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Tuesday, August 3, 2021

SEC: Nine new private schools in Qatar expected to open in September

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For illustrative purposes only
For illustrative purposes only

Parents in Qatar who are still scrambling to find school spaces for their children could see some relief in the coming weeks, a senior official at the Supreme Education Council (SEC) has said.

Nine new private international schools are in the process of obtaining final government approvals and are expected to open in time for the 2015-16 academic year, said Aysha Saleh Al-Hashemi, the assistant director of private school affairs at the SEC’s education institute. She spoke to Doha News today following a press conference at the SEC’s West Bay/Dafna headquarters.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.
Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Al-Hashemi declined to name any of the schools, but said the “majority” will follow the British curriculum and that some 5,000 new student spaces are expected to be created. She also suggested most will be located outside of central Doha in outlying communities such as Al Wakrah.

Al-Hashemi said many of the schools are waiting for approvals from other government offices, such as a sign-off from the traffic department saying that the area around the school can safely accommodate the volume of vehicles dropping off and picking up students during peak periods.

She said she hoped to make a formal announcement and provide details about the schools within two weeks. Most students in Qatar will start the new academic year on Sept. 6.

Space shortage

As Qatar’s population continues to rapidly increase, some parents have said that they’ve struggled to find school spaces for their children.

For illustrative purposes only
For illustrative purposes only

However, Al-Hashemi said there is an adequate number of schools for the country as a whole.

While there are a sufficient number of British and American schools, there is currently a shortage of spaces in Indian, Syrian and Egyptian schools as well as for other curricula in some specific areas of the country.

In February, the SEC announced 14 new Indian schools were scheduled to open in an attempt to help meet the demand, which has seen enrollment at one school, MES Indian School, soar to 10,476 – almost double the permitted number of 5,400 students.

No further update has been given on these new schools.

Al-Hashemi said the SEC is working to make it easier for investors to open new international schools in Qatar and is also creating an online portal to allow residents to search for schools that teach a specific curriculum.

In the meantime, she said parents who are still searching for school spaces are encouraged to contact the SEC for assistance.

Al-Hashemi said the most recent figures show there are more than 262,000 students enrolled in 433 schools across the country. That includes:

  • 102,426 students in 191 independent (government) schools;
  • 146,188 students in 155 private schools; and
  • 13,584 children in 87 private kindergartens.

Comparable figures for the previous year were not immediately available.

Independent schools

The SEC also announced on Sunday that it would make changes to the standardized testing system in Qatar’s independent schools, which are primary for Qatari students.

For illustrative purposes only
For illustrative purposes only

In July, many residents expressed outrage over a sharp increase in the number of high school students who failed their exams.

Some of the frustration came from students receiving relatively high exam scores throughout the year, but coming up short in their finals.

Al-Hashemi said the SEC would be working more closely with individual schools and teachers to develop more consistent evaluation criteria.

Additionally, exams for grade 12 students will be administered solely by the SEC at the end of the first and second semesters. Currently, they are tested separately by their individual schools and the SEC.

Separately, Al-Hashemi said the SEC planned to open a new training and support center for educators in Qatar teaching students with disabilities or special needs.

Thoughts?

131 COMMENTS

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qatari
qatari
5 years ago

are those schools being funded by the government or the embassies ?? if its by the government that’s a waste of public money.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Philosophically and legally, is there such a thing as ‘public’ money in Qatar? On a practical level though, it is a wise investment. Recruiting people to Qatar is so damn hard, anything that is hinders that, such as lack of schools, drives up costs off all projects. Adequate schools makes recruitment less bothersome, making it easier to get the staff.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

i don’t know what philosophy have to do with the topic , but yes there is (public money ) , nothing wise in building schools the don’t have qatar schools curriculum or qatari students in them . we are talking about schools for different countries , not just one international .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Every question has a philosophical underpinning my good man. Yes, I understand the types of schools. I don’t see how it isn’t wise. It reduces the ‘Qatar premium’ and makes it less difficult to recruit and retain staff. As long as Qatar continues down the demographic and societal organization path that it has chosen it will be necessary to provide these sorts of facilities. The only alternative is for a foreign workforce with no families at all; the decision has been made not to do that, hence the need for schools and healthcare. Give this choice, the the rationale for the schools seems pretty simple to me.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

