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Thursday, October 28, 2021

Report: Qatar employers set to hire more staff and raise pay in 2015

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Companies in Qatar appear to be among the most optimistic about their prospects in 2015 than firms in any other Gulf country.

Despite the fall in global oil prices, which has forced many companies in the energy sector to lay off staff or instigate recruitment freezes, Qatar businesses are collectively continuing to expand, saying they plan to hire more staff while raising salaries in an effort to complete the country’s many construction projects on time.

According to the latest edition of the annual “Employment and Salary Trends in the Gulf” report by online recruitment site GulfTalent, two-thirds (66 percent) of employers surveyed in Qatar said they planned to increase their head count in 2015.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

This is the highest rate in the region, and some way ahead of Saudi Arabia, where just over half (53 percent) of employers said they plan to hire.

The comparable figures for other Gulf states were 49 percent in Oman, 47 percent in the UAE and 38 percent in both Kuwait and Bahrain.

According to GulfTalent, the hiring boom in Qatar was spurred after “the uncertainty over the World Cup (was) finally removed and major infrastructure projects (got) the go-ahead.”

Last year, the report said Qatar witnessed a slowdown in recruitment due to negative international media coverage of the country’s 2022 World Cup preparations and “internal pending reviews on the awarding of the projects.”

During 2014, Qatar’s employment growth rate appeared to be among the region’s lowest, with just 38 percent of recruiters in the state saying they were hiring. Only Bahrain was lower, at 22 percent, while nearly three-quarters of Saudi employers (72 percent) said they planned to bring in new talent that year.

Poor retention

GulfTalent report 2015
GulfTalent report 2015

The GulfTalent report results are based on a survey of 22,000 professionals employed by large and medium-sized firms in the GCC, as well as a survey of 600 HR managers and interviews with managers in local and international firms in the private sector. These were conducted between December 2014 and April 2015.

Its findings also include statistics from the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Although Qatar is the second-most popular Gulf country for expats to work in after the UAE, it has one of the region’s lowest retention rates. This is because “the high cost of living and the ban on expatriates switching jobs prompt many to leave,” the report stated.

Figures from 2014 show that fewer than half (48 percent) of expats surveyed said they wanted to continue working in the state, compared to 88 percent of those working in the UAE and 61 percent in Kuwait. Only Oman had a worse rate than Qatar, with less than one-third (30 percent) stating they intended to remain in the country.

More money

While salaries across the region are predicted to increase this year, Qatar has the highest average forecast rises in pay of all states, at 8.3 percent.

GulfTalent 2015 report excerpt
GulfTalent 2015 report excerpt

The report attributes this to Qatar’s “rising cost of living and the need to attract talent to the country.”

While the overall cost of living in Qatar has remained relatively stable for the first few months of this year, the cost of renting residential accommodation here continues to rise at a rapid clip.

According to figures published by the Ministry of Development, Planning and Statistics (MDPS), the cost of rents, fuel and energy went up by 7.3 percent last year.

In February this year, housing, water and electricity, which makes up the largest share of most household’s expenses, went up 0.74-percent on the previous month. If rent keeps going up at the same pace for the rest of the year, tenants would face an 8.8 percent annual rise in accommodation costs.

Oman has the next highest expected pay increase of 7.2 percent, although this is driven by an increasingly unionized workforce that is demanding wage hikes, the report stated.

Across the Gulf, those working in the construction sector are likely to see the biggest bump to their wages this year, with increases forecast at 10 percent regionally, while those in logistics can expect raises of around 7.7 percent.

The oil and gas sector is at the bottom of the table in terms of pay increases, with the regional average expected to be 5.4 percent, according to the survey.

Fewer Indians

Meanwhile, the new report also found that rapid economic growth in India will likely prompt fewer nationals from there to look for jobs in the Gulf this year.

Higher salaries and more job opportunities back home mean that emigrating to the Gulf holds less appeal for some Indians, as they seek employment in their own country, the report stated.

Indians account for the largest demographic group in Qatar, which is home to some 631,000 of the country’s nationals.

