalities.’

These countries (N.Nigeria in particular and therefore Boko Haram) have five main common attributes; poverty, ignorance, corruption, tribalism and Islam. Lots of other countries suffer from the first three or four listed issues, but don’t have the terrorism deaths. Please explain.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

You’ve named 5 variables, you explain. What’s the correlation, significance of each and relevance? Then treat us to a regression analysis illustrating how they affect each other and the dependent variable, which you neglected to define, but if it’s “death” then you’ll wanna show some comparative studies to be able to prove your hypotheses. Prior to that though, you’re going to have to define the origins and use of the word “terrorism”, again from both sides, who’s defining what as terrorism. A lot of the eastern world defines drone attacks on their people as terrorism, whereas soldiers would define terrorism as what? All important factors in framing an argument objectively and supporting with facts before a final analysis. But skip that, the NY times has id’d something that fits the point you’re failing to make

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I have neither the time nor the inclination to write a long reply now, but clearly there are strong correlations between all of the variables or pretty much any combination of……it doesn’t need a long involved socio-economic study to confirm that…in a way, your evasive response says a lot about the problems of facing up to the fact that Islam has a serious image problem, and that it has a virtual monopoly on terrorism done in its name. Of course, it is carried out by a noisy minority and most Muslims presumably abhor these acts, but what doesn’t seem to happen is any kind of unified, concerted voice of opposition to these daily acts of violence done under the flag of convenience of jihad……don’t get me wrong, I would agree with the concept of state terrorism and the US has certainly been the main proponent of direct or proxy acts of violence done in the name of ‘defence’ in recent history (protecting US interests), but the awful realities of ‘realpolitik’ don’t hide behind a faith which is the self-proclaimed ‘religion of peace’.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

But you have time to weigh all the facts, pass a blanket judgement and reason that one article must be true. Fact is that there are over 1.5 billion muslims in the world, and you’ve passed judgement on them all, my defence is not one of a religion, which you seem to miss, but it’s of ignorance and uninformed discussion. There are almost 1 million police officers in the US alone, by your methods it’s more than fair to say they’re all murdering racists because that’s what pops up in the news. Further irony shouldn’t be lost on hiding behind a religion of peace and the comparison you’ve tried to draw with a government consisting of mainly two parties, of which one is eponymous with democracy. Critical thought, analysis have been replaced by unsubstantiated bigoted statements and propping up what one is told is the truth at that moment.

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I dont know if you are a muslim or not, if you are please tell me what you think the acceptable punishment for apostasy is?

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

If you’re that interested, that’s something best left to a scholar of islam, theologian, academic etc. Not an answer you’re going to get through googling

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I actually do know most Islamic scholars answer, and you can get it from gogling. I was interested in your answer, and your lack of one actually reveals quite a lot.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Whatever helps you sleep at night, and when in doubt, gogle it

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I note, you still didn’t answer my direct question. I will ask again, what do YOU believe the punishment from apostasy within Islam should be?

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Duly noted, I’m not here sharing opinions in case it wasn’t obvious by not sharing an opinion

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Again no answer. Let me make it easy for you. Either you believe the punishment for apostasy is death, or not death. Why are you afraid to state what Islam believes?

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

I’m beginning to wonder if ur not the one who is mimh. Perhaps reading isn’t your strong point. I am not a religious scholar, secular or otherwise, neither are (shocker) you! Thus not qualified to answer, so why would I? to represent 1.5 billion people? Or shall I say misrepresent! What I am capable and qualified of, which seems to be one difference we have with each other, is identifying a biased and uninformed argument. Save your bullying, cornering and leading for someone who falls for that nonsense

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I’m beginning to wonder if you can answer a straight question. I am not asking what the 1.5 billion Muslims believe, I am asking what you believe. Although this pew opinion poll, leans towards most Muslims, believing that death is an appropriate penalty for apostasy. #religionofpeace

http://www.pewforum.org/2013/04/30/the-worlds-muslims-religion-politics-society-beliefs-about-sharia/

Chilidog
Chilidog
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

When asking honest questions about Islam on this site (and actually in life in general), I find that people seem to want to not answer for themselves and instead conveniently defer to “scholars.” I’m often told that I wouldn’t understand because I’m not a “scholar” and/or I don’t read Arabic. I don’t want to cast a blanket, but anecdotally I get this a lot from Muslims more than from followers of other religions. Not sure if Islam discourages free thought more than other beliefs or not. Not sure why you can’t think for yourself and have your own ideas and beliefs. To me, that makes you subject to other humans, not a deity, which goes in direct opposition of what I feel a religion would normally promote.