have you read whats above ?? 14 Indian schools, Egyptian schools , etc .
no where when an expat apply for his working visa a paragraph says that the government will provide his kids with private schooling , that fellows his own country curriculum , its a cost to the government that can be avoided. embassies can fund their own .not the government .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Yes, I did read it. I ask you the same question, did you read what’s above? The Qatar government designed this system. The Qatar government has laid this demographic foundation. It is certainly a cost that can be avoided with a complete redesign of Qatari society, but that is for the government of Qatar to decide – they have decided that it is a cost worth paying. I would imagine that their logic is very similar to mine above. If you are not happy with it, take it up with the government of Qatar; maybe you will be able to start a change.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

its not a Qatari demographic foundation . ppl in this case are expat , not Qatari nor immigrants. ppl temporary staying in Qatar until they are done with their jobs. the issue is economical. now Qatar have money, maybe not for long . in coming years locals will conciser it a waste of money, for me why have a problem in the future that can be avoided in the present.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Yep, we agree then that they are part of the society of Qatar while they are here. There is soooo much money that we could consider wasted in Qatar – the military buildup, 2022, QF/Education City, overseas healthcare for Qatari nationals, overseas scholarships for grossly underqualifed Qataris, spending by the QIA on vanity investments overseas that don’t make any money, subsidized utilities and housing, gross waste on luxuries for the royal family – the list is practically endless.

The fact is that these people are needed for Qatar’s economic growth. It is incredibly difficult to recruit people to Qatar and even harder to keep them. Companies need ways to recruit and retain employees – you know, those people who keep the economy going. They have spoken to the government and the government is doing this to help keep the economy going. The return on investment for these schools is fantastic.

We are probably in agreement that the days of easy money for Qatar are quickly coming to an end – all the more reason to develop a diversified workforce, which Qatari nationals are not able to do on their own.

Also, this is a great way for the Qatari government to funnel money to Qatari nationals. All these schools are owned by Qataris and the profits being made by them go back to Qatari nationals. Government pays to build these schools, gives them to private Qatari companies to run, who then charge extortionate rate to the parents. Really, it is a way to subsidize businesses owned by Qataris. Keeps everyone happy.

Finally, many international school students are Qatari. For whatever reason their parents have chosen for them not to be educated in Qatar curriculum schools.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

your not making any sense , money spent on Qatari are money of the public . so its not a waste because its spent on the current & future ppl of Qatar .spending money on ppl how are here on temporary jobs . who don’t pay Tax , nor the Qatari economy who is based on oil & gas (which is not really depending on the majority of them expat ) . so yeah its a waste especially schools where those kids are not considered a factor in the working force in Qatar . just more population

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Mmmm, I see. If you go to university one day you might enroll in some economics courses for fun if they are not required for your major. They will cover topics like this and will be able to explain the topic in more detail. The short explanation is that to move from being a rentier state Qatar needs to diversity, to do this it needs foreign labour. It is more efficient to have labour that is invested in the country rather than a huge population of FIFO, not to mention being more socially stable. To achieve this stability you need to encourage people to stay, one way to do that is to have families. These families grow the economy through consumption, all which benefits companies that are owned by Qataris.

Chilidog
Chilidog
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Oil & gas income (which is pretty much all Qatar has to rest on) is not dependent on expats? So you’re saying there are enough competent locals to run all the extraction and processing facilities from top to bottom in order to keep that fat paycheck rolling in?

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

not much are needed , all those kids in school are not considered valuable to Qatars economy . they are not a working force nor paying Tax .what are they doing for QATAR ???

