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Doha
Friday, July 23, 2021

Sudden change in alcohol rules at hotels upsets customers

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An abrupt change to regulations governing the sale of alcohol in Qatar’s hotels last night prompted staff to cancel events at the last minute, causing upset among some Doha residents.

According to a media representative from one five-star hotel, hotel managers received written notice from authorities yesterday evening informing them that alcohol could no longer be served around their swimming pools or on their beaches.

Previously, luxury hotels in Qatar were allowed to serve alcohol in all of their bars, cafes and restaurants.

It is unclear, however, whether the notice is indicative of a new rule, or simply renewed enforcement of an existing one. A spokesperson for one popular hotel told Doha News that the regulation is not new.

Because it’s the weekend, hard facts and official comment on the change has been hard to come by. But since last night, it’s become apparent that:

  • Doha’s five-star hotels no longer appear to be allowed to serve alcohol at their pool and beach bars, St. Regis, the Intercontinental, W Doha, the Ritz Carlton and the Four Seasons have told Doha News;
  • Restaurants with outside terraces, like Hakkasan at the St. Regis, appear to be unaffected;
  • The Four Seasons, St. Regis and the Ritz Carlton canceled their beach parties last night, as a direct result of the new rules, though the Marriott did not; and
  • The W Hotel confirms that Wahm is still selling alcohol, but its pool bar, WET, is not.

Meanwhile, a spokeswoman for the Intercontinental was unable to confirm whether the new regulations would affect its beach events.

The reason for the change remains unclear, though the issue of safety has been raised by some event organizers, who say water and alcohol-fueled brains don’t mix.

The Ministry of Interior did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Reaction to the ban has been swift on Twitter – and somewhat divided:

For some, the latest change to alcohol sale regulations has been reminiscent of the ban on alcohol sales on the Pearl-Qatar, which was introduced with no warning in December 2011.

A number of high-end restaurants and bars on the luxury island have reported steep drops in revenue after they were suddenly banned from selling alcohol, with some closing months after the new rule took effect.

Thoughts?

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MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Oh dear. With all the bad publicity surrounded Qatar 2022, with slave labour, football players being held hostage in the country for years, the rape and brutal murder of a teacher recently, dead kids at Villagio due to negligence does Qatar really need to give the worlds media more ammununtion.

I suggest whoever is running Qatar’s PR campaign needs to get fired, all they are doing is projecting an image of intolerance towards foreigners. Hardly the welcoming epitaph Qatar wants if it is to hold major world sporting events. (World is the important word here)

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

There is someone running it….?

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
7 years ago

Yes, and paid VERY generously.

MN
MN
7 years ago

Let’s hope they do not enforce worst measures that might affect the 2022 World Cup later on.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  MN

It will be the first dry World Cup and all players will be forced to grow long beards…..

desertCard
desertCard
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

And wear capri pants instead of shorts.

Pete
Pete
7 years ago

Forward planning..advance notice..concepts that seem to be foreign to the authorities.

KK
KK
7 years ago
Reply to  Pete

The planning horizon is usually a couple of hours in this respect.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Pete

On that I can agree with you 🙂

Pete
Pete
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Been sometime since you agreed with me…am I doing something right or wrong? 🙂

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Careful Abdulrahman. You’re in danger of moving over to the dark side….

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
7 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

I jest, of course.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  Pete

forward planning not even in their dreams, otherwise the urbanistic of Doha would not be this way, mainly the expressway would have been built differently…..

KK
KK
7 years ago

Are we surprised ? It is clear what direction has been choosen for the country.

DickDePilot
DickDePilot
7 years ago

I think that this move will see so many people visiting Qatar that they will have to purchase a fleet of Tourist buses to cope! 🙂

Diego
Diego
7 years ago
Reply to  DickDePilot

Maybe they can use the new boat taxis to scoot to Dubai for a drink or two

Turbohampster
Turbohampster
7 years ago

Well thats the Intercom beach bankrupt then! Same as the Pearl why would you bother to go there now?

