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Monday, April 19, 2021

Qatar Tourism Authority eyes stricter regulation of desert safaris

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Dune bashing
 

Stricter safety standards for those venturing into Qatar’s desert are in the works as local authorities move to improve the quality of the country’s tourism offerings.

The upcoming changes would affect drivers and vehicles, and were highlighted earlier this year by the Qatar Tourism Authority, as part of a plan to offer businesses incentives to establish new ventures.

The QTA wants to initially launch six new projects, one of which is a 4×4 leasing company that could rent out a fleet of vehicles to desert safari tour operators. Successful bidders would receive financial assistance and free marketing to help them get off the ground.

Changing regulations would also give these businesses an edge over existing companies, according to a QTA brochure:

“Regulations are expected to be enacted that will effectively ban private and unlicensed desert safari/dune driving unless the vehicle is suitably modified for the activities and the driver is adequately qualified.

This project therefore offers the investor the first mover’s advantage to provide a service that will guarantee revenue once the regulations are enacted and enforced, as current providers do not meet the requirements.”

New rules

The new regulations don’t necessarily spell an end to desert driving for individuals. An outright ban on the activity would be difficult to enforce and require the involvement of other agencies, such as the Ministry of Interior.

Bullbar for illustrative purposes only.
Bullbar for illustrative purposes only.

This, combined with QTA’s existing role in regulating the tourism sector through licensing private businesses, suggests the new rules are targeting desert safari guides and the 4×4 owners who contract their services to tour operators, rather than private recreational drivers.

Dune bashing and desert driving is a popular pastime in Qatar and many neighboring Gulf countries for tourists and residents alike.

Once dubbed “the graveyard of young men” by one Australian expat, the country’s vast expanse of sand dunes offer visitors an intense adrenaline rush, but the rapid ascents and descents carry significant risks with “accidents and near-misses commonly reported,” according to QTA.

While tourism officials have not responded to several requests for more information, the upcoming regulations appear to be focused on requiring vehicles to be outfitted with safety features such as roll bars, first aid kits, radio equipment and rigid “bull bars” attached to the front of the vehicle to protect its occupants.

QTA documents say “current (desert safari) options do not follow regulated safety standards,” but several operators say they would welcome the opportunity to upgrade their offerings.

Welcome change

Walid Al Jaouni, the CEO of Qatar International Adventures, said that unlike his counterparts in cities such as Dubai, tour operators in Qatar are effectively prevented from making many vehicle modifications – such as installing roll bars and specialized bumpers – by Traffic Department licensing requirements.

While he said he hoped that such rules would be harmonized with the incoming QTA requirements, Al Jaouni said the new measures would be a positive for his industry.

“If we are told, ‘No vehicles (in the desert) without safety bars,’ I would be happy. I know how important these things are,” he told Doha News. “It will improve our business if we can (improve) safety … We would welcome these ideas.”

His thoughts were echoed by Zarina Rajah, general manager of Arabian Adventures.

“It would be great … the security and safety of passengers is very important,” she said, adding she was still waiting for official details from QTA.

However, while Arabian Adventures and Qatar International Adventures have been in business for more than two decades, both maintain modest fleets of company-owned vehicles. This means the firms are heavily reliant on freelance drivers to meet demand during peak periods.

New regulations would directly affect these individuals with access to 4x4s such as Toyota Land Cruisers and Nissan Patrols. They would face restrictions that risk creating shortages of properly licensed drivers and vehicles for desert safari operators.

Driver supply

According to a document published by the Qatar Development Bank, which is helping QTA work with the private sector, desert safari drivers will soon have to hold certain credentials, namely:

  • A valid driver’s license;
  • An advanced overland drivers certification by a recognized instruction institute;
  • A roll-over and simulation driver testing from a recognized institute;
  • A valid first-aid certificate; and
  • A valid tourist guide’s license

These added regulations would likely pose a problem for freelance drivers.

On a busy weekend, Al Jaouni said Qatar International Adventures can contract up an additional 80 vehicles and drivers, many of whom are looking to supplement their income and improve their English while having fun motoring around the desert.

He said many would be interested in obtaining additional training, but added that requirements should be structured in a way that accommodates freelance drivers.

Otherwise, “all the companies are going to be fighting for a (limited) number of cars and drivers,” making it challenging to serve the increasing number of tourists and residents interested in visiting the desert, he added.

Thoughts?

13 COMMENTS

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Pete
Pete
7 years ago

At the same time some safety regulations for quad bike renters would be an excellent move.

Bursin
Bursin
7 years ago
Reply to  Pete

Sure who needs a helmet? If you crash its only your brain they protect.

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago

As a qualified 4 wd driver with Australian government agencies l can not believe that Qatar International Adventures just sub contracts out to as much as 80 drivers who want to improve English !!! Real safe for your customers ! They are kidding themselves aren’t they? How irresponsible is that? Where is their duty if care ?

Scarletti
Scarletti
7 years ago

but sadly no regulation to limit the areas off-roaders can drive – to protect the beauty of the dunes and precious eco-structures !!

Bursin
Bursin
7 years ago

So whilst many countires around the world have banned “bullbars” due to their dangers during an RTA, Qatar encourages their use only to protect the front of precious 4x4s. Road safety anyone?

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago
Reply to  Bursin

Road safety…where ?

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Bursin

What I don’t get is that these are meant to be off-road vehicles, aimed at dune bashing, so providing an exhilarating experience etc. etc., yet none of them have roll cages etc. to protect the occupants in the case it goes over. Now granted the body shell does provide some protection, but not complete, particularly if it rolls down a dune slip face!

Jason
Jason
7 years ago
Reply to  Saffa

What would it matter? Nearly all locals refuse to wear a seat belt in the first place.

Saffa
Saffa
7 years ago
Reply to  Jason

What does it say of us who go on these safaris with them. I’m not talking about a weekend on a run down to the Inland Sea for a bit of a swim and a braai (bbq to the non-saffas) that we do, but the deliberate driving on the slip face of a dune at high speed etc., and paying someone to do it and them not being equipped for a mishap.

I cba about the ones who try to kill themselves, it’s just Darwinian. My only despair in that is often (innocent) bystanders are taken out as well.

Expat Girl
Expat Girl
7 years ago

Good rules on qualified driver, I am just sort of alarmed that this is a NEW rule. I guess I had assumed that these drivers were already qualified, but reading that they just hire anybody off the street who wants to improve their English is a little bit scary… If I ever decide to sign up for a tour, I will wait until all of this is implemented!

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Haha, safety is something we can all agree on, especially in these moderate risk activities, but to dress up giving your friends and relatives the contracts through a ‘safety’ message is disingenious at best, a huge conflict of interest probably and I won’t even say what it is in the last instance…..

Doc
Doc
7 years ago

How about banning children with no driving licence driving in the desert instead? I have lost count of the amount of young teens that have over taken me driving nissan patrols

Net-guy
Net-guy
7 years ago

I am thinking of the five items they mention, and the only one on my top 5 is the first-aid kit.

1) diesel powered vehicles, (less explosive than petrol)
2) properly installed roll cage with proper seat restraints 4-point system (keep occupants safely inside the vehicle)
3) safety glass, (when we rollover, no major shards to slice you open)
4) RF/GPS/Two way radio (removable/ battery powered). (emergency contact)
5) first aid kit to include flares/water/solar blanket .(minor patch repair, survive the ordeal)
my list is just the tip…

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