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Consuming, and consuming a lot! Where do they consume from? Oh yeah, from Qatari owned businesses. Income from consumption is much more stable than that from natural resources.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

when they are not working & not paying tax , when they need more the one private school , uses public facilities . that s un needed Consuming

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

That private school is built by a Qatar company and then run by a Qatari company for years, making money for the owner all the time. That school contracts buses and catering companies, from other companies owned by Qataris, making them more money, etc, etc, etc.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

but then you would have to get non Qatari teachers / staff to run those , more ppl Qatar can live with out.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

LOL every statement you make reinforces the idea that Qatar CANNOT make do without expats. LOL

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Actually Qatar can live without expats, it just means Qataris would have to accept a lower standard of living. I wonder how many are willing to make that exchange.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

It would be a lot more than a lower standard of living. Who would get the gas out of the ground? Big one here… Who’s going to put the gas in the LCs? Who’s going to buiid the building and who’s going to clean them? Roads, airports, seaports, …anything? who’s going to be the waiter, the busboy the cashier? Slippier slope than you think.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Exactly my point, these staff run those, they all consume and buy from Qatari owned companies, making Qataris wealthier. There is really very little to discuss from an economics point of view, consumption makes the economy grow and leads to more consumption.

If your argument is whether Qatar should have taken this path – whether it would have been better off with choosing not to have an overwhelmingly expat population. Well, that is a different conversation, but the decision has been made by your leaders. However, to say that the expats don’t contribute to Qatar’s growth is just plain wrong. This is the economic model that Qatar has chosen, it is just the way it is.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

you are talking about Qataris merchants. not the government nor the regular Qatari . expat still are not a big growth to the country , we are still oil & gas depended country .the government is not really getting back much when its paying for billions of dollars worth of roads / hospitals etc . you are not saying a government that is not taking tax from expat are making billions of them , are you ?

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

One more time Mr Qatari. What is your solution? Know that… To get expats you need to provide for their families. They will not come without their families. This includes housing, healthcare and education. And a high wage. I guarantee without the high wage a vast majority would not come to this place. This ain’t Paris. So come on give me your solution. Keeping in mind these set in stone variables. After this I cannot comment anymore as you’re giving me a headache. You can lead a horse to the water but you can’t make him drink I guess.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

many come with no families , many of expat cant find work at their own countries , many come to work , really work . not like some .just wanna take advantage . talking to you was fun . now go drink your water .

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

This is getting tiring, not to mention incredibly frustrating. ‘Regular’ Qataris are the merchants – mostly small business people. To get away from being and OG dependent country the domestic economy needs to grow. The fastest way to do that is through increased consumption.

As for tax, yes, I agree that there should be a VAT or GST type tax of around 3% or so on every purchase made in the country by every person. Consumption taxes provide a stable and predictable source of government income. You will see it one day, though it may take a number of years.

The government makes very little directly off of expats, this is true, but the economy and Qatari businesses make a great deal off of them.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

Regular Qataris are the merchant ??? really . still not the case here . thanks for saying government don’t really make a great deal out of expat. its totally not true with all the spending to accommodate more than a million expat in qatar.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Well, to be frank the government does’t make much out of Qataris either. That will change for both parties with a consumption tax.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

What are you trying to say – that you disagree with the way the government is spending money on expats? Subversive!

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

More like 2 million but who’s counting.

Misha
Misha
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

You have done a great job patiently explaining the “big picture” benefits…”you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink”.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Really?

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Just consider it the cost of doing business my friend. We’ve laid it all out for you. It’s your turn to read and comprehend. It’s pretty obvious really.