The two countries have a long and evolving relationship. During the Emir’s first recent state visit to India for example, opportunities for foreign investment and trade was one of the topics of discussion.

Thoughts?

39 COMMENTS

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MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

I would take any Gulf Times Survey which a pinch of salt, the O&G industry funds and feeds everything else is in Qatar, if it hits a downturn so with everything else. Even budgets for WC related projects are facing cuts. Yes more people will be recruited but on the low income side in construction for the large civil projects, people with virutally no disposable income and no impact on the local economy.
I would expect growth to be modest in the next two years in Qatar, you can even see it now with less cars on the road.

Michael L
Michael L
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Less cars ? Where do you live in Doha ?

Whatever
Whatever
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The Survey is not from Gulf Times. It is from the recruiting agency Gulf Talent.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Whatever

Yes, sorry that is what I meant. It’s good publicity for them each year but totally worthless. If you check previous years ‘surveys’ against actual results then you will see the variance is huge.

Skippy1111
Skippy1111
6 years ago

Lets see, Qatar has imposed a 20% cut in expenditure across the board for this current financial year.
My own state run employee has lost many staff, imposed wage cuts ( ie: decreased salaries, at least for expats ) and is not hiring but actively decreasing staffing levels through the attrition of people being fed up & underpaid.
The costs of living in Qatar have risen, traffic is horrendous and accommodation is financially non-viable for many, given the high rents and willingness to have a lot of empty apartments due to not having the right sort of tenants.
If there is an increase in workers it will be in construction, low paid construction..perhaps another 400 WC stadium workers to replace the 400 so far killed.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Skippy1111

GulfTalent is an employment agency and sounds more like a as for them than anything else.

The Reporter
The Reporter
6 years ago

so funny when we sit opposite the Client who knocks the inflation element out of our estimates because “there is no inflation in Qatar”. The Gulf Talent survey adds to the major cost management firms who have been predicting the same for the last three years.

Daniel Schriefer
Daniel Schriefer
6 years ago

It looks more like a propaganda coup of Gulf Talents to attract more customers.

Win
Win
6 years ago

Expected average payrise is 8.3 % and expected yearly rise in accommodation cost 8.8 % ( which is a conservative figure ); which will rise further as 2022 gets closer. All other figures in the article are nothing but window dressing.

Expat77
Expat77
6 years ago
Reply to  Win

My company has not raised salaries since 2009. This is the normal scenario in pvt sector. .

Win
Win
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat77

As an expat that must be tough.

al-Lalal
al-Lalal
6 years ago

The recruitment agencies and professionals are not unlike stockbrokers. They need high staff turnover to stay in business. Staff retention is therefore a low priority

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  al-Lalal

recruitment agencies trade in human misery. They are not they to find you a job or help an employer, they are there to moneitse you.

MafeSaenz
MafeSaenz
6 years ago

Where this survey was conducted? Because where I work many jobs have been cut and haven’t had salary raise x 2 yrs …. supposed to be a “prestigious Engineering company” … but we are as slaves as many others. And if you ar3 wondering why I don’t quit if I’m not happy … well … there are bills to pay!

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MafeSaenz

Then be happy and keep quiet. It is people like you with their stupid loans who make unscrupulous managers keen on enslaving their employees. This will be a lesson for you to live by your means or spend your life a slave, if not of your employer then of the bank.

Expat77
Expat77
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Even without any type of loans private companies can enslave us using all the loopholes in Labour laws.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat77

It is a completely different story and you can eventually leave if you do not like it. Here he is saying that he cannot even leave.
He put himself in this dire situation and he has only himself to blame

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat77

I don’t think you call them loopholes, it’s just the labour law!

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MafeSaenz

Don’t edit your comment completely and make us look like we are commenting on a different story. You don’t seem to know the basic etiquette of commenting on DN.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago

As far as I can see there will be more technical jobs and less admin ones. Admin, HR, marketing and services-related tasks can be automated or offered to locals who are not highly educated. Therefore there isn’t really a need for expats to do them. That is what many companies learned recently, that is why they are trying to limit the damage, by firing expats or transferring them to other more useful departments.