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

Does anyone know what happened to prompt this? Did someone drive their land cruiser down the beach at speed and kill some people?

desertCard
desertCard
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

NO that would be OK but if it were some sri lankan taxi driver all hell would break loose.

Mr Haydar
Mr Haydar
7 years ago

What did I tell you?! Total haram-clean-up. What could be the next? The nightclubs. Alcohol, decadent music and dancing, mixed gender goers… Anytime before the Christmas.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Mr Haydar

I wish … 🙂

Mr Haydar
Mr Haydar
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Sorry Osama if you didn’t sense a sarcasm in my post.

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago

This is going to really hit Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee hard as they need to deliver enough hotel rooms for players, fans, VIPs and other visitors for the World Cup. No major hotel chain will want to invest in such an uncertain business climate. With one of the hotels major revenue streams removed there is not a strong enough business case to open a new hotel. (4 weeks full occupancy for the World Cup just doesn’t cut it)

Who will build all the hotels now? The Qatar Tourism authority? How many white elephants can Qatar want?

Turbohampster
Turbohampster
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Exactly my thoughts! You would be mad to invest money here! Just ask the guys @ UDC

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago

“Think people are starting to forget that drinking in Qatar is a privilege, not a right. Abuse it and it won’t be around” Ah, common sense, how I love it 😀

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

To be able to have a driving licence is a privilege not a right, but I see it abused every single day on Qatar’s roads and only today we have (another) land cruiser involved in a killing on the roads, yet the authorities take no action.

Has anyone being abusing the privilege of drinking at the hotels? I haven’t heard of any stories or even any rumours, this is why this does not make sense.

Call it out as it is, this is political nothing more.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

It’s a privilege that makes an awful lot of money for this country! Do you have any idea of what abuse has been going on though? I haven’t heard anything.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

I haven’t either, in this case at least. But knowing the affect alcohol has on people, and the many many examples that can be found just about anywhere where alcohol is available, it’s not hard to imagine what type incident has finally lead to this ban.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Though you can probably agree that if there had been a drowning, we would have heard about it.

Will
Will
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

I’m willing to bet that more people die from Toyota Land Cruisers in Qatar then they do from alcohol. Perhaps we should bad Toyota Land Cruisers from being used outside too?

That aside, this ban is clearly designed to upset expats. It’s a shame there’s so little tolerance here.

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

“an awful lot of money for this country”??? you mean more than the oil and gas?

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Of course not. I’m not an idiot.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

The profit margin on the alcohol is probably higher than that of the hydrocarbons

Sharkfinn
Sharkfinn
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

“Profit margin”? If restaurants sold LPG alongside the box wines I would agree. The money the government would make out of liquor sales in hotels (alcohol tax?) wouldn’t come close to how much the State of Qatar makes out of natural gas.

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

Agreed! For now. Maybe the word ‘fusion’ should be criminalised in Qatar?

Sharkfinn
Sharkfinn
7 years ago
Reply to  Myrddin

You’re confusing.

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

If pumping hydrocarbons makes you very wealthy, I can understand your confusion. If nuclear fusion offers deliverance from hydrocarbon blackmail, then fusion is good.
New steps, every year.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

Perhaps you should find out the difference between profit and revenue, then you might agree with me.

Sharkfinn
Sharkfinn
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Still, you’re proposing that Qatar makes better profit out of liquor sales.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

Profit = Revenue – Costs.

Of course Qatar makes more revenue on hydrocarbons than alcohol. However I said “Profit Margin”. A pint of beer is around $10 in a hotel in Doha, lets call that $20 a litre. Lets make an conservative educated guess that it cost $10 a litre to import it, thats a 50% profit margin. LPG, of which Qatar is a major world exporter, gives a profit of around 14%. Qatar makes more money of hydrocarbons as it sells more of it than alcohol by a factor of a million. However, that doesn’t mean that the profit margin per unit is lower

Sharkfinn
Sharkfinn
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

While you’re at it, tell me, how much is that pint of beer at the QDC?