Chilidog
Chilidog
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

You’re just repeating yourself without reading and comprehending the replies back to you. My point was that there is no way Qatar could sustain itself with only locals (do you disagree?). Now, to your question as to what the kids in school do for Qatar: If those kids are in school IN Qatar, as opposed to in their home countries, they are incentive to attract and hire the best minds and experience possible. No one wants to split up their family, so these schools run by locals, who I’m sure make a pretty penny from them, are integral to international recruitment. International recruitment is essential to Qatar’s economy (refer to my original point). But now I feel like I’m repeating what others in this discussion have already eloquently stated……

Backwards Development
Backwards Development
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Without the core mass of expats here the new malls and hotels that are coming online would not make money and thus would never be built. The restaurant variety would be limited, as would the entertainment options, property development aimed at expats would be virtually non existent, coffee shops would not have as many customers, the economy would not have as much disposable income to go around and the list goes on. These expats will not come without schools.

With a population base of around 350,000 there are simply not enough Qataris to sustain this type of development. Who owns the businesses and companies that thrive on this development and population increase – the local population who grab these opportunities. Invest in a good quality school – it’s like money in the bank.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago

when Dubai has its financial crisis , expat were on the 1st flight out. why build around ppl how can pack their stuff & leave the next day .

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Like Qatari’s wouldn’t do the same if it all imploded here. I’d be hard pressed to find a flight out with all the thobes/abayas in front of me.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

we have loyalty , something you may lack

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

lol

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Thank you for playing. Come back when you’re better prepared.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Your whole reason for posting on this discussion was to call the government wasteful, and to criticize it for spending so much public money on these schools.
Perhaps at the school you went to you learnt a different definition of ‘loyalty’, but going online to bag the Qatari government over and over and over again isn’t loyalty in my book.

Misha
Misha
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

You don’t have to agree with everything your government says and does to be loyal. In fact sometimes criticism comes out of a love for our country to be better or to bring about change.

Loyalty to me isn’t about blindly praising a govt and flag waiving. It is about working hard and doing your best when you are working (specifically for a govt entity or semi govt).

When you are given a job/position and instead chat all day, don’t show up, leave early or try to cheat the system then not only is that indirectly stealing from the government but very unpatriotic if one doesn’t want to improve their country.

If one doesn’t like his job that is fine, he can resign, that I can respect. However the ones that barely do their job do not realize how they are collectively damaging their country. They also are cancerous to the work ethics of the hardworking Qataris and expats around them that can and do become demotivated by this.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I’m calling the QSS to report your subversiveness. No one can say such things about my present country of residence’s government and get away with it. I have loyalty.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

No need to call anyone. What he has said online has already been noticed and logged by the relevant authorities!

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

“When”? You realize Dubai still has a financial crisis, right?

The UAE is expecting its first fiscal deficit of 2.3% of GDP since 2009 this year. Things are getting worse, not better.

Throw down roots
Throw down roots
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Exactly… give people a reason to stay and a chance to lay down roots in a country and expats will become a part of that country’s progress and they will likely stay and weather all crisis’s that come along.

Pete
Pete
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

If there was no place for the kids in school, the parents wouldn’t be here contributing to the economy…it’s that simple.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

To develop a viable long term economy, Qatar needs a base population of a certain size to be self sustainable. Qataris population will not be enough, so the country needs foreigners to make the economy viable post gas. The government knows that and encourages expats to come and stay long term but they will not admit it to their citizens.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

He’s being polite in his words. In terms you might understand then… Fact is most Qatari’s do not work nor have the inclination to do so. That said a huge expat work force is needed to run this place from top to bottom. To have qualified people you need to make allowances for their families which includes housing, healthcare and yes, education for their children. Not sure where the confusion arises.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

sorry , a company hire ppl , but the government in no case responsible of providing him with private schooling or private health care. name a country that states in her visa application that they provide expat with Private schooling&health care . public ones every body have the right . private , i dont believe so

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Indeed, but clearly your government feels this is a wise investment. Perhaps you know better than them, perhaps not, but they are the ones who made the decision. You are right though, in most economies the companies would carry the burden of providing the perks needed to attract staff. However, in the case of Qatar the government has taken on that burden for private companies. Why? Well, I suggest because it benefits Qatar and Qataris far more than the cost.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

how having different nationality schools helps Qatar or Qataris.??? student there are not a working force in Qatar nor paying tax.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Hopefully, they go on to become the workforce, and as mentioned repeatedly, they consume.