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Haha. Maybe he is a politician.

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Both are same. Mimh has lot of fake ids on other websites. One I could remember is mozasismyhero and lots and all banned as he used to insult religion. That’s the reason he is active here and no other sites to go.

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Did u even read and “understand ” Islam or just picking verses without understanding into deep

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago

I haven’t picked, or quoted, any verse.
Maybe you can answer what the punishment for apostasy is? Seeing as no one else seems to be able to answer a direct question.

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Two theologians in discussion is akin to two bald men fighting over a comb…utterly pointless. Theology is a non-subject, like astrology, discussing the minutiae of ancient texts from a time of near universal ignorance does nothing to move us forward. ‘Scholars of Islam (or whatever faith)’ are simply dictatorial control freaks, giving yet another interpretation of what you think would be clear in the first place, seeing as it is supposedly coming from the creator of everything……

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

#Deep

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Glad you agree…..just goes to show even the most hardened stubborn mindsets can eventually see sense….;-)

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

What I wrote……’Of course, it is carried out by a noisy minority and most Muslims presumably abhor these acts,’
What you wrote…..’Fact is that there are over 1.5 billion muslims in the world, and you’ve passed judgement on them all,’

Passing judgment is something you’re into, dictated by faith, not me…..

OK, here are a couple of specific examples…..let’s take Laos and Zambia, both very poor countries, Laos has a GDP per capita of $3100, Zambia, $1800…..both have long histories of conflict and/or corrupt authoritarian leaders, a lack of universal provision of primary education, exploitation by corporations with the knowledge of weak govts, poor infrastructure etc. etc., but yet neither has any notable history of popular terrorism….some may call the Pathet Lao terrorists, but probably only sociopaths like Henry Kissinger. Now, with no recent terrorism, but yet having been the victim of one of the world’s worst examples of state terrorism in the case of Laos….the ‘secret’ carpet bombing of it during the Vietnam War (its the most bombed country ever), and with those other variables in places, what is lacking? Well, I don’t think I need to point out to you that Laos and Zambia have negligible Muslim populations and thus have no recourse to violence under the banner of faith that other poor Muslim majority countries may have……

Tell me, are there sura in the Quran which could be interpreted as an excuse for violence? (rhetorical, I know there are many) There are many in the Bible too, but why don’t Christian fundies resort to violence at the levels that Muslim fundamentalists do? One to ponder…….

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Who’s to say they don’t and are not represented appropriately or apportioned as being religious fundamental? The premise of the discussion so far, that is: 1. the definition of a bigot and 2. two sides to every story and no one version of the truth.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Why not take into example Congo(aka Zaire), Rwanda?

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

If you need to define terrorism, I would suggest armed men entering a school with the pre determined motivation to murder as many children as possible, in defence of percieved slights againest their deity, is a pretty good definition

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

The main part of structuring a critical argument is defining terms, terms may be supported by examples but are not defined by them. Has nothing to do with the context your drawing a response in, in fact, I haven’t seen a comment to which your reply is contextual

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

I notice your last three posts actually say nothing, although you require mine to be contextual. Well then, please answer, directly, in what context is it permissable to commit pre meditated murder in a school, in the name of religion?

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Ya maybe a bit difficult to understand. Apologies if it’s that way. No one is debating that its permissable, a few loose canons on here are trying to claim it’s permissable in Islam, and sayings its representative of Islam and further of all religions, which clearly is what Im taking issue with, unsubstantiated bigotry

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Can’t you even just agree with that, instead of resorting to obfuscatory nonsense? Or are you too afraid to criticise your ‘own?