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

‘or offered to locals who are not highly educated’
Ow, that will upset some people…. I guess you mean the locals that have low academic achivement, rather than all locals are not highly educated…

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Come on the meaning is clear. That’s how we call people without a university degree. There is nothing offensive in it. And obviously it does NOT apply to all locals 🙂

qatari
qatari
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

not offensive at all , MIMH just being his all knowing & commenting on every thing self.
some ppl just have issues .LOL

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Thanks for clarifying this 🙂

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

In English it could be considered offensive that statement and the majority of people on this site are not native speakers. In English it could be seen as impying that ‘not highly educated’ people are stupid.
In English we would say, ‘or offered to locals whom are not university educated’

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Here is an English newspaper using the word. They did not seem to find it offensive:
“Even if not highly educated, employees generally perceive a kind of psychological contract, and if that is not fulfilled, serious unhappiness arises rapidly. ”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/2896558/Why-workers-across-the-EU-are-simply-giving-up.html

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

Yeah I’m not sure why they’re so bothered.

Grantley
Grantley
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

You think the fact that someone doesn’t have a university degree means they are ‘uneducated’? How ridiculous. Going to high school qualifies you as being ‘educated’. In any case, you don’t need to attend University to be a success – Abraham Lincoln, David Geffen, Sir Richard Branson, Sir Alan Sugar, Andrew Carnegie, Steve Wozniak – the list of successful entrepreneurs who did not attend university is endless.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

For God sake learn how to read. My point is clear and I have explained it further. I am not responsible for how you interpret my words and if you are offended it is your problem. No apologies.

Grantley
Grantley
6 years ago
Reply to  Yacine

I interpret your words as written. May I suggest you learn the proper use of English grammar. What you should have said in your original post was ‘Admin, HR, marketing and services-related tasks can be automated or offered to locals who do not have HIGHER education’. Your incorrect use of grammar gave the sentence a different meaning.

Yacine
Yacine
6 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Thanks for kindly pointing out my mistakes. I am not a native speaker so I am afraid I do make some mistakes (if not many) when I comment. Please bear with me.

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Same thing.

Expat77
Expat77
6 years ago

While living costs have grown last several yrs most private companies have not bothered to raise salaries and wait for Kafala changes to raise salary at the last moment.

Junais Ahmed
Junais Ahmed
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat77

When the labour laws change, still there wont be raise in salary, every one will be on streets with CVs in there hand looking for job. so Employers can get 100s of employees if you leave

johnny wang
johnny wang
6 years ago

………..perhaps another joke I suppose, like the ones which keep on being said every now and then

Daniel
Daniel
6 years ago

I think this must work purposely with the private employers because i
was once working in D.P.C and was being paid QR700 as my basic salary
and was very bad to feed my family and myself on so i came back to Ghana
on may 19, 2014, i contacted one of my friends there just last month
and said their salaries has been increased to QR800 as they spend 2
years now in Doha,meanwhile they feed themselves and buy gas on their
own and do you think that was a good increment? People from Ghana are
willing to work in the Gulf countries but looking at the salaries, is
not appreciative so am sending this to the Qatar government to check on
the private employers most on their salary payments. Peace.

madhaw gyanwali
madhaw gyanwali
6 years ago

i am from Nepal. I came in Nepal before 7 months from Qatar of cancel visa. But I worked in Qatar 7 years. I want to go Qatar again for working visa , this is possible or not ?.I m confuse about this because 2 yrs ban for visa. can u reply me ? Thanks.

madhaw gyanwali
madhaw gyanwali
6 years ago

Please give me the answer of my question , because i m confused about go to Qatar after 2 yrs or after six months. ? Thanks.

Victoria Melbourne
Victoria Melbourne
6 years ago

I wasted eight years in Doha waiting for that change to happen, the only change was more construction noise at home and more traffic congestion to work, no salary increment. My advice to those wanting to move to Doha: don’t expect a bed of roses.

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