Point is, the hotels in Doha don’t sell LPG. Likewise, Qatar doesn’t sell alcohol (unless there’s liquor tax imposed on establishments). These two things aren’t mutual.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

Ford doesn’t sell iphones and Apple doesn’t sell cars. I can still compare the profit margins on their goods.

I cannot be bothered to further debate a flippant remark I made about profit margins any further. Read a book on economics if you would like to know more.

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  Sharkfinn

I believe your question ought to be, how much is QDC purchasing that pint for?!

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

It is has a longer future than the prices that Qatar is getting for its gas, and as is said below, the profit margin is great. I’d think it would be a great growth industry to diversity Qatar’s economy. 😉

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Actually QDC makes a lot of money for QA.

Please don’t close QDC.

Please don’t close QDC.

Do you think if I say it enough times with my fingers crossed it might come true?…..

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

No QDC in KSA, yet the social life was better. No 5* bars, just bars!

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Desert Witch

And here I thought Qatar Airways didn’t make any money and was completely dependent on government subsidies.

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

Money is money & those who have more desire even more,this is human nature,irrespective of ethnicity or religion. There are enough people here well aware of what a particular alcoholic beverage costs for QDC to purchase & what ridiculous profit margins they are making selling it! QDC is part of Qatar Airways,when you add on routes that have like 10 passengers per flight just to add to the number of destinations you fly to,the profits have to come from somewhere right?! Make no mistake about it,VERY LARGE sums of money are being earned in profits from the sale of alcohol in Qatar & ALL of that profit is going to? Correct!

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Annon

And here’s me thinking alcohol is haram.

Diego
Diego
7 years ago

Well it does make Qataris feel uncomfortable in their homeland.I spend a lot of time in Malaysia and given the muslim population, I find it perplexing why it can be relaxed in one place versus another. An example…I recently visited a duty free zone in a City in Mayaysia and upon exit it was required to pay a tax on alcohol purchased there.Who collected the money? A muslim female who was very friendly and even reduced the tax for me because i was questioning how the duty free system worked.

QNan
QNan
7 years ago

Let’s just hope they enforce this law as stringently as they enforce laws on speeding, texting while driving, smoking indoors, withholding passports from workers, seat belt use, labor safety regulations, motorcycles at the Pearl, and many other issues in Qatar.

Qatar’s enforcement priorities really do leave me baffled.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago

Drinking around bodies of water really isn’t that important. The main issue here is how change is handled. It’s fine if you want to ban alcohol next to a pool or on the beach, but why do you wait until Thursday afternoon to inform the affected businesses? It makes no sense whatsoever. You disrupt peoples plans, and cause business owners hardship. How hard would it be to give a month’s notice?

If this change is indicative of a future alcohol ban then I hope then a little prior notice will allow people to plan accordingly, whether that means relocation, stockpiling, or cleaning the bathtub!

Lest we forget, “Mamnoueh maqroubieh” (All that is forbidden is desired). People have to want to stop to engage in illegal or dangerous behavior (solicitation of prostitutes, gambling, abuse of employees, chain smoking in front of children, or reckless driving). Laws, whether religious or secular, simply don’t mean that much to some people, and they certainly don’t erase illegal activity. They just push it further and further underground. I guess Qatar just has to decide which battles are worth fighting. Personally, I think there are bigger threats to the nation’s spiritual and economic health, but it’s not my decision.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

Well said

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

I agree wholeheartedly with the second sentence here. Developed governments (and I think of Western governements here) make decisions to change rules all the time. Some changes are popular, and others aren’t. Fine.
However, what has been embraced is that the expectations of the population need to be managed through well-managed communications.
If this is to be the rule, I am not too bothered as I rarely go to hotels and sit and drink pool or beach side. Nevertheless, giving adequate notice, and a date in which the rule is to be enforced from is simple good ‘stakeholder’ management. It costs nothing, and will reduce the rants from the population – expat or otherwise.
And this is not the only example. The changes in rules throughout Qatar are implemented without the appropriate communication or the allowance of time to adapt to the new rules.
I also agree with comments about this not being suitable preparation for the world cup. If they do need more hotels here, it will take about 2 years to build and get ready, and at least 10 years to make the investment worthwhile. Taking away a significatn revenue stream will make this 15 years, and investors will not be bothered and invest elsewhere and get their return 10 year, perhaps in UAE.