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

you would find a lot of them in US by this definition.

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  terracotta

Dont get me wrong, there is a lot of crazy people around the world shooting up schools, but to quote my definition, I think you would be hard pushed to find a lot of them in the US who do it “in defence of percieved slights to their deity”

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

This is a discussion forum. If everyone had to define or prove every term or political view from the outset of every view point we would have very boring long winded diatribes which actually say nothing in the end. Bit like yours really.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

people can share opinions, so let me dumb it down, there’s a difference between opinions which I’m not taking issue with and self serving unsubstantiated sweeping claims to justify an obvious personal agenda. People seem to be blind to the overt racism, hypocrisy and bigotry they spout on here.

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Nigeria where Shell plays a major role

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

As I have repeatedly said I am all for freedom of worship, however religion should be exposed for what it is and not protected as a special case in law. Pakistan is a good example of how the muslim Sunni majority systematically discrimation and oppress those of other religions, Shias and agnostics, apostates and atheists. They have a blasphemy law for which the penalty is death that is used by the religious to bring bogus charges against what they perceive as their enemies, the unbelievers. that doesn’t matter if they are mentally impaired children or old men. Any state that users religion as its core basis for law or being fails it’s people. (Saudi, Iran, Pakistan etc)

Pakistan’s only noble prize door science sees his grave vandalised, his memory expunged from history. His crime? He was the wrong type of muslim.

Religion posions everything.

I’m not asking anyone to become an atheist, believe what you want. However you can do that in private without killing anyone else, oppressing anyone or inciting others to violence.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Oh I forgot to mention Israel. Another religious terrorists state that is not equal for all citizens.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Also not accurate, Israel as a “Jewish” state on paper, historical, religious association with actual Judaism is almost mythical, re. the term Jewish Atheism, the founder of modern day Israel as a Jewish state, Ben-Gurion was a self-proclaimed atheist, who set up….a Jewish state, with a minority of orthodox Jews, half a century later, Judaism is still used politically, while in practice hassidic and orthodox Jews are not the ones in power politically by design

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

“religion should be exposed for what it is…” or rather what you presume it is based on your own bias, reality is not one dimensional, something you fail to mention there. communism is the counter to your claim, as you failed to acknowledge, a political system that espouses equality for all, and disallows religion, everyone is equal. Pakistan is an example of setting up an Islamic country for all Muslims, Pakistan these days is far from the ideal that was set about, poisoned by money, power and the heterogenous mix that was created by drawing lines on a map. So as easily as you say “religion poisons everything” you can replace the word religion with money, power, oil, racism, bigotry (ie. painting all people with broad strokes and then discriminating against them because they don’t share your opinion), patriotism, I mean you name it and people will kill over it, fight over it and die over it, and then arm chair journalists can make bigoted assumptions of how to change the world!

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
6 years ago
Reply to  thedrizzle96

Fox News fair and balanced? Now that’s some fairy tale you’re trying to peddle.

thedrizzle96
thedrizzle96
6 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

Hey that’s their slogan, ie. Their opinion and they’re entitled to it by the consensus on here in spite of it being the absolute opposite of fair and balanced

Ali
Ali
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

It’s a proxy war. TTP was made by US to counter the Taliban in Afghanistan who were giving them hard time which were backed by Pakistan. So US made TTP to beat Pakistan in its own game. Some gullible religious people also came along.
It is understandable that friend of your enemy is your enemy and once in a while you will make an effort to actually inflict damage on enemy rather than his friend. But in case of TTP you will notice they never harm American interests. Although they claim they are against Pakistan because Pakistan is US’s friend in war on terror.
Afghani Taliban on the other hand go out of the way to attack NATO and Americans.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
6 years ago
Reply to  Ali

Not sure I follow you, but not sure I need to – at what point did shooting a children become part of a proxy war with the US?

If the argument is supposed to be that the US are evil and they invaded our land and killed innocent civilians, and in retaliation you storm into a school and kill hundreds of young innocent pupils and their teachers, then what little moral high ground you thought you had just vanishes.