Think of it this way, why does Qatar want to become a tourist destination? What good are tourists? They don’t work and they don’t pay tax – they must be a huge burden, right? What they are good at is consuming.

Children are the same, every child is a little consumption machine. All their clothes, medicines, food, toys, trips, yada yada yada has to be bought and paid for. Where do the parents buy all of this? Every purchase at Doha Toys Town benefits the Qatari owner, every tank of gas bought for a school run benefits the Qatari owner, every riyal of rent paid benefits the Qatari owner. The non OG sector of the Qatar economy would die overnight if the expat families went away, there are just not enough Qatari nationals to sustain it, let alone make it grow.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

so tourism / expat will provide Qatar the billions it spends annually , we saw how expat fled Dubai in its financial crisis , its only the oil& gas money what got it back on its feet, wasnt tourism nor its loyal ran away expats.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I guess you are all in favour of the 5,000,000,000 QAR that will be spent so a bunch of foreigners can play a few football matches for a few weeks? Because that’s a ‘good investment’?

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

actually that would be QR 76,650,000,000

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Really, has it gone that high?

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

$21 billion

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

I doubt that the original poster is aware of the lack of return on large events like the Olympics and what not.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Of course it won’t, tourism will supplement, not replace, OG. We agree that Qatar’s wasteful spending needs to be stopped. The oil and gas industry is unreliable, and when Iran starts adding to the market in the very near future it will become even more so. Hence the need for a consumption tax as mentioned above. Eventually (we are talking the next couple of decades) I think that Qatar will have no choice but to introduce taxation for all. I see first a consumption tax and then some form of income tax.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

Although I think we do pay a tax of sort with the crazy high prices of everything here.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Oh yeah, the costs, of whatever type, are always there.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

I think we are much more likely to see a substantial increase in the price of petrol before we see a value added tax in Qatar. We can probably expect increases in the cost of electricity/water, and nationals will shortly start to get charged for utilities too.

Ponder this statistic for a little while – Qatar’s exports (ie mostly oil and gas) is down by a huge 40% when we compare July 2015 with July 2014. Ouch.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

Good point, but I don’t see it as an either/or situation. I predict that we’ll see the UAE consumption tax within two years, Qatar will watch and ‘mull’ for 3 years, and then introduce their own version. The thing is, any reasonable in crease in gas and utilities would probably not be enough to cover the cost of their production and distribution. For the general fund it will need to come from elsewhere.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

If they do implement a tax I dare say the american expats would probably disappear. I’m sure that would make some happy but we are already taxed at home. Why would I want double financial rape.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Depends what it is. A consumption tax of the usual 3% or so probably wouldn’t turn most people off. An income tax though, that would be a different story. I still think that schooling/healthcare/quality of family life are much bigger issues for potential new hires than a consumption tax.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

Honestly the consumption tax wouldn’t bother me too much unless it’s on food items as well. Many places in the States exempt grocery from taxation. Even then it wouldn’t be a deal breaker. I rarely, if ever, buy anything else here as it’s cheaper to buy (clothes, electronics, etc) in the States and ship thru Aramex if needed now or I wait till I return home and buy then. I’d say the biggest boost for the gov’t would be a rise in gas prices and an end to free utilities. the wastefulness here is off the charts and both would slightly affect that maybe. An income tax, as I would envision it would happen, would be a deal breaker for sure.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Yeah, and I would imagine that any consumption tax would be like elsewhere – core food products exempt and junk food subject to the tax.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

I’m sure there is a double taxation agreement with the U.S.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Really? I thought that it was financial support from the much more responsible Abu Dhabi. Hmmm, my mistake. Anyway, no, when the OG and goes away it will be very very difficult to replace the billions that Qatar spends annually. No one sector will be able to completely replace it, hence the focus on supplementing, not replacing.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

which is a known country of producing oil or making money of expat ???? its oil money ,nothing else

Huzz
Huzz
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

They don’t need to be part of the workforce or pay tax. Their parents are working and they (the children) as humans are consuming through food and other costs of living.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Do you want a work force or not? To get qualified people in the higher level jobs they will not come without their families. Qatar’s choice I guess. Hire the qualified expats with tag along families or….Get an Education, Get A Job!