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago

well that’s good news, controlling alcohol is a must

MIMH
MIMH
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Usually I use a glass, otherwise the stuff spills all over the floor….

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

good to know

disqus_ZM5UFScbWq
disqus_ZM5UFScbWq
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

LOL!

Net-guy
Net-guy
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

jello shooters are another way to contol it..

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Net-guy

Aah! Sid Jellies, a big favourite in KSA, especially among the medical crowd – they had an infinite supply of those little shooter sized disposable plastic pots, for administering meds to the patients.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

Go intravenous, the ultimate in control.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

AHAHAHAHAHAH!!!!!!!!!
Good sense of humor as usual…..

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

hahahaha! nice one!

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

It’s already heavily controlled and regulated, but perhaps you hit the nail on the head! This could be no more than lip service to make it seem like further regulation is happening to placate those sensitive to the availability of alcohol in the first place.

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

it should be band not even controlled people are forgetting this is a Muslim country and come on honestly they can still serve alcohol put not out in public

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

What is your issue with alcohol being served in public?

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

it is a danger to themselves and those around them

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Do you mean it is dangerous for people to drink alcohol around water or to drink alcohol generally?

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Nowhere near as much as smoking

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Or letting a child sit in a car without a seatbelt

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Or eating MacDonalds or Kentucky Fried Chicken when you are obese

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

I agree…sometimes when I drink I spontaneously combust. With this dry environment it could have all sorts of effects on those around me.

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Aisha, you are very right.
You should be aware of the things you put in your mouth when it comes to processed food and all those greasy fast food that people ’round here love so much. That’s pure poison!

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Many of us have seen the horrible affect alcohol has had on people we know, often family and friends, who destroyed their lives and those of their loved ones becasue they couldn’t control themselves.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

As you said, “…they couldn’t control themselves.” Most people can control themselves. And if God bans alcohol and people still choose to drink, what makes you think a government has more power?

BillyBob
BillyBob
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

You’re argument is stupid, guest 8.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  BillyBob

Your grammar is atrocious, BillyBob. Thanks for contributing in a meaningful way!

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

I think BillyBob’s vacabulary is very limited. Have mercy on him LOL!!

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

I was just continuing the in the ad-hominem vein.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

The point is they couldn’t control themselves. There are millions of people who drink alcohol with no detrimental effect to themselves or those around them. This is my point about the knee-jerk reaction here….someone couldn’t handle alcohol so let’s ban everyone from drinking it. It doesn’t solve the problem.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Banning really makes the problem far worst. When one drinks in public, they are subject to judgement and potentially legal repercussions if they get out of hand. One of the signs of alcoholism is drinking in secrecy. When someone resorts to hiding that they drink, they may have far crossed a healthy limit. Honestly, if drinking were banned here, it wouldn’t affect me personally. I can’t be bothered, but I think that drinking in secrecy would lead to a lot of familial problems both for expats and nationals.

Net-guy
Net-guy
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

promise, i don’t have a drinking problem..
i only drink when im alone or with someone….lol

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Net-guy

I hope you don’t, Net-guy. Drinking, drugging, otherwise self-inflicted problems are no fun for all involved!

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

Totally agree, Guest 8. I doubt very much that alcohol will be banned. It’s an easy source of good revenue here. It always makes me laugh when they go on about it being ‘haram’ but are happy to make a massive profit from it. I see bottles of wine that I wouldn’t even look at in the UK because they’re cheap table wine on sale at ridiculous prices at QDC. And the way such bottles are presented to you in the hotels at an even greater price as if they’re Chateauneuf- du-Pape. It’s laughable.