By all means we can debate the aggression between the Taliban and the US, but I just fail to see what school boy and school girls really have to do with anything.

Ali
Ali
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

The proxy war is being played by US and India through TTP just like Pakistan did through Taliban in Afghanistan.
Since they couldn’t beat Taliban in Afghanistan which was backed by Pakistan hence they found a way to inflict damage.
They made TTP in the name of Jihad, people came along, some religious people were inspired by it and money started pouring in.
TTP’s main enemy according to them is US and and they are against Pakistan because Pakistan is US’s friend in WOT but they never every target US.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Ali

Pakistan is its own worse enemy. ISL has so much power and tries to play all sides. The army fights the Taliban and ISL funds them, gives them training.

Blaming the US is what these religious extremists and ISL want you to do, detract from their own power games and their own atrocities.

Saeed Ahmad Khan
Saeed Ahmad Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Us army wherever they go they spread their poisonous venom or let’s say kachra

terracotta
terracotta
6 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Did the guys who gave the order claim it to be religiously justifiable? No. They said its a revenge for the atrocities committed by the Pakistani army on their people. Why drag religion into it?

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

Yet another example of the poison of religion on humankind. Only this week we have murders by Islamic State carrying on as before, a crazed lunatic in Sydney and Pakistan’s recently history as a failed state is just awful. Blasphemy laws used to persecute minorities, the shooting of Malala for the crime of a girl wanting an education and now 132 dead kids. Until human kind can move on from such superstitions and stop defending these scum on religious grounds humanity will not move forward.

Someone commented here it is the Americans fault. How disgraceful to give these people an excuse for such atrocities. These people have been killing in the name of God since before American was even founded. Don’t give them a way out by claiming American foreign policy or drone attacks. These people need to be hunted down and ostracised from society. Do not give em an excuse, this is just the story they use to brainwash young minds fused with religious ideology.

Coco
Coco
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

It does indeed poison everything and makes normal people commit abominations…

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  Coco

Humans have been committing abominations since the beginning of mankind, religion did not poison anything. Islam prohibits the killing of woman and children in war, so to believe that attacking a school full of children was an Islamic-motivated attack is just ignorant. In fact, even the article says “We selected the army’s school for the attack because the government is targeting our families and females. We want them to feel the pain.” There is nothing religious about the attack, it is only political.

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

But yet, putting aside the motives for this atrocity, the ‘religion of peace’ has a near monopoly on non-state terrorism…….please explain.

sicti
sicti
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Human have always find reasons to justify abuses, no matter if it was religion, race, need of natural resources or others. Do not associate these murderers with religions as they are not believers, they are just some monsters.

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  sicti

But unfortunately, they would have claimed to be doing this with the backing of their god, and would have been promised heavenly rewards by their puppet masters for their actions….you simly can’t put your head in the sand and leave religion out of this.

sicti
sicti
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

Then what would be the solution? Get religion outside of law? Do not see it as a viable solution.

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

First of all, take a look at history and you will find plenty of examples of terrorist actions from both religious and political causes (holocaust and crusades as examples). What is the common denominator? Humans, not religion. To say Islam has a monopoly on terrorism is simply ignorant. Secondly, you’re talking about the actions of the few who masquerade as being Islamic but who’s actions are anything but. So to imply that these actions constitute Islam which is a faith followed by more than 1.2 billion people is, again, ignorant. Why aren’t the rest of us committing terrorist actions or even condoning what is happening?

Anon
Anon
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

I’m sorry, you really need a reality check. It’s a simple truth that most of non-state terrorist atrocities committed in the 21st century are done in the name of islam. The IS beheaders, the Peshawar militants, Al Shabaab, Boko Haram, Abu Sayyaf etc……what unites them apart from being human, is their faith, in particular, Islam. Of course, it is their sick, twisted version of it and they are a minority, but they nevertheless get succour and self-justification from scriptural interpretations. Ergo, their religious belief plays some part, heavenly promises of virgins and the like, along with poverty, ignorance, manipulation etc. It’s a huge part of the problem you seem unwilling to accept.