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

sorry qualified is a big word considering the quality of work being in Qatar lately , don’t flatter your self . most wont find jobs in their own countries . family or not , its a job , you either take it or not

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

And I guess the $100,000 question is…do you have a job?

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Well if the people here are so crap that they can’t find work in their home countries, but they are all being employed by Qatari companies, or the Qatari government, what does that tell you about these companies? At the end of the day all of us are employed by at least a 51% Qatari ownership, or work for the government. So don’t blame us if you think we aren’t good enough. Blame the people who are responsible for us being here.

qatari.
qatari.
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

its the lack of proper qualification scanning, many where found in QF & QP etc

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari.

I think that was a “local” problem. Jobs given with no qualifications other than wasta.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

or expat working under undocumented qualification

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

mine is perfectly documented and my skills perfectly appreciated by those who employ me.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Mine has been attested at the Qatari Ministry of Foreign Affairs. I hope you aren’t suggesting that the people working there are also idiots. You have a lot of complaints about so many Qatari government policies and procedures I can’t keep up with them all.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

He has more complaints than expats have. Thinking of calling the QSS and reporting this subversiveness.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Is he the same guy preaching about loyalty elsewhere? He seems particularly disgruntled with the Qatari government. Not a great idea.

MIMH
MIMH
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Good point. One person who is looking at the long term future of Qatar. The waste in public money the last 10 years has been amazing, but at last they are trying to do something.

I wouldn’t worry about these private schools though, they are not publicly funded and Qatari’s make twice out of them. Once through the profit in fees and second charging rent for the buildings.

Michkey
Michkey
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Its great to know that you ‘feel’ for that ‘public’ money! Government-paid schools follow Qatari curriculum only. Expat schools are privately funded and satisfy ‘overpaid’ expat parents as well as greedy owners. So what’s to moan about?

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

just wanted an Expat honest point view .if one can find honesty

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

lol that’s a rich comment. Qatar pays nothing for private schools. So what’s your beef?

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

its better not, it will be consider a a waste of public money

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I’ll assume from your grammar you went to the public schools. You seem to have a problem thinking out of the box. ONE of the traits of a local education.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

You’re being too hard DesertCard – he or she is probably only about 17, so there is no reason to expect a sophisticated understanding of economics or international recruiting issues yet.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

as long as your small mind can get what iam saying . i think im fine . LOL

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I don’t get what your saying at all. Nor do the others commenting on here. I definitely stand by my statement now. LOL

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I don’t understand your point at all. Can you please rephrase it?

Pete
Pete
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Cheap shot…criticising someone trying to speak English. Totally uncalled for.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Pete

It was more for not being able to think out of the box. But thanx for your input.

Huzz
Huzz
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I feel that I need to give you a picture of the real Qatar. You may feel that there is public money but there is not. Really in terms of a country there is no Qatar. There is the Al Thani family and they are Qatar. There is Al Thani money and not public money. The Al Thani families allow the flow of funds down to the common Qataris through freebies and income generated from businesses run to service the expat population. The reason for this is simply to keep the native population content and quiet so that the Arab Spring does not awaken here and allow the flow of funds to continue to the top level. Why do you think that you do not have a real government representative of the people? So let’s take this a step forward and see a little more shall we.

There are about 300,000 Qataris in the “country” and at a guess and only a guess about 100,000 of them are available to the workplace. Most of them work for the government. What do they do for the gov? Why they work in departments set up to service the expat presence in the country. If there were no expats then these departments would be much smaller or not exist at all. Then where would all these gov employees go to find work?

