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Friday, February 26, 2021

VIDEO: I Love Qatar sets the record straight on ‘inshAllah’

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In its latest weekly #QTip, ILoveQatar.net addresses the true meaning of the Arabic word “inshAllah.”

Local comedian Hamad Al-Amari said the word, which means “God-willing,” is sadly misused by people who don’t intend to follow through with their commitments.

According to Al-Amari:

“When you say Inshallah, it means you if I’m still here tomorrow and if I’m in good health, I’ll get it done – unless an asteroid falls on me.

Unfortunately today people say Inshallah in a negative way like they’re not going to do what they’re supposed to do – they say it because they don’t want someone to be asking too much of them. That’s not what it means!”

He concludes by imploring people to use the term the right (positive) way.

How do you use the term inshAllah? Thoughts?

18 COMMENTS

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MN
MN
6 years ago

Inshallah = hopefully (If I’m not hit by an asteroid)

desertCard
desertCard
6 years ago
Reply to  MN

Or more likely a LC

Aussie expat
Aussie expat
6 years ago

I never use it and generally know that when it is used, whatever it is in relation to is not going to happen.

disqus-eyrhws
disqus-eyrhws
6 years ago

I like watching these videos on Mr. Qs’ dedicated web page the best

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago
Reply to  disqus-eyrhws

Yes he is pretty awesome. They do a very good job and for me they serve as “ambassadors” to Qatar. I really like catching their videos.

Chilidog
Chilidog
6 years ago

When I hear that phrase by anyone on the customer service side of things in Qatar, I hear it translated it in my head as, “I’m not doing jack, you’re on your own and probably SOL.”

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

Hahahahahah. My thoughts exactly. That’s a good one.

Expat Girl
Expat Girl
6 years ago
Reply to  Chilidog

I completely agree. Regardless of the intended interpretation, in the business world this means “it’s not happening” and “I’m not going to do anything to action this”.

If we are going with the “God-willing” approach, then I must ask, why is it that 100% of the time I hear “Inshallah” that the particular event NEVER happens; does that mean God is not willing to support and promote the interest of Qatar?

Realistically “Inshallah” is an excuse, not a valid principle for a legitimate society. It is a fantastic excuse for when things FAIL. Then blame “inshallah” because obviously God wasn’t willing to make it work…

MIMH
MIMH
6 years ago

The direct English translation is this when you ask someone if they will do something, (especially related to work):

Inshalla – It may happen

Bokra inshalla – it will never happen

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago
Reply to  MIMH

The translation that I surmise from its use locally is more like “F@#K off”
Hahahaha. I think people tell me inshallah when they want to get rid of me to tell me to shut up. LOL

Vanessa
Vanessa
6 years ago

There should be a law against medical professionals saying “Inshallah” to patients!

Expat Girl
Expat Girl
6 years ago
Reply to  Vanessa

In my recent experience with medical “professionals” at Al Ahli, the friend I was with got not only an “inshallah” but also a “HALAS” (meaning it’s finished) accompanied by a dismissive hand clap followed by “jazz hands”. I’ve never seen-red to that extent in my life. Long story short: the patient is home getting feedback from a doctor who is actually a professional.

Saleem
Saleem
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat Girl

It’s “Khalas” btw.

Shabina921
Shabina921
6 years ago
Reply to  Expat Girl

jazz hands??

BBCA
BBCA
6 years ago

Lol! It is such a shame but when people use the word I learned so quickly not to trust much they have to promise. I got so frustrated with a plummer because he kept telling me that Inshallah he will be back to fix a water leak until finally I told him “No inshallah…. I want to hear yes or no… If you can not give a yes or no then I will never use you again”

To make a long story short I got another plummer that gave me a yes/no answer and he actually showed up as promised. Inshallah is like a 4 letter word to me now. I dont use it and hate to hear it!

Observant One
Observant One
6 years ago

Good work Mr Q….Nice video.

2 years on..our compound has been waiting for delivery of pool side furniture, every month I or one of the others enquires about it, and we have get 2 weeks enshalla….2 years and still waiting….enshalla it will come in 2 weeks…

sicti
sicti
6 years ago
Reply to  Observant One

InshAllah until you’ll leave the compound pool side furniture will be delivered 🙂

Ms. Hala
6 years ago

This is one of my favorite Islamic phrases to use and in coming here was disappointed to hear it used as an excuse. If you can’t wo/man up and say “no” then do what you need to do, period! Don’t use God’s name in vain… #JustSaying

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