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  Anon

What are you trying to say? I don’t get your point. You want to only look at the past 15 years when Islam as a religion is almost 1500 years old? Why would we only develop this reputation now if this is what Islam is about? The answer: media brainwashing. Also, by only looking at the past 15 years you conveniently exclude the atrocious activities of Europe and North America only in the last century that dwarf anything that is happening now. Let me ask you this: why is it every time a criminal is Muslim the media makes sure we know it, but if its any other faith then its irrelevant? I completely agree that these actions are terrible, but why say its the fault of Islam when 99.99999% of us don’t condone it? Blame it on whoever is doing it. You can find the same type of violence in Africa from drug lords who call themselves Christian, are all 2 billion Christiains evil now? Of course these drug lords don’t get much airtime because most people like you would prefer to hear about how terrible Islam is.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

It still remains the fact that is these self proclaimed muslims were imposing islam in the northern areas of Pakistan and oppressing people. (Mainly women and children). They cannot just set up their own independent state, therefore Pakistan had to take action against them. So in fact religion is the root cause. Why are the religiously minded so scared to give people freedom of choice? (The murder of apostates tells you everything you need to know In that regard)

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Islam prohibits compulsion in religion, we cannot force others into Islam. Everything they are doing goes against Islam. Anyone who understands Islam knows that there is nothing Islamic about any of these fanatical violent groups. Their intentions are political, they want to gain power, and so is the story of mankind. As for your point about freedom of choice and apostates thats a very broad argument and we can go on forever discussing it. But the fact remains that there is nothing Islamic about these terrorist groups and their actions go against the teachings of the Quran on so many levels.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

Be instructing the killing of apostates islam clearly forces compulsion in religion. It may be free to join the club, but if you want to leave they kill you!

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Alright man keep changing the focus of your argument. How did we go from “this is an example of how religion poisons everything”, which we already clarified this is not a religious act of violence, to talking about apostates :/

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

We all know it is a religious act of violence, when killing kids they shouted Allah Akbar and claim their aim is Islamic teaching only in schools.

We need to call it out for what it is.

You also don’t want to debate apostates as you know the koran says they should be killed and that doesn’t fit your narrative for religion being peaceful if it tells you to murder.

dekan23
dekan23
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Again let me quote “We selected the army’s school for the attack because the government is targeting our families and females. We want them to feel the pain,” It didn’t say they wanted to impose Islam on the school. If Doha News is not good enough for you, here is a quote from CNN “Khurrassani, the Pakistan Taliban spokesman, told CNN that the latest attack was revenge for the killing of hundreds of innocent tribesmen during repeated army operations in provinces including South Waziristan, North Waziristan and the Khyber Agency.” I don’t want to get into debate of apostates because we can’t even get on a common ground about the simple understanding of the motive of this attack.

Kingpin
Kingpin
6 years ago
Reply to  dekan23

And why are the army killing “hundreds of innocent tribesmen during repeated army operations in provinces including South Waziristan, North Waziristan and the Khyber Agency.” Because the Taliban are trying to set up an Islamist state in those regions, the same as they did in Afghanistan.
Of course the root cause it about my version of Islam is better than your version of Islam.

Althani
Althani
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

I agree 100%

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

Throughout the world, on any given day, a man, woman or child is likely to be displaced, tortured, killed or “disappeared”, at the hands of governments or armed political groups. More often than not, the United States shares the blame.

Amnesty International, 1996

sadam
sadam
6 years ago

rest in peace little ones

Ali
Ali
6 years ago

This looks like work of Umer Khalid Khorasani group of the TTP. They are very hardcore and believe in killing women and children like Mulla Fazaullah.

A_qtr
A_qtr
6 years ago

The heaviest caskets are the smallest ones…

sicti
sicti
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

This says it all 🙁

Althani
Althani
6 years ago
Reply to  A_qtr

I read this somewhere :p

Related Articles

- Advertisment -

Most Read

Subscribe to Doha News below!

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.