Oil and gas: let’s just take it that the Qatari population are either not willing or not able to get this resource out of the ground themselves. Therefore to get the “government” the funds that they want they have to bring in a lot of people to do the work. I would estimate that there are more people working in oil and gas than there are in the entire Qatari population. Therefore if you want the resource (and they certainly want this one) you need the people. These people are skilled. One cannot just dig randomly and get this stuff. Skilled people will want to be with their families. If you want the skilled people then you will need to provide the ability for their families to be here.

Construction: My favorite. I think that this may be the biggest lie here. They are not building a country. They are dividing up the wealth and trying to keep it in the country. The vast amount of people here are in this sector. My opinion here is that as long as the gas lasts there will be construction on big projects. This generates so much wealth and allows the money generated through oil and gas to be moved between the families. Construction demands service industries and these industries are owned or part owned by the families right down to the corner shop. Every time any transaction happens part of the funds make their way back to a local family. So again, without all the expats there would not be the construction and the service industries would disappear. Then another means of wealth generation and dispersion would disappear.

Schools: My colleagues here have explained this one already. Having that said I will mention it again. Schools have a two fold advantage. Firstly they are used as part of the bait to bring or keep people here. Secondly they generate revenue for the local families through either profit share or rental agreements.

Qatar Airways. I like QR. the company is changing slowly and being more responsible. They will mature and grow but they will need to be clever about it going forward. The bank of Tamim will not last forever. They also need a spokesperson who can relate to people. Enough said.

Finally, this post is not anti Qatar and not anti Qatari. I have Qatari friends and I would show this post to them. I know that they would agree with what I have said. I am also a fan of Tamim and I think that he works very hard with the hand that he has been delt. He is trying to make product Al Thani into a country that can survive in the post o&g future. It will not be the same come that time. I am also a huge fan of Sheika Mozah. I truly believe that she is a light in the Gulf Arab world.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Huzz

Well put

Aussiegirl
Aussiegirl
5 years ago
Reply to  Michkey

Some expat parents aren’t overpaid, so it does make it difficult for the average Joe workers to fund school places. It’s a myth to assume that everyone is on the salary of a gas/oil director. Many companies do not fully cover school fees and the annual increase in fees (like the cost of living) vastly outstrips any small pay increase that the company offers.

Ibrahim Seydaliyev
Ibrahim Seydaliyev
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

1. International schools are not funded by Qatari government, everything is paid by parents or companies
2. All schools are owned by Qatari nationals and reason for extremely high school fees is partly their greed and partly high cost of living (also being boosted by greed of landlords)
3. Big part of international school students are Qatari, whos parents do not trust into Qatari education system

H
H
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Why does everyone have a problem with one person expressing his opinion. Many expats have hatred running through their veins. Their Whataboutism arguments are hilarious too.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  H

Where do you see hatred? The original poster is being taught basic economics. How is that in any way hatred? The only insults in this conversation were from the original poster who called someone small brained.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  H

welcome to DN , where its always Expat right , Local wrong .

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

When the shoe fits….

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

sorry , you don’t make any sense

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Yeah, the poster makes perfect sense. He or she is being idiomatic.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

you just blew his mind and he’s scrambling for the dictionary

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

no he i can understand his comments , you i have hard time with all the hate in yours . LOL

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I have no hate at all. Just tired of your rambling arguments that make no sense. Luckily I have some spare time while wasting so much Qatari money at work. So I’m able to answer your cluelessness. As Anonmauser has perfectly explained, this is the road the Qatari gov’t has chosen to go on. I see Qatar relying on expats to… well… do everything for the country. From getting the gas out of the ground to playing sports. It’s really a crazy system here. Grateful cause I was able to work here and make some decent money, but crazy none the less. Until such a time that Qatar is self sufficient, lol, that’s the obvious bitter pill you have to swallow. Including education for our children where this discussion all started. And the road chosen is not sustainable. What happens when the gas runs out and the expats leave? Wes Craven, RIP, couldn’t come up with a scarier scenario.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

again , i balm HR ppl who didnt have did a good job hiring you. what a wast

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

again i balm ppl who educated you as it was obviously a wast.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

I’m generally in favour of balm, particularly the menthol kind.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

I had a chest cold last winter and the vicks worked perfectly

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

Tiger balm forever!