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

What ever happened to Liebfraumilch and Blue Nun?

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Jimjam

I think you can get them at QDC at 60QR a bottle!

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Bargain!!!!!

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

Not millions, billions

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

And many of us have seen the terrible effects smoking and poor driving have done.
The issue here is not control, but enforcement of those controls. For alcohol and driving they have rules. Yet, they seem to enforce one but not the other. I think what alot of people want is equal application of the law on all counts for all people.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Jimjam

As I’m often told by some here, 2 wrongs don’t make a right 😉

fullmoon07
fullmoon07
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

do you know why they destroyed their lives? Because it was attractive to get alcohol, something that is prohibited.
For those of us who come from countries where wine is part of our agriculture and culture, we are used to see it since small children on our tables and it is something we can try any time. That’s why it is not so attractive to get drunk.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

You don’t have alcoholics (people who are addicted to alcohol) in your country?

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Oh come on! Surely surely you can do better than that? Or are my expectations just too high?! Seriously,surely you know enough to know that suppression of anything only leads to higher levels of desire? This is human nature,add to that equation a well-off local population (the richest in the world according some sources) amongst whom many don’t really need to work a 9-5 job to earn a living & what do you have? I would continue but I know you catch my drift.

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
7 years ago
Reply to  fullmoon07

Before traveling around Europe & talking with many locals, I used to believe that there was amazing maturity in Europe that allowed people to drink responsibly in bars, events & parties from the age of 14 onward. Then I realized what other Europeans told me was n fact the truth: saying growing up around alcohol & thus not being inclined to abuse it often is a myth that many Europeans comfort themselves with.

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

So you’re saying prevent 90% of social drinkers who enjoy a pint (or 5!) with friends/family/etc. after a week’s hard work, who don’t create public nuisance,who get back home without bothering anyone simply because of the 10% who can’t control themselves?!

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

There are lots of interpretations of what it means to a “Muslim country” (as if countries chose religions..). Qatar is but one model, Bosnia another, Qatar seems to be working to make up its mind what type it is. The Qatari model is not the norm most Muslims live under.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

You should go to Indonesia, another “Muslim country”. Never been so drunk in all my life, and oh the prostitutes there, just thinking about it makes me go giddy…………

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Sold!

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

I really don’t think these comments do much to add to the conversation.

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

It makes it clear that alcohol is not a Muslim issue, just a GCC one

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

It’s your argument but it seems like your point is more that a being a muslim country does not necessarily mean alcohol must be banned.
Nevertheless I am on your side.

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

you will find non Muslim Indonesians but you cant find Qataris who are not Muslim

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Do you know every Qatari, and Indonesian?

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

And do you know that all Qataris are teetotal?

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

Indonesian no but i know for sure that all Qataris are Muslim

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

I hate to burst your bubble, but I know of a few Qataris who consider themselves atheists. 🙁

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

then know this they are not original Qataris

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

in your opinion

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

I am quite sure that being atheist and Qatari are not mutually exclusive.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Yes, they are. Born and bred.

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

No, just very, very secretive about their beliefs, for their own good!

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Then know this, you are deluded if you believe that. What does ‘original’ have to do with it, btw? As far as anyone except the ‘original’ or ‘non-original’ are concerned, all Qataris are the same.

Shabina921
Shabina921
7 years ago

Please, can we keep the conversation relevant to the story?

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Shabina921

Fair enough, my bad. Apologies where needed.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Shabina921

Why Ms. Shabina, are you trolling to control us (sorry couldn’t resist) :p

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

i’ve just shown your response to a Qatari, who promptly laughed

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

i honestly don’t care

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

I do, would you like a big drunken hug 🙂

Aisha
Aisha
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

keep it to yourself thanks

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

big hugs to you both. gtg a bottle of duval is calling

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  Kingpin

I would.

Ivan Brendieswski
Ivan Brendieswski
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Except the atheist ones, who, funnily, you only ever meet them outside of Qatar.