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Again [not again], I [not i] blame [not balm] HR people [not ppl] who didn’t [not didnt] do [not did] a good job hiring you (well done! 5 correct words in a row!). What [not what] a waste [not wast].

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

obviously you didn’t understand

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

So fundamentally what you object to is that the Qatari government needs to spend huge amounts of money keeping the expat population happy, because the alternative – that Qataris do the work the expats currently do – is not likely?

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

It all goes back to that love/hate relationship that Gulf populations have always had with the expats. They hate that we’re here “destroying” their culture but the alternative is actually doing the work themselves, meaning a job, and then they love us. Until the merry go round starts spinning again.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

again , when you start actually doing your job ( if you were really have the qualification for it ) , and at least pay tax here. you might have a right of say ( our land , our laws )

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

if most do their jobs & stopped demanding what they are not entitled for. or pay tax ,then you might have some sort of saying in the matter how things are done here. ( our land .our laws. our ways )

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

A local preaching about entitlement. Now thats funny

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  desertCard

something your uprising lack

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

uprising? u do know what entitlement means right?

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

You are the one who has posted about 50 different comments on this thread about how you disagree with the government spending money on schools and how you disagree with the government spending money on expats and how you disagree with the government’s policies on hiring foreigners. I’m not complaining – I have a job and a tax free salary. It’s you complaining about the government.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Funny thing is I’m more entitled to my life here than you. I work and make the country stronger. Something tells me you don’t work and are only a consumer. So what good are you to the country? From your previous post I’d say according to your thinking, not much.

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Not always, but in this case, well, yeah.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

i disagree

Anonmauser
Anonmauser
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

Noted. Will you be sharing your economic insights with the government? I’m sure that they will give your ideas the attention that they deserve.

Michael Fryer
Michael Fryer
5 years ago
Reply to  Anonmauser

Isn’t it time for someone to play the ‘jealousy’ card? And then a serving of the ‘but what about in your country when…?’ and ‘but don’t forget that … years ago … was happening’.

desertCard
desertCard
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael Fryer

I know the commentators who do that and they must be on vacation.

Michael L
Michael L
5 years ago
Reply to  qatari

I guess it’s the only place in Qatar where that’s the case !!!

Yummykarak
Yummykarak
5 years ago
Reply to  H

I don’t think that’s the case.
It’s just the individual’s argument (qatari) was not making sense, as has been seen before from this users comments on other topics.
They seem not very well informed and more out to provoke than have a proper discussion and seem to be very anti-anything that is not Qatari. It may just be a language barrier.
Of course, there are people here who do complain a lot about Qatar which can be annoying.
But all the individuals working in Qatar, who wish to build a life here, in my opinion have the right to do so. If they are positive and productive individuals towards the state then they should be able to bring their families and have a sense of home shared with us. Their kids should be able to go to school.
Even if Qatar did build the schools, I would have no issue.
These people have supplied their skills, time and in some cases life toward’s Qatar. There is no shame in giving back.
Building a few schools wouldn’t be that big of a dent in our banks anyways. If he wants to get to it then rather than worrying about spending on schools, worry about maybe buying islands…or whatever else. Worry about us not diversifying our economy.A few schools is trivial.

And this individual can express his view, even if it appears very shallow + selfish and this is coming from a fellow Qatari. Thank you.

Mark
Mark
5 years ago

I’m not in need of school places, but I have to wonder: will these new schools be staffed, equipped and open to students beginning next week? Not to mention recruiting students. Wow, that would be very impressive.

qatari
qatari
5 years ago
Reply to  Mark

the government ones are , and the faculty are there starting this week. don’t know if its the same with the private ones though .