Myrddin
Myrddin
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Given that, de-facto, they are ALL born as Muslims, and there is no possibility of opting out at a later date, that is far short of a victory in freewill?

Net-guy
Net-guy
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

only in their actions….

KK
KK
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Tell that to your fellow people as they do not know how to behave when drunk.

Annon
Annon
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

Malaysia is a Muslim country as well,where in fact in certain more conservative states a Muslim caught drinking alcohol can be caned along with serving a jail term yet anyone can purchase a beer from even the smallest of corner shops in Kuala Lumpur so please,save us the ”this is a Muslim country” rhetoric because it’s merely an excuse & a pretty silly one at that.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

The word ‘control’ is the issue for me. Qatar needs to learn that it cannot ‘control’ everyone and everything. Not if it wants to develop itself to be on the world stage. Knee-jerk reactions like this only serve to make it a laughing stock around the world.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Grantley

“Qatar needs to learn that it cannot ‘control’ everyone and everything.” And yet, we always see people here commenting on the need to have more police presence to “control” the bad driving! I believe more control is needed in both cases.

Grantley
Grantley
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

I appreciate your point but it’s not about controlling things, it’s about managing them in a sensible, organised, planned manner. Having rules that apply to everyone across the board and clearly communicating and enforcing that.

Guest8
Guest8
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

If you go out to a bar in Doha, which I’m guessing you don’t Abdulrahman, and act the fool, endangering, at the least your reputation, and at the most, the patrons of the watering hole, you will be arrested. I have seen it happen and have heard of it happening (and rightly so). This is appropriate use of control and enforcement of the rules. On the whole, people behave themselves because they know public intoxication is not tolerated. If, however, you drive like a fool and endanger the lives of every single person you come across: driver, passenger or pedestrian, the likelihood that you’ll get away with it is very high.

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
7 years ago
Reply to  Guest8

That’s true & is a major issue of concern that should tackled.

Lisa Clayton
Lisa Clayton
7 years ago
Reply to  Abdulrahman

Absolutely. I never had a problem living in a place where access to alcohol — (or the right to abuse it and cause problems for others) — was controlled.

I’d worry a lot less about what the rest of the world thinks of me, and more about what is best for my own society. I may be one of the few that was happy to live in a place where alcohol was subjected to some control as it was when I lived in Qatar.

Abdulrahman
Abdulrahman
7 years ago
Reply to  Lisa Clayton

It’s the Qatar effect; the more and better you have it here, the more you complain about the most inane of things. It applies to both expats and locals alike. Just sit comfortably in Bahrain and watch us duke it out 😉

Steve Owen
Steve Owen
7 years ago

Qatar is definitely becoming more conservative as a nation, not sure how they will cope with 20,000 drunks in 2022! and thats just the players and couching staff!

osamaalassiry
osamaalassiry
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve Owen

A good solution would be to completely ban alcohol … 2 days before the world cup…

Or just ignore the rules for a month…..

I know that many Qataris would like to have a wold cup holiday…. to leave the country and not see it all…

Jimjam
Jimjam
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

And a good many more would love there to be a world cup. Dont stick around if you dont want to be here for the world cup. No-one is forcing you to – unless you need an exit permit (another debate entirely…and for another day)

Kingpin
Kingpin
7 years ago
Reply to  osamaalassiry

“A good solution would be to completely ban alcohol … 2 days before the world cup…”

haha that made me laugh

Observant One
Observant One
7 years ago

Ban tobacco as well please…sick of breathing in others cancer causing toxins……

Sharkfinn
Sharkfinn
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Indoor smoking is already banned in many restaurants, but your average Filipina waitress doesn’t have the guts to confront a group of burly Arab men about it.

Desert Witch
Desert Witch
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

Ban prostitution also. That would help counteract the upsurge in moral turpitude.

hawkeye31
hawkeye31
7 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

On a related note, ban e-cigs as well, at least indoors. I know that there is no evidence of harm from inhaling the vapours, but that’s only because no long term studies have been done yet.